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Kester Bull-Hereñu

Kester Bull-Hereñu
Laboratorio Flores

About

55
Publications
17,563
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444
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
Fundación Flores
Position
  • Coordinador

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Full-text available
Mechanical forces acting within the plant body that can mold flower shape throughout develop-ment received little attention. The palette of action of these forces ranges from mechanical pres-sures on organ primordia at the microscopic level up to the twisting of a peduncle that promotes resupination of a flower at the macroscopic level. Here, we ar...
Article
Full-text available
RESUMEN Presentamos una nueva clasificación de Malesherbia para Chile que tiene como base la última revisión publicada del género. De acuerdo con ella, Malesherbia en Chile reúne a catorce especies y diez variedades, de las que nueve especies y nueve variedades son endémicas del país. Se discuten los cambios nomenclaturales de la sección Xeromontan...
Article
We present here an updated classification of Malesherbia taxa native to Chile including 14 species and 10 varieties, of which 9 species and 9 varieties are endemic to the territory. Distributional and nomenclature adjustments have been adopted following a combination of literature and herbarium revisions, field observations and additional collectio...
Article
Full-text available
The flower of Malesherbia Ruiz & Pav. (Passifloraceae) is a suitable model to study how far growth constraints throughout ontogeny are causal for the variation in the proportions of reproductive structures. The Malesherbia flower is characterized by a marked hypanthium subtending five alternating sepal and petal lobes plus a coronal rim. In Maleshe...
Article
We present a comparative flower ontogenetic study in five species of the genus Eucryphia with the aim of testing whether differences in the organ number observed can be explained by changes in the meristematic size of floral meristem and floral organs. Species native to Oceania, viz. E. milliganii, E. lucida and E. moorei, have the smallest gynoeci...
Article
Full-text available
Recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and a series of important palaeobotanical discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of angiosperm diversification. Yet, the origin and early evolution of their most characteristic feature, the flower, remains poorly understood. In particular, the structure of the ancestral flower of all living angi...
Article
Full-text available
Floral development is an important discipline within plant morphology, which in turn is the oldest botanical discipline. Recent achievements in molecular phylogeny, physiology and ecology have recalled the importance of floral development. To evaluate its contemporary relevance, we organized the JPR (Journal of Plant Research) symposium about the f...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: Obdiplostemony has long been a controversial condition as it diverges from diplostemony found among most core eudicot orders by the more external insertion of the alternisepalous stamens. In this paper we review the definition and occurrence of obdiplostemony, and analyse how the condition has impacted on floral diversificatio...
Article
Full-text available
Morphogenesis in plants is usually reconstructed by scanning electron microscopy and histology of meristematic structures. These techniques are destructive and require many samples to obtain a consecutive series of states. Unfortunately, using this methodology the absolute timing of growth and complete relative initiation of organs remain obscure....
Article
Full-text available
This paper is a discussion and elaboration of a paper by Prenner & al. (2010), entitled “Floral formulae updated for routine inclusion in formal taxonomic descriptions”. The aim of the Prenner paper was to promote the use of floral formulae in botany and to reach a consensus among botanists for best practice. An important purpose of floral formulae...
Article
Full-text available
Background Genes encoding TCP transcription factors, such as CYCLOIDEA-like (CYC-like) genes, are well known actors in the control of plant morphological development, particularly regarding the control of floral symmetry. Despite recent understanding that these genes play a role in establishing the architecture of inflorescences in the sunflower fa...
Data
Primer sequences used for GenomeWalker, 3 ′ RACE, and quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) experiments.
Data
Nucleotide sequence alignment of selected set of CYC-like genes used to reconstruct the phylogenetic tree shown in Figure 5. GenBank accession numbers for each sequence are included in the FASTA identifiers.
Article
Full-text available
Backgrounds and AimsConceptual and terminological conflicts in inflorescence morphology indicate a lack of understanding of the phenotypic diversity of inflorescences. In this study, an ontogeny-based inflorescence concept is presented considering different meristem types and developmental pathways. By going back to the ontogenetic origin, diversit...
Article
Full-text available
Backgrounds and AimsCurrent research in plant science has concentrated on revealing ontogenetic processes of key attributes in plant evolution. One recently discussed model is the 'transient model' successful in explaining some types of inflorescence architectures based on two main principles: the decline of the so called 'vegetativeness' (veg) fac...
Article
Inflorescences are usually designed as closed or open, referring to the presence or absence of a terminal flower (TF), respectively. Until now, it was unknown how much developmental constraints in the inflorescence meristem (IM) determined the production of the TF. To face this question, we carried out a quantitative study of inflorescence developm...
Article
Full-text available
The absence of a terminal flower in inflorescences (‘open inflorescences’) is currently explained by the maintenance of putative stem-cells in the central zone (CZ) of the inflorescence meristem (IM) governed by the CLAVATA–WUSCHEL regulatory loop. Disruption of this regulatory pathway, as in Arabidopsis TERMINAL FLOWER LOCUS 1 mutants, leads to te...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative ontogenetic studies in Daucus carota inflorescences illustrate that terminal flower producing umbellets ('closed' umbellets) have larger apical meristems than umbellets that lack terminal flowers ('open' umbellets). This structural difference is achieved through ontogeny by a different shaping of the apical meristem: in open umbellets...
Article
Full-text available
Flowering-time, plant longevity and size of capitulum were studied in a common garden experiment on seven populations of annual Chaetanthera moenchioides derived from a strong latitudinal aridity gradient in the mediterranean climate area of Chile. Populations derived from the drier northern part of the latitudinal gradient showed significantly sho...
Article
Aim: Colliguaja odorifera Mol., a Euphorbiaceous shrub of central Chile, inhabits the matorral formation, growing at low altitudes on both Andean and coastal mountain range slopes. In the recent geological past, this region was subjected to climatic changes and geological disturbances that most probably caused population shrinkages on the Andean mo...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
FLO-R-ES, the Flower Research Synectics network, has been founded in 2014 to stimulate discussion and collaboration among researchers interested in flower morphology. To understand the diversity of flowers, a multitude of approaches is needed explaining the flower as an evolutive outcome. Hence, FLO-RE-S intends to be a platform for plant scientists to design, discuss and promote joint collaborative research on diverse flower-related questions. Main topics pursued by FLO-RE-S participants range from morphogenesis and phenotypic plasticity of the flower to synorganisation of floral parts, floral biology and floral evolution. To date, FLO-R-ES has taken part of four international meetings. Contributions presented at the first meeting have been published in a special issue on flower structure in Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants (2016). Contributions presented at the second meeting are now in press in a special issue in the Journal of Plant Research. Please visit us at www.flores-network.com