Kerstin Schreiber

Kerstin Schreiber
McGill University | McGill · Department of Geography

Ph.D. Candidate in Geography
Looking for new opportunities at the intersection of research and governance

About

12
Publications
1,691
Reads
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37
Citations
Introduction
Kerstin Schreiber is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geography at McGill University. She holds a B.A. in Business Administration and an M.Sc. in Urban Studies and completed a summer school program on Urban Food Systems. Her research interests include local food systems, urban foodsheds, rural-urban relationships, and food systems sustainability.
Additional affiliations
February 2019 - August 2019
Institute for the Study of International Development, Montréal
Position
  • Research Assistant
January 2019 - present
McGill University
Position
  • Teaching Assistang
September 2018 - December 2018
McGill University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2018 - June 2021
McGill University
Field of study
  • Geography
July 2017 - August 2017
University of Amsterdam
Field of study
  • Urban Food Studies
August 2016 - June 2018
Malmö University
Field of study
  • Urban Studies

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Advocates for re-localizing food systems often encourage consumers to support local farmers and strengthen local food economies. Yet, local food systems hinge not only on consumers' willingness to buy local food but also on whether farmers have the social support networks to address diverse challenges during food production and distribution. This s...
Article
The Covid-19 pandemic has demonstrated the vulnerability of food systems to disturbances. Advocates have promoted short food supply chains as more resilient and adaptable thanks to their embeddedness in local economic and ecological networks. As part of a broader case study on challenges facing farmers in local food supply chains in Québec, Canada,...
Article
Full-text available
Cities are net consumers of food from local and global hinterlands. Urban foodshed analysis is a quantitative approach for examining links between urban consumers and rural agricultural production by mapping food flow networks or estimating the potential for local food self-sufficiency (LFS). However, at present, the lack of a coherent methodologic...
Article
Nearly one hundred years ago, a group of Mennonites left the prairies of Manitoba for the deserts of Northern Mexico. Since then, Mennonites have created over two hundred agricultural colonies across Latin America, spanning nine countries and seven biomes. In this paper, we provide the first continental-scale map and account of Mennonite expansion...
Article
Full-text available
As graduate students, and despite having vastly different backgrounds, we share a common goal: to positively impact society by producing actionable, social-ecological science. Making the leap from student to impactful researcher, however, was harder than we had each anticipated. While our undergraduate training predominantly consisted of classroom...
Conference Paper
Given the growing pressures on our planet through the current food system, it is increasingly important to understand the transformative potential of urban food systems and their capacity to build pathways to sustainability. According to the United Nations, more than half of the world’s population now lives in urban areas with predictions that this...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Urbal is an international project that uses participatory research in eight cities to develop and test a holistic methodology to map the impact pathways that go from urban innovations to all dimension of sustainability of food systems. Mapping impact pathways will allow Urbal to develop a methodology that describes how innovations take place in terms of knowledge and material flows, networks, challenges and opportunities. Some impacts of innovations are obvious, but others are indirect, mediated, incidental, retroactive, unexpected or delayed. The Urbal mapping of innovation impact pathways aims to depict this complexity. A sustainability framework is at the core of our research approach with environmental, socio-cultural, food security, and nutrition and governance considerations central to our research. We are interested in innovations that include two or more of these sustainability dimensions. Urbal’s goal is to develop the methodology as a decision-making tool for practitioners and policymakers as a way to provide a common overview of innovation impact pathways and how they evolve. We will do this by engaging practitioners, researchers, and other stakeholders in participatory workshops to make impact pathways apparent and to co-produce knowledge about how practitioners use innovations to bring about change.