Kentaro Arikawa

Kentaro Arikawa
Sokendai (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies) · Department of Evolutionary Studies of Biosystems

PhD

About

206
Publications
34,335
Reads
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6,125
Citations
Citations since 2017
32 Research Items
2489 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
Introduction
Working on insect vision, most intensively on color vision in butterflies. Employ multiple methods including behavioral analysis, electrophysiology, LM and EM anatomy, physiological optics, molecular biology, and simulation.
Additional affiliations
April 2006 - present
The Graduate University for Advanced Studies
Position
  • Professor (Full)
October 1987 - March 1989
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • Fogarty International Fellow
October 1983 - March 2006
Yokohama City University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
April 1979 - September 1983
Sophia University Graduate School
Field of study
  • Behavioral Biology
April 1975 - March 1979
JiyuGakuen College
Field of study
  • Natural Science

Publications

Publications (206)
Article
During the 99 years of its history, the Journal of Comparative Physiology A has published many of the most influential papers in comparative physiology and related disciplines. To celebrate this achievement of the journal’s authors, annual Editors’ Choice Awards and Readers’ Choice Awards are presented. The winners of the 2023 Editors’ Choice Award...
Article
Full-text available
Light environments differ dramatically between day and night. The transition between diurnal and nocturnal visual ecology has happened repeatedly during evolution in many species. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the evolution of vision in recent diurnal–nocturnal transition is poorly understood. Here, we focus on hawkmoths (Lepidoptera:...
Article
Connectomics has become a standard neuroscience methodology in a few model animals,¹ with the visual system being a popular target of study.2, 3, 4, 5 Combining connectomics with circuit and behavioral physiology, recent studies on the color vision of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster have focused on the mechanisms underlying early wavelength p...
Article
This year marks the inauguration of the annual Editors' Choice Award and the Readers' Choice Award, each presented for outstanding original papers and review articles published in the Journal of Comparative Physiology A. The winners of the 2022 Editors' Choice Award were determined by vote of the Editorial Board for the most highly recommended pape...
Article
Full-text available
We demonstrate that the small white butterfly, Pieris rapae , uses color vision when searching flowers for foraging. We first trained newly emerged butterflies in a series of indoor behavioral experiments to take sucrose solution on paper disks, colored either blue, green, yellow, or red. After confirming that the butterflies were trained to visit...
Article
Full-text available
The dorsal wings of male Sasakia charonda butterflies display a striking blue iridescent coloration, which is accentuated by white, orange-yellow and red spots, as well as by brown margins. The ventral wings also have a variegated, but more subdued, pattern. We investigated the optical basis of the various colors of intact wings as well as isolated...
Article
Full-text available
Color vision is widespread among insects but varies among species, depending on the spectral sensitivities and interplay of the participating photoreceptors. The spectral sensitivity of a photoreceptor is principally determined by the absorption spectrum of the expressed visual pigment, but it can be modified by various optical and electrophysiolog...
Article
We studied the wing colouration and the compound eyes of Red Admiral butterflies with optical methods. The measured reflectance spectra of the wing and scales of Vanessa atalanta could be quantitatively explained by an optical model of overlapping scales stacked on the wing. We utilized the eyeshine in the compound eye of Vanessa indica to determin...
Article
Jewel beetles are colorful insects, which use vision to recognize their conspecifics and can be lured with colored traps. We investigated the retina and coloration of the flathead oak borer, Coraebus undatus, using microscopy, spectrometry, polarimetry, electroretinography, and intracellular recordings of photoreceptor cell responses. The compound...
Article
Full-text available
The butterfly Papilio xuthus has acute tetrachromatic color vision. Its eyes are furnished with eight spectral classes of photoreceptors, situated in three types of ommatidia, randomly distributed in the retinal mosaic. Here, we investigated early chromatic information processing by recording spectral, angular, and polarization sensitivities of pho...
Article
Several butterflies of family Nymphalidae perform long-distance migration. Orientation during migration has been extensively studied in the monarch, Danaus plexippus Extensive studies on D. plexippus have revealed that vision plays a crucial role in orientation during migration. Differences in the migratory patterns of butterflies suggest that not...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Absorption spectra of opsin-based pigments are tuned from the UV to the red regions by interactions of the chromophore with surrounding amino acid residues. Both vertebrates and invertebrates possess long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsins, which underlie color vision involving “red” sensing. The LWS opsins have independently evolved in eac...
Poster
Full-text available
Detailed investigation of the eye of the Chestnut Tiger butterfly which migrates over thousands of kilometers between Hong Kong and Japan. This species has the potential to become an alternative model species for the study of visual orientation during migration due to differences in its migratory patterns compared to the Monarch butterfly.
Article
Full-text available
The two subspecies of the small white butterfly, the European Pieris rapae rapae and the Asian P. r. crucivora, differ in wing colouration. Under ultraviolet light, the wings of both male and female P. r. rapae appear dark, whereas the wings of male P. r. crucivora are dark and those of females are bright. It has been hypothesized that these sexual...
Article
Full-text available
The swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus can perceive the linear polarization of light. Using a novel polarization projection system, we recently demonstrated that P. xuthus can detect visual motion based on polarization contrast. In the present study, we attempt to infer via behavioural experiments the mechanism underlying this polarization-based...
Article
Full-text available
Jumping spiders have four pairs of eyes (ocelli) of which only the principal eyes (PEs) are used to detect features of objects. Photoreceptors in the retina of the PEs form four layers (PL1‐4) and terminate in the first optic ganglion (FOG). Here we focus on Hasarius adansoni because it has unique depth vision besides color vision and its FOG appea...
Article
Spectrally opponent responses, i.e. wavelength‐dependent inversions of response polarity, have been observed at the level of photoreceptors in butterflies. Since inter‐photoreceptor connections have been found in the butterfly Papilio xuthus, and histamine is the only neurotransmitter so far identified in insect photoreceptors, we hypothesize that...
Article
Histamine is the only known neurotransmitter released by arthropod photoreceptors. Synaptic transmission from photoreceptors to second order neurons is mediated by the activation of histamine-gated chloride channels (HCLs). These histaminergic synapses have been assumed to be conserved among insect visual systems. However, our understanding of the...
Article
Full-text available
The palm borer moth Paysandisia archon (Burmeister, 1880) (fam. Castniidae) is a large, diurnally active palm pest. Its compound eyes consist of ~ 20,000 ommatidia and have apposition optics with interommatidial angles below 1°. The ommatidia contain nine photoreceptor cells and appear structurally similar to those in nymphalid butterflies. Two mor...
Article
Full-text available
Lamina monopolar cells (LMCs) are the first-order visual interneurons of insects and crustacea, primarily involved in achromatic vision. Here we investigated morphological and electrophysiological properties of LMCs in the butterfly Papilio xuthus Using intracellular recording coupled with dye injection, we found two types of LMCs. Cells with round...
Article
Full-text available
Background: We have found that the spectral sensitivity of the compound eye in the summer fruit tortrix moth (Adoxophyes orana) differs in laboratory strains originating from different regions of Japan. We have investigated the mechanisms underlying this anomalous spectral sensitivity. Methods: We applied electrophysiology, light and electron mi...
Article
Full-text available
Following gene duplication events, the expression patterns of the resulting gene copies can often diverge both spatially and temporally. Here we report on gene duplicates that are expressed in distinct but overlapping patterns, and which exhibit temporally divergent expression. Butterflies have sophisticated color vision and spectrally complex eyes...
Article
Full-text available
The bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) has become a common model animal in the study of various aspects of vision and visually guided behavior. Although the bumblebee visual system has been studied to some extent, little is known about the functional role of the first visual neuropil, the lamina. In this work, we provide an anatomical and electrophysiol...
Article
While the linear polarization of light is virtually invisible to humans, many invertebrates' eyes can detect it. How this information is processed in the nervous system, and what behavioral function it serves, are in many cases unclear. One reason for this is the technical difficulty involved in presenting images or video containing polarization co...
Article
Flying is often associated with superior visual performance since good vision is crucial for detection and implementation of rapid visually-guided aerial movements. To understand the evolution of insect visual systems it is therefore important to compare phylogenetically related species with different investments into flight capability. Here, we de...
Article
Butterflies use colour vision when searching for flowers. Unlike the trichromatic retinas of humans (blue, green, and red cones; plus rods) and honeybees (ultraviolet, blue, and green photoreceptors), butterfly retinas typically have six or more photoreceptor classes with distinct spectral sensitivities. The eyes of the Japanese yellow swallowtail...
Article
Full-text available
The facet lenses of the compound eyes of long-legged flies (Dolichopodidae) feature a striking, interlaced coloration pattern, existing of alternating rows of green-yellow and orange-red reflecting facets, due to dielectric multilayers located distally in the facet lenses (Bernard and Miller. Invest Ophthalmol 7:416–434 (1968). We investigated this...
Article
We investigated the ability of colour discrimination and learning in male adults of nocturnal cotton bollworm moth, Helicoverpa armigera, under a dim light condition. The naïve moths preferred blue and discriminated the innately preferred blue from several shades of grey indicating that the moths have colour vision. After being trained for 2 days t...
Article
Full-text available
Phototaxis has been described in many insects, which are often attracted to specific wavelengths of light. However, little is known about phototaxis in parasitoid insect species that are potentially useful for integrated pest management. In this study, we investigated the wavelength dependency of the phototactic behavior of the parasitoid fly Exori...
Data
Number of flies attracted to each LED. (CSV)
Data
Spectral sensitivity of compound eye in Exorista japonica. (CSV)
Data
Irradiance spectra of the LEDs. (CSV)
Article
Full-text available
Butterflies rely on color vision extensively to adapt to the natural world. Most species express a broad range of color sensitive Rhodopsins in three stochastically distributed types of ommatidia (unit eyes)1–3. The retinas of Drosophila deploy just two main types, where fate is controlled by the binary stochastic decision to express the transcript...
Article
Butterfly eyes are furnished with a variety of photoreceptors of different spectral sensitivities often in species-specific manner. We have conducted an extensive comparative study to address the question of how their spectrally complex retinas evolved. Here we investigated the structure and function of the eye of the common bluebottle butterfly (G...
Article
Full-text available
Butterflies have well-developed color vision, presumably optimally tuned to the detection of conspecifics by their wing coloration. Here we investigated the pigmentary and structural basis of the wing colors in the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, applying spectrophotometry, scatterometry, light and electron microscopy, and op...
Article
Full-text available
The colourful wing patterns of butterflies play an important role for enhancing fitness; for instance, by providing camouflage, for interspecific mate recognition, or for aposematic display. Closely related butterfly species can have dramatically different wing patterns. The phenomenon is assumed to be caused by ecological processes with changing c...
Article
Full-text available
Many insects' motion vision is achromatic and thus dependent on brightness rather than on colour contrast.We investigate whether this is true of the butterfly Papilio xuthus, an animal noted for its complex retinal organization, by measuring head movements of restrained animals in response to moving two-colour patterns. Responses were never elimina...
Article
Full-text available
The eyes of the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, contain six spectral classes of photoreceptors, each sensitive either in the ultraviolet, violet, blue, green, red or broadband wavelength regions. The green-sensitive receptors can be divided into two subtypes, distal and proximal. Previous behavioral and anatomical studies hav...
Article
Full-text available
Flower-visiting insects exhibit innate preferences for particular colours. A previous study demonstrated that naive Papilio xuthus females prefer yellow and red, whereas males are more attracted to blue. Here, we demonstrate that the innate colour preference can be modified by olfactory stimuli in a sexually dimorphic manner. Naive P. xuthus were p...
Article
Full-text available
Several examples of insects using visual motion to measure distance have been documented, from locusts peering to gauge the proximity of prey, to honeybees performing visual odometry en route between the hive and a flower patch. However, whether the use of parallax information is confined to specialised behaviours like these, or represents a more g...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Human color vision is tri-chromatic, with three opsins expressed in cone photoreceptors that are sensitive in the red, green, and blue region of the spectrum. As theories predict, such tri- or tetra-chromacy with three or four opsin genes is common among mammals, birds, and other animals, including insects. However, we discovered that...
Article
Full-text available
1.Many of the ‘adaptive’ traits in angiosperm flowers occur only in some species within a clade. One good example of such traits is floral colour change, i.e. the retention of old, non-reproductive, rewardless, but fully turgid flowers in an altered colour. This trait has been viewed as a plant strategy to enhance distant pollinator attraction whil...
Article
Papilio butterflies highly depend on visual information in their flower foraging behavior. The retina of Papilio xuthus has been studied well, whereas the visual system in the brain is poorly understood. By investigating outputs from the optic lobe to the central brain, we found that the mushroom body of P. xuthus receives prominent direct inputs f...
Article
Colour vision in humans is 'middling' at best, both figuratively and literally in the animal visible spectrum of 300-750 nm. This comes as a surprise to many of us as we cannot imagine the need to see more colours than the millions we can manage. The fact is that many animals have colour vision that exceeds our red-green-blue (RGB)-based trichromac...
Article
The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande and the onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman are major pests of Satsuma Mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) fruits under greenhouse culture. To use thrips’ phototactic behavior for plant protection, we first determined the spectral sensitivity of the compound eyes of T. tabaci by recording e...
Article
In order to develop an economical pest-control lighting system for two noctuid species, Helicoverpa armigera and Mamestra brassicae, we investigated the daily activity of these two species with illumination at night. The compound eye spectral sensitivity of the two moths showed peaks at 360 nm and 500—550 nm. We selected green LED peaking at 535 nm...
Article
The spectral sensitivity of photoreceptors is primarily determined by the expressed rhodopsins. After a brief introduction to the photochemistry of insect rhodopsins, the relatively simple case of bee visual pigments and photoreceptors is described, followed by the more complicated cases of butterflies and flies. Although the main focus is on the p...
Article
抄録 We measured the phototactic behavior of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) under the LED light of various spectral content and intensity. The light intensity required to elicit a 50% behavioral response to the stimulus yielded the action spectrum of the phototactic behavior. The action spectrum peaks at 525 and 355...
Article
Full-text available
For compass orientation many insects rely on the pattern of sky polarization but some species also exploit the sky chromatic contrast. Desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria, detect polarized light through a specialized dorsal rim area (DRA) in their compound eye. To better understand retinal mechanisms underlying visual navigation, we compared opsi...
Chapter
Full-text available
We summarize the history of the “Dark-fly” project here. We describe the method of maintenance and results of experiments performed by Shuiti Mori, who initially started this project about 60 years ago. We also conducted statistical re-examination of some data. As a result, we concluded that differences between the “Dark-fly” and a control fly were...
Chapter
Full-text available
Locomotor activity rhythms of Dark-stock flies of Drosophila melanogaster kept in complete darkness for 700–1,340 generations were examined. The activity of flies was recorded under the conditions of continuous darkness and of light–dark cycling. The activity rhythm of the experimental dark stock flies observed in continuous darkness was not weaken...
Chapter
The ultrastructure of the compound eye of Dark- and control flies was examined. Flies of both groups reared with nutrient-poor Pearl’s medium exhibited a considerable degree of degeneration of the rhabdomeres. When they were reared with nutrient-rich standard cornmeal medium, the rhabdomeres of Dark-fly showed partial degeneration, while those of t...
Article
Full-text available
We studied the effective action spectrum of phototactic behavior and compound eye spectral sensitivity in the yellow tea thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood. We compared positive phototactic responses in S. dorsalis among several light wavelengths( 355, 405, 468, 525, 590, 631, 660 nm). Scirtothrips dorsalis showed strong positive phototaxis at 355...
Article
Full-text available
Spectral sensitivity of insect visual system is one of the most important functions that are useful for controlling potential pests. After briefly summarizing the basic structure of two typical compound eye types, the apposition type of diurnal insects and the superposition type of nocturnal insects, we will introduce the mechanisms underlying the...
Article
This paper gives an overview of behavioral studies on the color and polarization vision of the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. We focus on indoor experiments on foraging individuals. Butterflies trained to visit a disk of certain color correctly select that color among various other colors and/or shades of gray. Correct selec...
Article
Full-text available
In a previous study of the phototaxis of green rice leafhoppers, Nephotettix cincticeps (Hemiptera, Cicadellidae), we found positive responses to 735 nm light. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying this sensitivity to near-infrared light. We first measured the action spectrum using a Y-maze with monochromatic lights from 480 to 740 nm. We...
Article
Full-text available
To understand the visual responses of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula, we investigated the behavioral preference for wavelengths, and also checked the spectral sensitivity of the bug. The compound eyes of N. viridula adults showed a bimodal sensitive pattern to wavelengths (300-740 nm), responding strongly to ultraviolet region (peak...
Article
We studied the wavelength dependency of phototactic behavior, the eye structure, and opsin genes of the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). The action spectrum showed that N. lugens was attracted to wide wavelength range of light; i.e. from 365 nm to 735 nm. The preference test between two wavelengths indicated th...
Chapter
Recent progress in genome science enables us to determine the whole genome sequences of laboratory-evolved organisms and to address the molecular mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation. We determined the whole genome sequence of Dark-fly and identified many genomic alterations in its genome. Analysis of the population genome structure revea...