Kenneth Goudie

Kenneth Goudie
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of Languages and Cultures

Doctor of Philosophy

About

11
Publications
224
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Introduction
I received my Ph.D. from the University of St Andrews in November 2016. My doctoral research examined the reinvention of jihād ideology in twelfth‑century al‑Shām. I am currently a postdoctoral researcher on the ERC Project ‘The Mamlukisation of the Mamluk Sultanate-II”, within which I am developing my own research project on the historical writings of the fifteenth-century Qurʾān exegete and historian, Burhān al-Dīn al-Biqāʿī (d. 885/1480). I am in the process of identifying and exploring al-Biqāʿī’s social networking strategies and how he interacted with–and how he positioned himself within–the socio-economic, cultural, and political dynamics of the Cairo Sultanate.
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
Ghent University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2016 - June 2017
University of Nottingham
Position
  • Teaching Affiliate
August 2016 - December 2016
University of St Andrews
Position
  • Fellow
Education
September 2012 - November 2016
University of St Andrews
Field of study
  • Medieval History
September 2011 - November 2012
University of St Andrews
Field of study
  • Medieval History
September 2007 - June 2011
University of St Andrews
Field of study
  • History

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
The Arabo-Islamic world of the later medieval period (thirteenth–sixteenth centuries) witnessed substantial transformations in the writing and reading of Arabic literary texts. For a long time, the study of these texts and of their diversity and changes was determined by the model of a “post-classical” literary field in fossilizing decline. In the...
Book
In Reinventing Jihād, Kenneth A. Goudie provides a detailed examination of the development of jihād ideology from the Conquest of Jerusalem to the end of the Ayyūbids (c. 492/1099-647/1249). By analysing the writings of three scholars - Abū al Ḥasan al Sulamī (d. 500/1106), Ibn ʻAsākir (d. 571/1176), and ʻIzz al-Dīn al-Sulamī (d. 660/1262) - Reinve...
Chapter
In his Tāʾrīkh Dimashq, Ibn ʿAsākir concludes his biographical notice of Ibn al-Mubārak, the famous eighth-century ascetic and ghāzī, by recounting a series of dreams in which Ibn al-Mubārak appears and discusses his fate in the afterlife. Invariably, Ibn al-Mubārak enjoys a privileged status. Of particular interest are four dreams in which Ibn al-...
Conference Paper
When discussing the life of Burhān al-Dīn al-Biqāʿī (809/1406–885/1480), a fifteenth-century Qurʾān exegete and historian, modern scholarship has primarily focused on the three controversies in which he became embroiled (on the use of the Bible in tafsīr, the poetry of Ibn al-Farīḍ, and the theodicy of al-Ghazālī) and which defined the downward tra...
Conference Paper
It is neither controversial nor speculative to state that in the eighth century there were regional differences regarding jihād. This has been described most succinctly by Roy Mottahedeh and Ridwan al-Sayyid who, on the basis of the kitāb al-jihād in the Muṣannaf of ʿAbd alRazzāq (d. 211/827), argue that there was a circle of Syrian jurists in the...
Conference Paper
The Kitāb al-jihād of ʿAlī b. Ṭāhir al Sulamī (d. 1106) is the earliest extant response to the First Crusade and the establishment of Christian control over much of the Levantine coastline. At its most basic level it is a call to jihād which seeks to exhort the Muslim populace of al Shām to fight back against the crusaders. Whilst the Kitāb al-jihā...
Conference Paper
The Kitāb al-jihād of al-Sulamī (d. 1106) is the earliest extant example of the Muslim response to the First Crusade. At its simplest, it exhorts the Muslims of al-Shām to fight the crusaders: as part of this al-Sulamī calls upon his audience to give precedence to the jihād against their anfus over the jihād against the crusaders. The term nafs (pl...
Conference Paper
In his Tāʾrīkh Dimashq, Ibn ʿAsākir lavishes attention on the famous eighth-century ascetic and ghāzī, Ibn al-Mubārak. There are a great many biographical notices of Ibn al-Mubārak from the ninth century onwards, though the majority of those compiled before the turn of the eleventh century are nothing more than short, formulaic statements of the ba...
Conference Paper
In his Tāʾrīkh Dimashq, Ibn ʿAsākir concludes his biographical notice of Ibn al-Mubārak, the famous eighth-century ascetic and ghāzī, by recounting a series of dreams in which Ibn al-Mubārak appears and discusses his fate in the afterlife. Invariably, Ibn al-Mubārak enjoys a privileged status. Of particular interest are four dreams in which Ibn al-...
Conference Paper
The Muslim-Byzantine wars led to the development of a number of Islamic apocalyptic traditions concerning Christian campaigns to recapture Syria. In the conclusion to his discussion of these traditions, Suliman Bashear suggests that scholarly interest in this body of material may have experienced a 'new impetus' in the aftermath of the first crusad...
Conference Paper
An important element in the “Sunnī Re-centering” was the revival and development of jihād theory in al-Shām during the century following the first crusade. The earliest extant source for the Muslim response to the establishment of Christian control over much of the Levantine coastline is Kitāb al-Jihād (Book of Jihād), written by the Damascene scho...

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
This thesis examines the reinvention of jihād ideology in twelfth‑century al‑Shām. In modern scholarship there is a tendency to speak of a revival of jihād in the twelfth century, but discussion of this revival has been dominated by study of the practice of jihād rather than of the ideology of jihād. This thesis addresses this imbalance by studying two twelfth‑century Damascene works: the Kitāb al‑jihād (Book of Jihād) of ʿAlī b. Ṭāhir al‑Sulamī (d. 500/1106), and the al‑Arbaʿūn ḥadīthan fī al‑ḥathth ʿala al‑jihād (Forty Hadiths for Inciting Jihād) of Abū al‑Qāsim Ibn ʿAsākir (d. 571/1176). Through discussion of these texts, this thesis sheds light on twelfth‑century perceptions of jihād by asking what their authors meant when they referred to jihād, and how their perceptions of jihād related to the broader Islamic discourse on jihād. A holistic approach is taken to these works; they are discussed not only in the context of the 'master narrative' of jihād, wherein juristic sources have been privileged over other non‑legal genres and corpora, but also in the context of the Sufi discourse of jihād al‑nafs, and the earliest traditions on jihād which thrived from the eighth century onwards on the Muslim‑Byzantine frontier. This thesis argues that both al‑Sulamī and Ibn ʿAsākir integrated elements from these different traditions of jihād in order to create models of jihād suited to their own political contexts, and that it is only in the context of a more nuanced appreciation of jihād ideology that their attempts can be properly understood. At the same time, this thesis argues against the model of the 'counter‑crusade', which holds that the revival of jihād began in earnest only in the middle of the twelfth century, by stressing that there was no delay between the arrival of the Franks and attempts to modify jihād ideology.