Kennedy Wolfe

Kennedy Wolfe
The University of Queensland | UQ · Marine Spatial Ecology Lab

PhD

About

45
Publications
13,857
Reads
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906
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2010 - July 2017
The University of Sydney
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
1. Biodiversity of terrestrial and marine ecosystems, including coral reefs, is dominated by small, often cryptic, invertebrate taxa that play important roles in ecosystem structure and functioning. While cryptofauna community structure is determined by strong small‐scale microhabitat associations, the extent to which ecological and environmental f...
Article
Tropical sea cucumbers are in peril due to overharvest. Sixteen species are endangered or vulnerable (IUCN) with high-value teatfish recently listed on CITES Appendix II. In light of these listings, we review the Queensland Sea Cucumber Fishery, which harvests CITES-listed black teatfish (Holothuria whitmaei) and white teatfish (H. fuscogilva), and...
Article
Full-text available
Structural complexity provided by the living coral reef framework is the basis of the rich and dynamic biodiversity in coral reefs. In many cases today, the reduction in habitat complexity, from live coral to dead coral and rubble, has altered the abundance and diversity of many reef species with impacts on community structure, food webs and ecosys...
Article
Abstract. Crown-of-thorns sea stars (Acanthaster sp.) are among the most studied coral reef organisms, owing to their propensity to undergo major population irruptions, which contribute to significant coral loss and reef degradation throughout the Indo-Pacific. However, there are still important knowledge gaps pertaining to the biology, ecology, an...
Article
Full-text available
Global and local anthropogenic stressors such as climate change, acidification, overfishing, and pollution are expected to shift the benthic community composition of coral reefs from dominance by calcifying organisms to dominance by non‐calcifying algae. These changes could reduce the ability of coral reef ecosystems to maintain positive net calciu...
Article
Full-text available
Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) sediments are the dominant form of CaCO3 on coral reefs accumulating in lagoon and inter-reefal areas. Owing to their mineralogy and a range of physical parameters, tropical CaCO3 sediments are predicted to be more sensitive to dissolution driven by ocean acidification than the skeleton of living reef organisms. How this s...
Article
Full-text available
Ion‐sensitive field effect transistor‐based pH sensors have been shown to perform well in high frequency and long‐term ocean sampling regimes. The Honeywell Durafet is widely used due to its stability, fast response, and characterization over a large range of oceanic conditions. However, potentiometric pH monitoring is inherently complicated by the...
Article
Full-text available
Length–weight relationships (LWRs) are a fundamental tool for the non-intrusive determination of biomass, a unit of measure that facilitates the quantification of ecosystem and fisheries productivity. LWRs have been defined and broadly applied for many marine species across a range of ecosystems, especially regarding fishes. However, LWRs are yet t...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem-based management on coral reefs has historically focussed on biodiversity conservation through the establishment of marine reserves, but it is increasingly recognised that a subset of species can be key to the maintenance of ecosystem processes and functioning. Specific provisions for these key taxa are essential to biodiversity conservat...
Article
Full-text available
Microorganisms are fundamental drivers of biogeochemical cycling, though their contribution to coral reef ecosystem functioning is poorly understood. Here, we infer predictors of bacterioplankton community dynamics across surface-waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) through a meta-analysis, combining microbial with environmental data from the eRe...
Article
1. To ensure standardised, quantitative and repeatable methodologies, marine ecologists have engineered a range of artificial units to survey benthic communities with varying designs depending on target taxa, life history stage and habitat. In tropical ecosystems, autonomous units have typically lacked microhabitat complexity (e.g. planar tiles), s...
Article
Globally, millions of people depend on nutritional benefits from seafood consumption, but few studies have tested for effects of near-future climate change on seafood health and quality. Quantitative assessments of the interactive effects of climate change and discarding of fisheries resources are also lacking, despite ∼10% of global catches being...
Article
Coastal and intertidal habitats are at the forefront of anthropogenic influence and environmental change. The species occupying these habitats are adapted to a world of extremes, which may render them robust to the changing climate or more vulnerable if they are at their physiological limits. We characterised the diurnal, seasonal and interannual p...
Article
Herbivory is a key ecosystem function that influences ecosystem trajectories. However, interactions between plants and herbivores are species-specific and change throughout the plants’ lifetime. On coral reefs, herbivorous fishes reduce competition between corals and macroalgae through their grazing activity, thereby regulating the ecosystem state....
Article
Full-text available
While tropical sea cucumbers are among the most conspicuous mobile invertebrates on coral reefs, information on their population biology and ecology is limited, particularly for dendrochirotids (suspension feeders). Here, we characterised a localised high-density population of the small and poorly described dendrochirotid, Colochirus quadrangularis...
Technical Report
Full-text available
https://nesptropical.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/NESP-TWQ-Project-4.6-Final-Report.pdf
Article
Full-text available
Recreational fishing practices can have significant impacts on marine ecosystems but their catch dynamics are often difficult to quantify, particularly for spearfishing. On coral reefs, the impacts of recreational spearfishing are often considered to be negligible compared to other practices, but the highly selective method adopted by spearfishers...
Article
Full-text available
Sea stars of the family Asterinidae are well known for their diverse life history strategies encompassing sexual reproduction through various larval forms, while others, all multi-armed species, through clonal asexual reproduction. For at least 25 years, a geographically isolated population of the minute (radius < 7 mm) tropical Pacific fissiparous...
Article
Full-text available
Predation by the crown-of-thorns seastar (CoTS; Acanthaster sp.) is a pervasive stressor attributing to the decline of coral reefs. These outbreaks are suggested to be linked to eutrophy-driven recruitment pulses, where increased nutrients enhance larval success. CoTS larvae, however, are tolerant of oligotrophic conditions typical of tropical ecos...
Article
Despite the important ecological roles of commercial bêche-de-mer holothuroids in coral reef ecosystems their reproductive biology is poorly studied, including on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). We investigated reproduction of Stichopus herrmanni , a commercially important species listed as Vulnerable, at One Tree Island, southern GBR. Gonad index, h...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs feed millions of people worldwide, provide coastal protection and generate billions of dollars annually in tourism revenue. The underlying architecture of a reef is a biogenic carbonate structure that accretes over many years of active biomineralization by calcifying organisms, including corals and algae. Ocean acidification poses a chr...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical aspidochirotid holothuroids are among the largest coral reef invertebrates, but gaps remain in our understanding of their ecological roles in lagoon sediment habitats, a vast component of coral-reef ecosystems. Stichopus herrmanni, listed as vulnerable (IUCN), is currently a major fishery species on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and through...
Article
The effects of global change on biological systems and functioning are already measurable, but how ecological interactions are being altered is poorly understood. Ecosystem resilience is strengthened by ecological functionality, which depends on trophic interactions between key species and resilience generated through biogenic buffering. Climate-dr...
Article
Crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci (COTS), predation is a major cause of coral reef decline, but the factors behind their population outbreaks remain unclear. Increased phytoplankton food resulting from eutrophication is suggested to enhance larval survival. We addressed the hypothesis that larval success is associated with particular chl...
Article
Populations of tropical sea cucumbers, harvested for bêche-de-mer, are in a perilous state of conservation, yet there remains a paucity of information on the biology of many harvested species. We examined the population biology of the commercially important curryfish, Stichopus herrmanni, across 2 years on Heron Reef, a protected zone in the Great...
Article
Ocean acidification has the potential to adversely affect marine calcifying organisms, with substantial ocean ecosystem impacts projected over the 21st century. Characterizing the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to natural variability in carbonate chemistry may improve our understanding of the long-term impacts of ocean acidification....
Article
Due to climatic warming, Asterias amurensis, a keystone boreal predatory seastar that has established extensive invasive populations in southern Australia, is a potential high-risk invader of the sub-Antarctic and Antarctic. To assess the potential range expansion of A. amurensis to the Southern Ocean as it warms, we investigated the bioclimatic en...
Article
The population biology of the curryfish, Stichopus herrmanni, was investigated at Heron Island in the Capricorn Bunker Group of the southern Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Heron Reef is of particular interest because it is a protected no-take area within the GBR Marine Park and is adjacent to areas where this species is fished. We report the...
Article
Full-text available
Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO3(2-)]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat t...
Article
Many echinoderm larvae exhibit phenotypic plasticity: a change in phenotype in response to environmental food levels. We investigated phenotypic plasticity in the larvae of the crown-of-thorns seastar Acanthaster planci, an opportunistic boom-and-bust species with larvae that have a strong response to food conditions. The increased predation pressu...
Article
Full-text available
High density populations of the crown-of-thorns seastar, Acanthaster planci, are a major contributor to the decline of coral reefs, however the causes behind periodic outbreaks of this species are not understood. The enhanced nutrients hypothesis posits that pulses of enhanced larval food in eutrophic waters facilitate metamorphic success with a fl...
Article
Full-text available
The thermal envelope of development to the larval stage of two echinoids from eastern Australia was characterized to determine whether they fill their potential latitudinal ranges as indicated by tolerance limits. The tropical sand dollar, Arachnoides placenta, a species that is not known to have shifted its range, was investigated in Townsville, n...
Article
Co-occurring ocean warming, acidification and reduced carbonate mineral saturation have significant impacts on marine biota, especially calcifying organisms. The effects of these stressors on development and calcification in newly metamorphosed juveniles (ca. 0.5 mm test diam) of the intertidal sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma, an ecologically...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Temperature and pH fluctuations in the intertidal rock pool habitat of juvenile Heliocidaris erythrogramma were monitored in situ during the time that the larvae settle out of the plankton and when the early post-metamorphic juveniles reside in the pools (summer to early-autumn). Temperatures varied up to 8˚C between diel cycles, with a minimum of...
Article
Temperature and pH fluctuations in the intertidal rock pooi habitat ofjuvenile Heliocidaris erythrogramma were monitored in situ during the time that the larvae settle out of the plankton and when the early post-metamorphic juveniles reside in the pools (summer to early-autumn). Temperatures varied up to 8°C between diel cycles, with a minimum of 1...
Article
Full-text available
Shell calcification in argonauts is unique. Only females of these cephalopods construct the paper nautilus shell, which is used as a brood chamber for developing embryos in the pelagic realm. As one of the thinnest (225 μm) known adult mollusc shells, and lacking an outer protective periostracum-like cover, this shell may be susceptible to dissolut...
Article
Shell calcification in argonauts is unique. Only females of these cephalopods construct the paper nautilus shell, which is used as a brood chamber for developing embryos in the pelagic realm. As one of the thinnest (225 μm) known adult mollusc shells, and lacking an outer protective periostracum-like cover, this shell may be susceptible to dissolut...
Article
Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful microscopic technique to characterise the crystallography of biomineralisation. Here, we use high-resolution EBSD to characterise one of the least studied shells in the ocean, the female argonaut brood chamber, and to examine the changes in shell microstructure in response to incubation in decre...

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Projects (2)
Project
Climate change exacerbates local stressors on coral reefs and threatens the very functioning of the Great Barrier Reef. We can think of a functioning ecosystem as one that resembles its natural state and is able to support key ecosystem goods and services such as maintaining biodiversity, productive fisheries and coastal protection from storms. While authorities employ a diversity of approaches to manage the reef, it is important to ask whether key functions are adequately protected.