Kelly Reed

Kelly Reed
Oxford Brookes University · School of Architecture

Doctor of Philosophy

About

37
Publications
9,699
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
286
Citations
Citations since 2017
32 Research Items
283 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents new archaeobotanical data from the Lower Cerovačka Cave located in Dalmatia, Croatia. At the site a high density of carbonized plant remains was recovered, indicating the remnants of a burnt crop store dating to the Late Bronze Age. Overall, the assemblage is dominated by lentil (Lens culinaris) and free-threshing wheat (Triticu...
Article
The Bronze Age in Europe is a dynamic time characterised by an increase in long-distance mobility and interaction, changes in social organisation, technological advancements and evolving agricultural practices. In particular, we see an increase in the range of crops grown from the middle Bronze Age, including the introduction of new crops, such as...
Research
Full-text available
This paper presents a detailed examination of finds of ‘new glume wheat’ (NGW), recognised as a member of the Triticum timopheevii wheat group, at Late Neolithic sites in Croatia. Increasing evidence of this morphotype from prehistoric sites across Europe, as well as comparative studies of modern Timopheev's wheat, provide a range of comparative ma...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the results from archaeobotanical remains collected from ten medieval settlements and fort sites in the region of present-day Slavonia, Croatia. From the 12th century ad , Slavonia was part of the Kingdom of Hungary, although the region benefited from a certain amount of autonomy. Examining the archaeobotanical data from this pe...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeobotanical investigations at the Roman town of Aelia Mursa, located near the Danube frontier in modern day Croatia, have revealed an extraordinary assemblage of food remains from a series of pits dated to the early 2nd century ad . The site yielded a wide array of economically important food remains, including staples such as Hordeum (barley)...
Article
Food has played a central role in death rituals throughout human history, yet finding evidence of these practices in the archaeological record can be problematic. In particular, linking charred plant remains to inhumation burials requires careful consideration of the taphonomic processes involved. Here we focus on the recovery of charred plant macr...
Article
Full-text available
The impact of human activity on the planet cannot be understated. Food systems are at the centre of a tangled web of interactions affecting all life. They are a complex nexus that directly and indirectly affects, and is affected by, a diverse set of social, environmental and technological phenomena. The complexity and often intractability of these...
Article
Full-text available
Bronze Age agriculture in Europe is marked by the adoption of new crops, such as broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum), broad bean (Vicia faba) and gold-of-pleasure (Camelina sativa). Yet, at a regional level, it is sometimes unclear when, where and why these crops are adopted and whether they were all adopted at the same time. Croatia is one such r...
Article
Research on food has a long history in archaeology and anthropology, with many agreeing that we need to examine the food of complex societies in a more holistic way, through the various stages from production to disposal. Typically, this has occurred through the application of the concept of foodways, although this has a range of definitions and is...
Article
Full-text available
OPEN-ACCESS, SEE https://rdcu.be/b6e3t FOR FULL LIST OF AUTHORS Broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) is not one of the founder crops domesticated in Southwest Asia in the early Holocene, but was domesticated in northeast China by 6000 BC. In Europe, millet was reported in Early Neolithic contexts formed by 6000 BC, but recent radiocarbon dating...
Article
Full-text available
Food is an excellent medium through which to explore trade, economies, migration and landscapes, yet little is known about food production and consumption in the Roman province of Pannonia. Here we explore the current evidence for agriculture, trade and diet in southern Pannonia (modern day eastern Croatia) and what this may say about life in the r...
Article
This paper examines three early medieval ritual house deposits from Bribirska glavica, Dalmatia, Croatia. Discovered over the last century these items bring to the fore questions regarding the relationship between state and secular religion in a region that experienced numerous encounters and confrontations within and between different social group...
Article
A programme developed across five UK universities aims to equip graduate professionals with the skills, tools and capabilities to better understand and manage food-system complexity for food security, for the environment and for enterprise.
Article
Full-text available
Cereals were a significant part of the Roman diet, yet knowledge about their cultivation, distribution and consumption in certain regions is particularly lacking. In Europe, studies generally suggest that from the Iron Age to the Roman period there was a reduction in barley cultivation, an increase in spelt over emmer, a preference for free-threshi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cultivation of broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) was a widespread practice in later European prehistory. When and how this ‘crop from the East’ was introduced to the continent and spread across it has not been determined. So far, based on the relative chronology of millet finds and a small set of radiocarbon-dated caryopses, it has been sugge...
Article
Perspectives from the recent and ancient past are largely underutilized in modern sustainability or food systems studies. However, information about regional crop histories and land use systems through time can add essential value and context to debates concerning future agricultural strategies and food security. In particular, archaeological and a...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents archaeobotanical evidence of rice (Oryza cf. sativa L.) and black pepper (Piper nigrum) recovered from an early 2nd century AD septic pit excavated near the centre of colonia Aelia Mursa (Osijek, Croatia). Within Roman Panonnia the archaeobotanical record shows evidence of trade consisting mostly of local Mediterranean goods suc...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the results from an archaeological excavation at the Neolithic site of Rašinovac, near Ždrapanj in the Piramatovci Valley (in the hinterland of the town of Skradin in Northern Dalmatia). This previously unknown site was test excavated in 2013 when a 2x2-metre trench was opened to determine the site’s stratigraphy and chronology....
Article
Mala (Nova) Pećina cave is located in Croatia, in the Dalmatian Hinterland (Dalmatinska Zagora), a mountainous region which is the contact zone between the eastern Adriatic coast and the interior. The excavations in Mala Pećina uncovered an Early and Late Neolithic cave site that might be key for a better understanding of the relationship between t...
Article
The recovery of new plant remains from eastern Croatia are discussed here in order to determine their ritual significance and how this evidence may fit into chronological and regional observations on ritual plant offerings in the Roman world. Samples collected from inhumations, cremations and an altar dedicated to Silvanus Domesticus, dating from t...
Article
This paper presents archaeobotanical data from three late Neolithic Sopot Culture (c. 5200–4000 cal BC) tell sites, Sopot, Slavča and Ravnjaš, located in eastern Croatia. Tell settlements are well suited for exploring aspects of diet and subsistence, as they present a concentrated area with successive generations building upon previous occupation l...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents archaeobotanical data from three late Neolithic Sopot Culture (c. 5200–4000 cal BC) tell sites, Sopot, Slavča and Ravnjaš, located in eastern Croatia. Tell settlements are well suited for exploring aspects of diet and subsistence, as they present a concentrated area with successive generations building upon previous occupation l...
Article
Full-text available
Mala (Nova) Pećina cave is located in Croatia, in the Dalmatian Hinterland (Dalmatinska Zagora), a mountainous region which is the contact zone between the eastern Adriatic coast and the interior. The excavations in Mala Pećina uncovered an Early and Late Neolithic cave site that might be key for a better understanding of the relationship between t...
Article
Full-text available
The Copper Age in the Carpathian Basin is marked by a distinct change in settlement patterns, material culture, social traditions and subsistence practices; however, few studies address the nature of crop cultivation in the region. This paper examines new archaeobotanical data from 13 Copper Age (ca. 4500–2500 cal BC) sites located in continental C...
Article
Full-text available
There is an urgent need to train a cohort of professionals who can address and resolve the increasing number of fundamental failings in the global food system. The solutions to these systemic failings go far beyond the production of food, and are embedded within broad political, economic, business, social, cultural and environmental contexts. The c...
Article
Full-text available
The archaeobotanical remains from Velištak are the first evidence of plant economies from an open-air settlement dating to the late Neolithic Hvar culture in Croatia (c. 4900–4000 cal BC). The results presented here are from the 2007–2013 field seasons. Based on an examination of carbonised macro-remains, it is suggested that emmer, einkorn, and ba...
Article
Full-text available
The beginning of farming in Croatia (ca. 6000 cal BC) is little understood and few archaeobotanical studies have been conducted to explore the nature of subsistence economies at this time. This paper presents new archaeobotanical data from the middle Neolithic site of Danilo Bitinj and the early/middle Neolithic site of Pokrovnik, providing a signi...
Article
Recent excavations at Sisak, Croatia, unearthed an Early Iron Age pot filled with archaeobotanical remains within the floor of a structure dating to between the sixth and fourth centuries BC. Burnt in situ the archaeobotanical remains provide unique evidence for diet and agriculture in a region where archaeobotanical evidence is rare. The prelimina...
Book
Full-text available
Feudvar bei Mošorin ist eine mehrschichtige Burgsiedlung der Bronzezeit und frühen Eisenzeit im Mündungsgebiet der Theiß in die Donau (Serbien). Mit 2173 archäobotanischen Proben hat die Siedlung einen der umfangreichsten archäobotanischen Datenpools der prähistorischen Metallzeiten Südosteuropas geliefert. In zwei separaten Studien von Helmut Krol...
Article
Until recently the recovery of plant remains in Croatia was rare, resulting in few studies addressing the nature of Neolithic crop cultivation. This paper presents new archaeobotanical data from eleven Neolithic settlements in coastal and continental Croatia. Within continental Croatia, three sites dating to the Starčevo culture (early/middle Neoli...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project