Keith A. Wilson

Keith A. Wilson
University of Oslo · Department of Philosophy, Classics, History of Art and Ideas

Ph.D., M.Litt.

About

12
Publications
4,345
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39
Citations
Introduction
Keith A. Wilson is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow on the Perceiving Representations project at the University of Oslo. Keith does research in Philosophy of Mind and Perception. His most recent publication is an annotated bibliography on ’The Senses’ for Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - present
University of Oslo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2017 - January 2019
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • Fellow
June 2017 - September 2017
University of Glasgow
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (12)
Chapter
Full-text available
Many philosophers and scientists take perceptual experience, whatever else it involves, to be representational. That is, to perceive an object via one or more of our senses is to represent it as being some particular way: that tomato is red, round, sweet, and so on. In ‘The Silence of the Senses’, Charles Travis (2004; 2013) argues that this view i...
Article
Full-text available
The dual role of olfaction in both smelling and tasting, i.e. flavour perception, makes it an important test case for philosophical theories of sensory individuation. Indeed, the psychologist Paul Rozin claimed that olfaction is a “dual sense”, leading some scientists and philosophers to propose that we have not one, but two senses of smell: orthon...
Preprint
Full-text available
It is generally accepted that there is a visual field, but the analogous notion of an auditory field is rejected by many philosophers on the grounds that the metaphysics or phenomenology of audition lack the necessary spatial structure. In this paper, I argue that many of the common objections to the existence of an auditory field are misguided and...
Article
Full-text available
Each of our sensory modalities — vision, touch, taste, etc. — works on a slightly different timescale, with differing temporal resolutions and processing lag. This raises the question of how, or indeed whether, these sensory streams are co-ordinated or ‘bound’ into a coherent multisensory experience of the perceptual ‘now’. In this paper I evaluate...
Article
Full-text available
Visual perception is widely taken to present properties such as redness, round-ness, and so on. This in turn might be thought to give rise to accuracy conditions for experience, and so content, regardless of which metaphysical view of perception one endorses. An influential version of this argument-Susanna Siegel's 'Argument from Appearing'-aims to...
Article
Philosophers and scientists have studied sensory perception and, in particular, vision for many years. Increasingly, however, they have become interested in the nonvisual senses in greater detail and the problem of individuating the senses in a more general way. The Aristotelian view is that there are only five external senses—smell, taste, hearing...
Article
In his account of visual perception, Thomas Reid describes visible figure as both ‘real and external’ to the eye and as the ‘immediate object of sight’. These claims appear to conflict with Reid's direct realism, since if the ‘immediate’ object of vision is also its direct object, then sight would be perceptually indirect due to the role of visible...
Thesis
Full-text available
Many philosophers have held that perceptual experience is fundamentally a matter of perceivers being in particular representational states. Such states are said to have representational content, i.e. accuracy or veridicality conditions, capturing the way that things, according to that experience, appear to be. In this thesis I argue that the case a...
Thesis
Full-text available
Throughout everyday experience, we take ourselves to be aware of events as occurring in a certain order or sequence, as having some particular duration, and of progressing from future to present and into the past. Yet such seemingly innocuous temporal phenomena are the source of many philosophical puzzles—not least the question of how such an aware...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The Perceiving Representations project will conduct a unified examination of our perception of three different forms of representation: language, pictures and music.