Keenan Stears

Keenan Stears
University of California, Santa Barbara | UCSB · Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology

PhD Ecological Sciences

About

19
Publications
6,438
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
260
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2016 - present
University of California, Santa Barbara
Position
  • Researcher
June 2015 - present
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Ad hoc lecturer for a third year level course: Population and Community Ecology.
January 2015 - June 2015
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Predation risk of individuals moving in multispecies herds may be lower due to the heightened ability of the different species to detect predators (i.e., mixed-species effect). The giraffe is the tallest land mammal, maintains high vigilance levels, and has good eyesight. As a result, heterospecific herd members could reduce their predation risk if...
Article
Full-text available
For many animals, a key benefit of group living is lowered predation risk. With increasing group size, individuals commonly reduce vigilance. This group size effect can arise from both dilution of risk and increased collective detection. To determine which was more important, we compared vigilance levels of plains zebra, Equus quagga, in areas inha...
Article
Full-text available
Two key factors that influence the foraging behaviour of group-living herbivores are food availability and individual dominance status. Yet, how the combination of these factors influences the patch-joining decisions of individuals foraging within groups has scarcely been explored. To address this, we focused on the patch-joining decisions of group...
Article
Full-text available
Differences in food availability and predation risk can influence how herbivores use landscapes. As a result, trade-offs between costs and benefits can influence habitat and patch selection. To determine how oribi antelope, Ourebia ourebi, weigh up costs and benefits when making habitat and patch level foraging decisions, we measured giving-up dens...
Article
Recent increases in human disturbance pose significant threats to migratory species using collective movement strategies. Key threats to migrants may differ depending on behavioural traits (e.g. collective navigation), taxonomy and the environmental system (i.e. freshwater, marine or terrestrial) associated with migration. We quantitatively assess...
Article
Full-text available
African savannas are experiencing anthropogenically-induced stressors that are accelerating the increase of woody vegetation cover. To combat this, land managers frequently implement large-scale clearing of trees, which can have a cascading influence on mammalian herbivores. Studies rarely focus on how differences in woody cover influence the herbi...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, anthrax outbreaks pose a serious threat to people, livestock, and wildlife. Furthermore, environmental change can exacerbate these outbreak dynamics by altering the host–pathogen relationship. However, little is known about how the quantitative spatial dynamics of host movement and environmental change may affect the spread of Bacillus an...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies on the coexistence of wildlife with livestock have focused primarily on similar-sized species. Furthermore, many of these studies have used dietary overlap as a measure of potential competition between interacting species and thus lack the important link between dietary overlap and any negative effects on a particular species–a prerequ...
Article
Comparison across terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems facilitates a broader understanding of ecological patterns. Although meta-analyses are important for quantitative synthesis across ecosystems, detailed comparisons of natural history and species interactions also illuminate convergence among systems. We compare the ecology of superficially dissim...
Article
Prey anti-predator behaviours are influenced by perceived predation risk in a landscape and social information gleaned from herd mates regarding predation risk. It is well documented that high-quality social information about risk can come from heterospecific herd mates. Here, we integrate social information with the landscape of fear to quantify h...
Article
Full-text available
The obligate dependency of the common hippopotamus, Hippopotamus amphibius, on water makes them particularly vulnerable to hydrological disturbances. Despite the threats facing this at-risk species, there is a lack of information regarding H. amphibius spatial ecology. We used high-resolution tracking data of male H. amphibius to assess home range...
Article
Full-text available
Cross-boundary transfers of nutrients can profoundly shape the ecology of recipient systems. The common hippopotamus, Hippopotamus amphibius, is a significant vector of such subsidies from terrestrial to river ecosystems. We compared river pools with high and low densities of H. amphibius to determine how H. amphibius subsidies shape the chemistry...
Article
Group-living animals use social information when making patch-joining/ scrounging decisions. However, the extent to which they use finder’s share (i.e. amount of food eaten in a patch before other individuals arrive) as a cue when making these decisions is unknown. It is likely that the removal of finder’s share decreases patch attractiveness to sc...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The main goals of this research are to 1) gain a better understanding of how common African savanna prey species can use dilution and detection to reduce their predation risk, 2) determine how this varies across a predation pressure gradient, and 3) explore the information-competition trade-off made by prey species.