Keegan R Selig

Keegan R Selig
American Museum of Natural History

PhD in Evolutionary Anthropology (University of Toronto)

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19
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Publications

Publications (19)
Article
The fossil record of treeshrews, hedgehogs, and other micromammals from the Lower Siwaliks of India is sparse. Here, we report on a new genus and species of fossil treeshrew, specimens of the hedgehog Galerix , and other micromammals from the middle Miocene (Lower Siwalik) deposits surrounding Ramnagar (Udhampur District, Jammu and Kashmir), at a f...
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Variation in postcanine teeth is relevant to answering questions about both taxonomy and diet. In such contexts, understanding the patterns and the amounts of variation present in a single species is fundamentally important. Here we use dental topographic analysis (DTA) to study variation in functional aspects of the lower second molar (n = 51) and...
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Dental cavities or caries is a common disease among modern humans, affecting almost every adult. Caries frequency has been used to study dietary change in humans over time, based on an inferred tie between the incidence of caries and a carbohydrate-rich diet. However, the disease is not unique to our species. Among non-human primates, there is also...
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Microsyopidae is a family of plesiadapiforms known from over 1500 stratigraphically controlled specimens from the southern Bighorn Basin of Wyoming spanning the first three million years of the early Eocene. The early Eocene is characterized by rapid fluctuations in climate during the period represented by this collection of microsyopids, making th...
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The early Eocene of the southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, is notable for its nearly continuous record of mammalian fossils. Microsyopinae (?Primates) is one of several lineages that shows evidence of evolutionary change associated with an interval referred to as Biohorizon A. Arctodontomys wilsoni is replaced by a larger species, Arctodontomys nuptu...
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Objectives: One role of dental pulp is in the upkeep and maintenance of dentine. Under wear, odontoblasts in the pulp deposit tertiary dentine to ensure the sensitive internal dental tissues are not exposed and vulnerable to infection. It follows that there may be an adaptive advantage for increasing molar pulp volume in anthropoid primate taxa th...
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Identifying developmental explanations for the evolution of complex structures like mammalian molars is fundamental to studying phenotypic variation. Previous study showed that a “morphogenetic gradient” of molar proportions was explained by a balance between inhibiting/activating activity from earlier developing molars, termed the inhibitory casca...
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Treeshrews are small, Indomalayan mammals closely related to primates. Previously, three-dimensional geometric morphometric analyses were used to assess patterns of treeshrew lower second molar morphology, which showed that the positions of molar landmarks covary with intraordinal systematics. Another analysis used dental topographic metrics to tes...
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Gummivory poses unique challenges to the dentition as gum acquisition may often require that the anterior teeth be adapted to retain a sharp edge and to resist loading because they sometimes must penetrate a highly obdurate substrate during gum extraction by means of gouging or scraping. It has been observed previously that the enamel on the labial...
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Evolution, Ecology and Conservation of Lorises and Pottos - edited by K. A. I. Nekaris March 2020
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Evolution, Ecology and Conservation of Lorises and Pottos - edited by K. A. I. Nekaris March 2020
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Molar morphology plays a key role in the systematics and behavioral interpretation of fossil taxa, so understanding the developmental patterns that shape occlusal morphology in modern taxa is of central importance to informing analysis of the fossil record. The shape of the outer enamel surface (OES) of a tooth is largely the result of the forming...
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The ecology, and particularly the diet, of treeshrews (order Scandentia) is poorly understood compared to that of their close relatives, the primates. This stems partially from treeshrews having fast food transit times through the gut, meaning fecal and stomach samples only represent a small portion of the foodstuffs consumed in a given day. Moreov...
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Plesiadapiforms, appearing near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, represent the first primate radiation and show a diverse array of tooth morphologies. Dental topographic metrics provide quantitative data on occlusal surface shape. We used three metrics, Dirichlet Normal Energy, Relief Index, and 3D Orientation Patch Count Rotated, to assess chang...

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