Kazuki Tsuji

Kazuki Tsuji
University of the Ryukyus · Faculty of Agriculture

Doctor of Philosophy
Evolutionary ecology using social insects, butterflies, and freshwater fish

About

202
Publications
27,214
Reads
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3,505
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2001 - November 2013
University of the Ryukyus
Position
  • Professor (Full)
July 1993 - June 1995
University of Wuerzburg
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (202)
Article
Full-text available
The positive association between disturbances and biological invasions is a widely observed ecological pattern in the Anthropocene. Such patterns have been hypothesized to be driven by the superior competitive ability of invaders or by modified environments, as well as by the interaction of these factors. An experimental study that tests these hypo...
Article
Human activity has facilitated the introduction of many exotic species via global trade. Asia-Pacific countries comprise one of the most economically and trade-active regions in the world, which makes it one of the most vulnerable regions to invasive species, including ants. There are currently over 60 exotic ant species in the Asia-Pacific, with t...
Article
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Sex allocation is one of the most studied traits in evolutionary biology because its theoretical predictions match the empirical data. Here, using the Ryukyu dry-wood termite Neotermes sugioi, we investigated several factors that could bias the sex allocation in three populations (Okinawa, Ishigaki/Iriomote, and Yonaguni). Our survey showed that th...
Article
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Convergent evolution of eusociality with the division of reproduction and its plastic transition in Hymenoptera has long attracted the attention of researchers. To explain the evolutionary scenario of the reproductive division of labor, several hypotheses had been proposed. Among these, we focus on the most basic concepts, i.e., the ovarian ground...
Article
Full-text available
We report comprehensive evidence for obligatory thelytokous parthenogenesis in an ant Monomorium triviale . This species is characterized by distinct queen–worker dimorphism with strict reproductive division of labor: queens produce both workers and new queens without mating, whereas workers are completely sterile. We collected 333 nests of this sp...
Article
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Sexual conflict can result in coercive mating. Because males bear low costs of heterospecific mating, coercive males may engage in misdirected mating attempts toward heterospecific females. In contrast, sexual selection through consensual mate choice can cause mate recognition cues among species to diverge, leading to more accurate species recognit...
Preprint
Full-text available
We report comprehensive evidence for obligatory thelytokous parthenogenesis in an ant Monomorium triviale . This species is characterized by distinct queen–worker dimorphism with strict reproductive division of labor: queens produce both workers and new queens without mating, whereas workers are completely sterile. We collected 333 nests of this sp...
Article
Full-text available
Batesian mimicry is a striking example of Darwinian evolution, in which a mimetic species resembles toxic or unpalatable model species, thereby receiving protection from predators. In some species exhibiting Batesian mimicry, nonmimetic individuals coexist as polymorphism in the same population despite the benefits of mimicry. In a previous study,...
Article
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Spillover of honey bee viruses have posed a significant threat to pollination services, triggering substantial effort in determining the host range of the viruses as an attempt to understand the transmission dynamics. Previous studies have reported infection of honey bee viruses in ants, raising the concern of ants serving as a reservoir host. Most...
Article
Batesian mimicry, in which harmless organisms resemble unpalatable or harmful species, is a well‐studied adaptation for predation avoidance. The females of some Batesian mimic species comprise mimetic and nonmimetic individuals. Mimetic females of such polymorphic species clearly have a selective advantage due to decreased predation pressure, but t...
Article
Evolutionary ecological theory suggests that selection arising from interactions with conspecifics, such as sexual and kin selection, may result in evolution of intraspecific conflicts and evolutionary ‘tragedy of the commons’. Here, we propose that such an evolution of conspecific conflicts may affect population dynamics in a way that enhances spe...
Article
A program to eradicate the West Indian sweet potato weevil Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire, 1849) by using the sterile insect technique is currently in progress in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. The survival and oviposition performance of E. postfasciatus females are known to be increased when the number of males is reduced in experimental population...
Article
Since it first secured a foothold in the southern United States in the 1930s from its native South America, the red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren has now spread to more than 20 countries and territories. We update the status of S. invicta in Australia, China and Taiwan and discuss the invasion threat posed to other countries in the reg...
Article
Aggression toward competitors is a useful measure of resource ownership and defense in animals, but aggressive behavior is costly. Therefore, it is predicted that animals will display aggression only when the expected benefit to individual fitness exceeds the expected cost. In ants, when conspecific individuals belonging to different colonies encou...
Article
Full-text available
Batesian mimicry is a well‐studied adaptation for predation avoidance, in which a mimetic species resembles an unpalatable model species. Batesian mimicry can be under positive selection because of the protection gained against predators, due to resemblance to unpalatable model species. However, in some mimetic species, nonmimetic individuals are p...
Article
Full-text available
The eradication of invasive exotic species is desirable but often infeasible. Here, we show that male guppies are a potential biological agent for eradicating invasive mosquitofish through the mechanism of reproductive interference, which is defined as any sexual behavior erratically directed at a different species that damages female and/or male f...
Article
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Identifying traits that facilitate species introductions and successful invasions of ecosystems represents a key issue in ecology. Following their establishment into new environments, many non‐native species exhibit phenotypic plasticity with post‐introduction changes in behavior, morphology or life history traits that allow them to overcome the pr...
Article
We investigated colony-level foraging activities of Diacamma sp., a queenless ponerine ant, in the field. Our aim was to elucidate the presence of any pattern in foraging activity in field colonies in relation to: (1) circadian rhythm, (2) physical environmental conditions such as extreme temperatures, (3) seasonality, and (4) short-term foraging e...
Article
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Wing polymorphism of butterflies provides a good system in which to study adaptation. The Asian Batesian mimic butterfly Papilio polytes has unmelanized, putative mimetic red spots on its black hind wings. The size of those red spots is non-heritable but it is highly polymorphic, the adaptive significance of which is unknown. We hypothesized that u...
Article
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Article
Full-text available
Invasion of the red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren causes destructive effects to native biodiversity, agriculture, and public health. Due to its aggressive foraging behavior and high reproductive capability, the fire ant has established wild populations in most of the imported regions. The key to successful eradication is thorough monit...
Article
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Altruism is a paradox in Darwinian evolution. Policing is an important mechanism of the evolution and maintenance of altruism. A recently developed dynamic game model incorporating colony demography and inclusive fitness predicts that, in hymenopteran social insects, policing behaviour enforcing reproductive altruism in group members depends strong...
Article
The mutualistic association between ants and hemipterans is often facultative and can be affected by the availability of other food sources. In the present study we tested whether the tending behavior of the big-headed ant, Pheidole megacephala (Fabricius), had a negative impact on the pink pineapple mealybug, Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell), when...
Article
In insects, seminal fluid proteins that are produced by male accessory glands and transferred to females during mating have key functions in sperm competition and sperm physiology that lead to male reproductive success. In ants, male reproductive success also depends on the longevity of sperm stored in the queen's spermatheca because their sexual o...
Article
Full-text available
Females of social Hymenoptera only mate at the beginning of their adult lives and produce offspring until their death. In most ant species, queens live for over a decade, indicating that ant queens can store large numbers of spermatozoa throughout their long lives. To reveal the prolonged sperm storage mechanisms, we identified enriched genes in th...
Article
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Batesian mimicry, a phenomenon in which harmless organisms resemble harmful or unpalatable species, has been extensively studied in evolutionary biology. Model species may differ from population to population of a single mimetic species, so different predation pressures might have driven micro-evolution towards better mimicry among regions. However...
Article
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Invasions are ecologically destructive and can threaten biodiversity. Trophic flexibility has been proposed as a mechanism facilitating invasion, with more flexible species better able to invade. The termite hunting needle ant Brachyponera chinensis was introduced from East Asia to the United States where it disrupts native ecosystems. We show that...
Article
Partner discrimination is crucial in mutualistic interactions between organisms to counteract cheating by the partner. Trophobiosis between ants and aphids is a model system of such mutualistic interaction. To establish and maintain the mutualistic association, ants need to correctly discriminate mutualistic aphids. However, the mechanism by which...
Article
In group-living animals, social interactions influence various traits including circadian activity. Maternal care, in particular, can have a strong effect on the circadian activity of parents or nurses across taxa. In social insects, nestmates are known to have diverse activity rhythms; however, what kind of social environment is crucial in shaping...
Article
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How individual organisms whose behavior is potentially driven by selfish interests cooperate to form a society is a central question in evolutionary biology. Worker reproduction and its suppression in eusocial insects provide an illuminating model of such a conflict resolution. Although many theoretical and empirical studies focus on the nature and...
Article
Queen-worker differentiation in eusocial organisms may have originated from decoupling of maternal care and reproductive behaviors. Recent advances in sequencing techniques have begun to elucidate the molecular basis of queen-worker differentiation. However, current knowledge of the molecular basis of caste differentiation is limited, especially to...
Article
The ponerine ant Brachyponera chinensis was introduced to the USA, where it has become invasive. Although various ecological data have been collected for B. chinensis populations in the USA, most aspects concerning the biology and ecology of native populations in Japan, a presumed origin, remain unknown. Here we investigated the social structure an...
Article
Full-text available
Background Reproductive division of labor in eusocial insects is a striking example of a shared genetic background giving rise to alternative phenotypes, namely queen and worker castes. Queen and worker phenotypes play major roles in the evolution of eusocial insects. Their behavior, morphology and physiology underpin many ecologically relevant col...