Kazuki Sekine

Kazuki Sekine
Waseda University | Sōdai · Faculty of Human Sciences

Ph.D. (Psychology)

About

35
Publications
7,392
Reads
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356
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
295 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Introduction
My background is developmental psychology, and I have been working on the development of gestures and language, mainly in children. I am currently focusing on the following three projects, 1) integration of speech and gesture in production and comprehension, 2) Cultural influence on developmental of gesture and language, and 3) Gestures by people with aphasia.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - March 2020
Keio University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
November 2016 - October 2018
Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
Position
  • Research Associate
November 2016 - October 2018
Radboud University
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
April 2003 - March 2010
Shirayuri College
Field of study
  • Psychology
March 2001 - March 2003
Shirayuri College
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
This study compares words and gestures produced in a controlled experimental setting by children raised in different linguistic/cultural environments to examine the robustness of gesture use at an early stage of lexical development. Twenty-two Italian and twenty-two Japanese toddlers (age range 25–37 months) performed the same picture- naming task....
Article
Full-text available
Background: Gesture frequently accompanies speech in healthy speakers. For many individuals with aphasia, gestures are a target of speech-language pathology intervention, either as an alternative form of communication or as a facilitative device for language restoration. The patterns of gesture production for people with aphasia and the partici- pa...
Article
We examined whether children's ability to integrate speech and gesture follows the pattern of a broader developmental shift between 3- and 5-year-old children (Ramscar & Gitcho, 2007) regarding the ability to process two pieces of information simultaneously. In Experiment 1, 3-year-olds, 5-year-olds, and adults were presented with either an iconic...
Article
This study examined how well 5-, 6-, 10-year-olds and adults integrated information from spoken discourse with cohesive use of space in gesture, in comprehension. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with a combination of spoken discourse and a sequence of cohesive gestures, which consistently located each of the two protagonists in two dis...
Article
Full-text available
Children perceive iconic gestures, along with speech they hear. Previous studies have shown that children integrate information from both modalities. Yet it is not known whether children can integrate both types of information simultaneously as soon as they are available (as adults do) or whether they initially process them separately and integrate...
Article
Full-text available
Co-speech hand gestures are a ubiquitous form of nonverbal communication, which can express additional information that is not present in speech. Hand gestures may become more relevant when verbal production is impaired, as in speakers with post-stroke aphasia. In fact, speakers with aphasia produce more gestures than non-brain damaged speakers. Fu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Co-speech hand gestures are a ubiquitous form of nonverbal communication, which can express additional information that is not present in speech. Hand gestures may become more relevant when speech production is impaired as in patients with post-stroke aphasia. In fact, patients with aphasia produce more gestures than control speakers. Further, thei...
Article
Compelling evidence suggests observing iconic gestures benefits learning. While emerging evidence suggests typical iconic gestures benefit comprehension to a greater extent than atypical iconic gestures, it is unclear precisely when and for whom these gestures will be most helpful. The current study investigated factors that may moderate when and f...
Article
Full-text available
An emerging perspective on human cognition and performance sees it as a kind of self-organizing phenomenon involving dynamic coordination across the body, brain and environment. Measuring this coordination faces a major challenge. Time series obtained from such cognitive, behavioral, and physiological coordination are often complicated in terms of...
Article
The Auslan and Australian English archive and corpus is the first bilingual, multi-modal documentation of a deaf signed language (Auslan, the language of the Australian deaf community) and its ambient spoken language (Australian English). It aims to facilitate the direct comparison of face-to-face, multi-modal talk produced by deaf signers and hear...
Article
Full-text available
We examined gesture representation of motion events in narratives produced by three- and nine-year-olds, and adults. Two aspects of gestural depiction were analysed: how protagonists were depicted, and how gesture space was used. We found that older groups were more likely to express protagonists as an object that a gesturing hand held and manipula...
Article
This study examined spatial story representations created by speaker's cohesive gestures. Participants were presented with three-sentence discourse with two protagonists. In the first and second sentences, gestures consistently located the two protagonists in the gesture space: one to the right and the other to the left. The third sentence (without...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Human communication occurs through both verbal and visual/motoric modalities. Simultaneous conversational speech and gesture occurs across all cultures and age groups. When verbal communication is compromised, more of the communicative load can be transferred to the gesture modality. Although people with aphasia produce meaning-laden g...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Speakers sometimes modify their gestures during the process of production into adaptors such as hair touching or eye scratching. Such disguised adaptors are evidence that the speaker can monitor their gestures. In this study, we investigated when and how disguised adaptors are first produced by children. Sixty elementary school children participate...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Studies have shown that the gestures produced by people with aphasia (PWA) can convey information useful for their communication. However, the exact significance of the contribution to message communication via gesture remains unclear. Furthermore, it remains unclear how different gesture types and representation techniques impact messa...
Article
Full-text available
We examined how two-handed gestures and speech with equivalent contents that are used in narrative develop during childhood. The participants were 40 native speakers of English consisting of four different age groups: 3-, 5-, 9-year-olds, and adults. A set of 10 video clips depicting motion events were used to elicit speech and gesture. There are t...
Article
Full-text available
People have stereotypes about gesture usage. For instance, speakers in East Asia are not supposed to gesticulate, and it is believed that Italians gesticulate more than the British. Despite the prevalence of such views, studies that investigate these stereotypes are scarce. The present study examined people's views on spontaneous gestures by collec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Gesture can convey information co-occurring with and in the absence of speech. As such, it seems a useful strategy for people with aphasia (PWA) to compensate for their impaired speech. To find out whether gestures used by PWA add to the comprehensibility of their communication we looked at the information conveyed in gesture (similar to speech, ad...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: For many individuals with aphasia, gestures form a vital component of message transfer and are the target of speech-language pathology intervention. What remains unclear are the participant variables that predict successful outcomes from gesture treatments. The authors examined the gesture production of a large number of individuals with...
Conference Paper
What is the most essential in soccer is that a player’s orientation as to how s/he is about to play is expressed through bodily movements and becomes observable for other players in the process of game. And, this is not only true for soccer, but also for social interaction in general such as conversation. Therefore, it is indispensable for cognitiv...
Article
Full-text available
The present study investigates the functions of gestures in preschoolers' descrip-tions of activities. Specifically, utilizing McNeill's growth point theory (1992), I examine how gestures contribute to the creation of contrast from the immediate context in the spoken discourse of children. When preschool children describe an activity consisting of...
Chapter
Full-text available
This research investigated developmental changes in children’s representations of large-scale environments as reflected in spontaneous gestures and speech produced during route descriptions Four-, five-, and six-year-olds ( N = 122) described the route from their nursery school to their own homes. Analysis of the children’s gestures showed that som...
Chapter
Full-text available
This research investigated developmental changes in children’s representations of large-scale environments as reflected in spontaneous gestures and speech produced during route descriptions. Four-, five-, and six-year-olds (N = 122) described the route from their nursery school to their own homes. Analysis of the children’s gestures showed that som...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates the development of bi-modal reference maintenance by focusing on how Japanese elementary school children introduce and track animate referents in their narratives. Sixty elementary school children participated in this study, 10 from each school year (from 7 to 12 years of age). They were instructed to remember a cartoon and...
Article
Full-text available
This study longitudinally investigated developmental changes in the frame of reference used by children in their gestures and speech. Fifteen children, between 4 and 6 years of age, were asked once a year to describe their route home from their nursery school. When the children were 4 years old, they tended to produce gestures that directly and con...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies on developmental gestures have treated gestures in infant. In recent years, along the rise of the interest in the spontaneous gestures accompanied with the speech, researches on spontaneous gestures in preschool age have been accumulated. But little has been reported on systematic developmental change of spontaneous gestures in chi...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
https://brainandmultimodality.wordpress.com/home-2/ Children learn language in a multimodal environment in the sense that their caregivers interact with children in a variety of modalities such as eye gaze, gesture, and speech. Especially hand gestures are often used by caregivers to convey information with speech. Given that gestures often carry information that the co-occurring speech does not convey, gestures are an important medium for children to understand speakers’ messages. This leads us to address the question of how children process a speaker’s gesture and speech. In our current project we examine neurocognitive processing of semantic information from gesture and speech in children and adults by using neuroimaging techniques such as EEG (‘About our EEG experiment‘). This project will contribute to the research of multimodal communication by providing neurobiological data on how gesture and speech are processed in children and adults.