Kazuhiro Goto

Kazuhiro Goto
Sagami Women's University · Department of Human Psychology

PhD (Psychology)

About

36
Publications
5,903
Reads
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425
Citations
Citations since 2016
7 Research Items
182 Citations
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Introduction
My research interests are in the general area of animal cognition. In particular, I am interested in visual perception, attention, and memory. Many bird species are, like humans, visually dominant, but some aspects of visual perception seem to be different between birds and humans. I investigate how visual perception differs between these two taxa. However, due to the difficulty of conducting experiments on birds at our university, I am currently working on research using visual stimuli in mice.
Additional affiliations
April 2017 - present
Sagami Women's University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
April 2012 - March 2017
Sagami Women's University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
May 2009 - March 2012
Kyoto University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
October 2001 - June 2004
University of Exeter
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Visual search for complex natural targets requires focal attention, either cued by predictive stimulus associations or primed by a representation of the most recently detected target. Because both processes can focus visual attention, cuing and priming were compared in an operant search task to evaluate their relative impacts on performance and to...
Article
Left-right (L-R) asymmetry is a fundamental feature of brain function, but the mechanisms underlying functional asymmetry remain largely unknown. We previously identified structural and functional asymmetries in the circuitry of the mouse hippocampus that result from the asymmetrical distribution of NMDA receptor GluR ε2 (NR2B) subunits. By examini...
Article
We previously demonstrated that chimpanzees, like humans, showed better accuracy and faster response time in discriminating visual patterns when the patterns were presented in redundant and uninformative contexts than when they were presented alone. In the present study, we examined the effect of redundant context on pattern discrimination in pigeo...
Article
Full-text available
Detecting global patterns in the environment is essential to object perception and recognition. Consistent with this, pigeons have been shown to readily detect and locate geometrically arranged, structured targets embedded in randomized backgrounds. Here we show for the first time that pigeons can detect and localize trial-unique targets derived so...
Article
Full-text available
We have previously demonstrated that chimpanzees, similar to humans, can discriminate the orientations of a diagonal line better when lines are presented in redundant contexts than alone. In the present study, we examined whether the same redundant context facilitated diagonal-orientation discrimination in mice. Mice were presented one of three sim...
Article
Full-text available
Automated touchscreen-based tasks are increasingly being used to explore a broad range of issues in learning and behavior in mice. Researchers usually report how they train mice before acquiring a target task concisely, and shaping protocols at this stage are typically flexible. In this report, we described a training protocol, developed in our lab...
Article
Full-text available
This paper considers methodological problems in animal metacognition studies. After summarizing a variety of experimental designs to study animal metacognition, we review recent literature that were not included in Fujita (2010)'s more comprehensive review. We then examined Carruthers (2008; Carruthers and Rithie 2012)' skeptic argument a...
Article
Full-text available
Biological motion point-light displays provide a powerful method for studying motion perception. Nonhuman animals are capable of discriminating point-light displays, but it remains unknown how they perceive biological motion in these displays. We trained two groups of pigeons to discriminate video stimuli using two different classification rules. T...
Article
Sound localization in the horizontal plane is mainly determined by interaural time differences (ITD) and interaural level differences (ILD). Both cues result in an estimate of sound source location and in many real-life situations these two cues are roughly congruent. When stimulating listeners with head phones it is possible to counterbalance the...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory distance judgment relies on several acoustic cues and can be modulated by visual information. Sound intensity serves as one such cue as it decreases with increasing distance. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiment, we tested whether N1m MEG responses, previously described to scale with sound intensity, are modulated by visual dist...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the perceptions of emergent configurations in humans and chimpanzees using a target-localization task. The stimulus display consisted of a target placed among multiple identical distractors. The target and distractors were presented either solely, within congruent contexts in which salient configurations emerge, or within incongruent co...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropomorphim is an enduring controversy in comparative cognition. Some studies in comparative cognition search for human-like behavior as evidence for evolutionary continuity of mental processes as Darwin encouraged. Others eschew interpreting observed behaviors in terms of anthropomorphic mental processes. Even in the former cases, students of...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence of metamemory, the ability to monitor one's own memory, has been obtained in some primates, but it appears to be weaker in other species. In this study, we examined whether crows flexibly modulate their behavior by monitoring the strength of memory trace in a delayed matching-to-sample task using two paradigms. First, crows performing a me...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of picture manipulations on humans' and pigeons' performance were examined in a go/no-go discrimination of two perceptually similar categories, cat and dog faces. Four types of manipulation were used to modify the images. Mosaicization and scrambling were used to produce degraded versions of the training stimuli, while morphing and cell...
Article
Full-text available
Although left-right (L-R) asymmetry is a fundamental feature of higher-order brain function, little is known about how asymmetry defects of the brain affect animal behavior. Previously, we identified structural and functional asymmetries in the circuitry of the mouse hippocampus resulting from the asymmetrical distribution of NMDA receptor GluR ε2...
Article
Delayed matching-to-sample is one of the most frequently employed behavioral tasks for assessing spatial working memory in animals. Although the advantages of the task have been widely acknowledged and it is used in the study of a variety of species, its application to mice has been rare. In the present study, we reported the efficacy of a delayed...
Article
Full-text available
Primates and birds are visually dominant species. Recent comparative studies in visual perception address questions about the differences between humans and nonhuman primates, as well as primates and birds. This paper discusses the relative importance of global and local visual processing in primates and birds. Although most nonhuman animals, unlik...
Article
Abstract We examined the capacity of visual working memory in three male jungle crows using an operant delayed matching-to-sample procedure. In the delayed matching-to-sample, each trial started with the presentation of a sample stimulus, followed by the presentation of comparison stimuli after a delay interval. The choice of the matching compariso...
Article
Full-text available
In Experiment 1, each of three humans knowledgeable about operant schedules used mouse clicks to respond to a "work key" presented on a monitor. On a random half of the presentations, work-key responses that completed a variable ratio (VR) 12 produced a tone. After five tones, the work key was replaced by two report keys. Pressing the right or left...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the contribution of stimulus processing to animal logics. In the classic functionalist S-O-R view of learning (and cognition), stimuli provide the raw material to which the organism applies its cognitive processes-its logic, which may be taxon-specific. Stimuli may contribute to the logic of the organism's response, and may do s...
Article
Animals allocate the time spent on different behaviours according to nutritional requirements, the distribution of food and the risk of predation. When the perceived predation risk is high, animals primarily behave in ways to increase their safety such as regularly scanning their surroundings, forming large groups and feeding in habitats with cover...
Article
Recent research has suggested that pigeons may have difficulty globally integrating visual information in hierarchically arranged stimuli. To isolate and understand the mechanisms responsible for processing emergent perceptual structure, three pigeons were tested in a two alternative choice task that required the global integration of organized loc...
Article
Full-text available
When humans process visual stimuli, global information often takes precedence over local information. In contrast, some recent studies have pointed to a local precedence effect in both pigeons and nonhuman primates. In the experiment reported here, we compared the speed of acquisition of two different categorizations of the same four geometric figu...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments examined pigeons' discrimination of directional movement using pictorial images shown on computer monitors. Stimuli consisted of the movement of a bird against a stationary background or the movement of the background behind a stationary bird. In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained to discriminate either leftward or rightward motion...
Article
Full-text available
Twelve pigeons ( Columba livia) were trained on a go/no-go schedule to discriminate between two kinds of movement patterns of dots, which to human observers appear to be "intentional" and "non-intentional" movements. In experiment 1, the intentional motion stimulus contained one dot (a "wolf") that moved systematically towards another dot as though...
Article
In the present study, we used a dry maze task to assess the spatial learning ability of C57BL/6N and BALB/cA mice besides the water maze task. In Experiment 1, the performance of C57BL/6N and BALB/cA mice in the water maze task and dry maze task were investigated. In the former task, the mice had to learn the position of a hidden platform submerged...

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