Kaylee Brooks

Kaylee Brooks
University of Ottawa · School of Rehabilitation Sciences

Ph.D. Candidate in Rehabilitation Sciences

About

9
Publications
926
Reads
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44
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - August 2017
University of Ottawa
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Research Assistant in the MFM Lab at uOttawa and TA for several courses in the Human Kinetics Department
January 2014 - April 2015
Queen's University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Research Assistant in the Pelvic Floor Research Lab under Dr. Linda McLean.
January 2014 - April 2015
Queen's University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2017 - August 2021
University of Ottawa
Field of study
  • Rehabilitation Science
September 2015 - August 2017
University of Ottawa
Field of study
  • Human Kinetics
September 2011 - April 2015
Queen's University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Introduction and hypothesisThe objectives were to determine whether levator ani muscle (LAM) motor function is associated with female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) severity, and whether changes in LAM motor function induced through pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) are associated with improvements in SUI signs and symptoms.Methods Pelvic morp...
Conference Paper
Background: The role of levator ani muscle (LAM) dysfunction in female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is not known. Purpose: To determine whether LAM function is associated with SUI severity, and whether changes in LAM function induced through pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) are associated with improvements in SUI in females. Methods: Female...
Article
Introduction and hypothesis: This single-blind, randomised controlled trial was aimed at determining whether peri-operative physiotherapist-supervised pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training was superior to standard care (handout) in terms of improvements in stress urinary incontinence (SUI) symptoms, cure rate, and/or post-operative filling or voiding...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction and hypothesis The aim of this study was to prospectively identify aspects of baseline demographic, clinical, and pelvic morphology of women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) that are predictive of cure with physiotherapist-supervised pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Methods Women ≥18 years old with SUI were recruited from ur...
Article
Aims Reliability and validity of force measurement and task detection by the Elvie Trainer were evaluated against an intravaginal dynamometer (IVD) and ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Women were recruited from local physiotherapy clinics. At the first visit, pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and tone were assessed manually. Women performed two s...
Article
Full-text available
Context: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is strongly recommended for the management of mild to moderate urinary incontinence (UI) in women, yet the specific elements of PFMT that lead to improvement have not been identified. This gap in knowledge may be related, at least in part, to the lack of detail provided on intervention parameters report...
Conference Paper
Objective: Using three different intervention reporting instruments : the Consensus on Exercise Reporting Template (CERT), the template for intervention description and replication (TIDieR), and the CONTENT scale for therapeutic validity of therapeutic exercise programs, the purpose of this study was to assess the completeness of exercise reporting...
Article
Introduction: Emergent evidence suggests that pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction contributes to dyspareunia, the experience of pain on vaginal penetration. Electromyography (EMG) is a valuable tool for the assessment of neuromuscular control and could be very useful in enhancing our understanding of PFM involvement in sexual function and in con...
Article
Objective: Pelvic morphology has been suggested to reflect increased tone and reduced strength of the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) in women with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) compared to healthy controls. We aimed to determine whether there are differences in pelvic morphology in the resting state, on maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), or on maxi...

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