Kay Lucek

Kay Lucek
Université de Neuchâtel | UniNE

Professor

About

54
Publications
12,571
Reads
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2,135
Citations
Citations since 2016
37 Research Items
1857 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - present
University of Basel
Position
  • Group Leader
February 2015 - July 2016
The University of Sheffield
Position
  • Fellow
October 2007 - February 2015
Eawag: Das Wasserforschungs-Institut des ETH-Bereichs
Position
  • EAWAG

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Full-text available
Changes in chromosome numbers may strongly affect reproductive barriers, because individuals heterozygous for distinct karyotypes are typically expected to be at least partially sterile or to show reduced recombination. Therefore, several classic speciation models are based on chromosomal changes. One import mechanism generating variation in chromo...
Article
Zones of secondary contact between closely related taxa are a common legacy of the Quaternary ice ages. Despite their abundance, the factors that keep species apart and prevent hybridisation are often unknown. Here we study a very narrow contact zone between three closely related butterfly species of the Erebia tyndarus species complex. Using genom...
Article
Full-text available
While linkage disequilibrium (LD) is an important parameter in genetics and evolutionary biology, the drivers of LD remain elusive. Using whole-genome sequences from across a species' range, we assessed the impact of demographic history and mating system on LD. Both range expansion and a shift from outcrossing to selfing in North American Arabidops...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Wolbachia is an endosymbiont common to most invertebrates, which can have significant evolutionary implications for its host species by acting as a barrier to gene flow. Despite the importance of Wolbachia, still little is known about its prevalence and diversification pattern among closely related host species. Wolbachia strains may ph...
Article
Chromosomal rearrangements trigger speciation by acting as barriers to gene flow. However, the underlying theory was developed with monocentric chromosomes in mind. Holocentric chromosomes, lacking a centromeric region, have repeatedly evolved and account for a significant fraction of extant biodiversity. Because chromosomal rearrangements may be m...
Article
Full-text available
We present a genome assembly from an individual male Erebia ligea (Arran brown; Arthropoda; Insecta; Lepidoptera; Nymphalidae). The genome sequence is 506 megabases in span. The majority (99.92%) of the assembly is scaffolded into 29 chromosomal pseudomolecules, with the Z sex chromosome assembled. The complete mitochondrial genome was also assembl...
Article
Full-text available
Secondary contact zones are ideal systems to study the processes that govern the evolution of reproductive barriers, especially at advanced stages of the speciation process. An increase in reproductive isolation resulting from selection against maladaptive hybrids is thought to contribute to reproductive barrier buildup in secondary contact zones....
Article
Full-text available
We present a genome assembly from an individual female Erebia aethiops (the scotch argus; Arthropoda; Insecta; Lepidoptera; Nymphalidae). The genome sequence is 473 megabases in span. The complete assembly is scaffolded into 20 chromosomal pseudomolecules, with the W and Z sex chromosomes assembled. The complete mitochondrial genome was also assemb...
Article
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The spatial scale of intraspecific genetic connectivity and population structure are important aspects of conservation genetics. However , for many species these properties are unknown. Here we used genomic data to assess the genetic structure of the small Apollo butterfly (Parnassius phoebus Fabricius, 1793; Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) across three...
Article
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eDNA metabarcoding has become a standard method for assessing wood-inhabiting fungi and bacteria, yet determination of dead-wood-inhabiting beetles still relies on time-consuming collection of beetle specimens. We thus tested whether beetle species can be identified by eDNA sequencing of wood in a mesocosm experiment that manipulated species assemb...
Article
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Aim Alpine spring ecosystems have long been considered as highly isolated, island-like habitats. This presumption, however, is insufficiently supported empirically and conclusions about spring isolation have been based on indirect evidence. Therefore, we investigated the population genomic structure of Partnunia steinmanni Walter, 1906, a strictly...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species can be powerful models for studying contemporary evolution in natural environments. As invading organisms often encounter new habitats during colonization, they will experience novel selection pressures. Threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus complex) have recently colonized large parts of Switzerland and are invasive in La...
Article
Speciation, that is, the evolution of reproductive barriers eventually leading to complete isolation, is a crucial process generating biodiversity. Recent work has contributed much to our understanding of how reproductive barriers begin to evolve, and how they are maintained in the face of gene flow. However, little is known about the transition fr...
Article
Adaptation to local climatic conditions is commonly found within species, but whether it involves the same intraspecific genomic variants is unknown. We studied this question in North American Arabidopsis lyrata, whose current distribution is shaped by post‐glacial range expansion from two refugia, resulting in two distinct genetic clusters coverin...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological speciation can sometimes rapidly generate reproductively isolated populations coexisting in sympatry, but the origin of genetic variation permitting this is rarely known. We previously explored the genomics of very recent ecological speciation into lake and stream ecotypes in stickleback from Lake Constance. Here, we reconstruct the orig...
Article
Intraspecific differentiation in response to divergent natural selection between environments is a common phenomenon in some lineages of northern freshwater fishes, especially salmonids and stickleback. Understanding why these taxa diversify and undergo adaptive radiations while most other fish species in the same environments do not, remains an op...
Article
Well prepared It is well known that species radiate into new niches by adapting to novel environments. But why do some species radiate in this way, while other, related, species do not. Ishikawa et al. looked across sticklebacks to determine why some, originally marine, lineages were able to colonize postglacial freshwater environments (see the Per...
Article
Ever-faster rates of urbanization have led to the substantial loss of agricultural land and natural areas. Furthermore, vegetated land is often fragmented and dominated by nonnative plant species within urban areas, which is likely to impact plant-pollinator interactions. However, the study of plant-pollinator interactions is labor intensive and re...
Article
Full-text available
Even though the idea that modes of speciation other than allopatric speciation are possible in nature is now widespread, compelling examples of ecological speciation in sympatry remain rare. We studied an undescribed radiation of haplochromine cichlids in a young crater lake in western Uganda, and in the small river that is nearby but has currently...
Article
The formation of ecotypes has been invoked as an important driver of postglacial biodiversity, because many species colonized heterogeneous habitats and experienced divergent selection. Ecotype formation has been predominantly studied in outcrossing taxa, while far less attention has been paid to the implications of mating system shifts. Here we ad...
Article
Theory predicts that structural genomic variants such as inversions can promote adaptive diversification and speciation. Despite increasing empirical evidence that adaptive divergence can be triggered by one or a few large inversions, the degree to which widespread genomic regions under divergent selection are associated with structural variants re...
Article
Ecological speciation and adaptive radiation are key processes shaping northern temperate freshwater fish diversity. Both often involve parapatric differentiation between stream and lake populations and less often, sympatric intralacustrine diversification into habitat‐ and resource‐associated ecotypes. However, few taxa have been studied, calling...
Article
Full-text available
For many species, the Mediterranean region harbors distinct lineages that are of conservation concerns. However, many of these are threatened by habitat degradation and by the introduction of non-native species. Here, we assess the status of the native threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in the Lake Bracciano region in Italy, where stic...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of intrinsic barriers to gene flow is a crucial step in the process of speciation. Chromosomal changes caused by fusion and fission events are one such barrier and are common in several groups of Lepidoptera. However, it remains unclear if and how chromosomal changes have contributed to speciation in this group. I tested for a phyloge...
Article
How polymorphisms are maintained within populations over long periods of time remains debated, because genetic drift and various forms of selection are expected to reduce variation. Here, we study the genetic architecture and maintenance of phenotypic morphs that confer crypsis in Timema cristinae stick insects, combining phenotypic information and...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative genetics theory predicts adaptive evolution to be constrained along evolutionary lines of least resistance. In theory, hybridization and subsequent interspecific gene flow may, however, rapidly change the evolutionary constraints of a population and eventually change its evolutionary potential, but empirical evidence is still scarce. U...
Article
Speciation can involve a transition from a few genetic loci that are resistant to gene flow to genome-wide differentiation. However, only limited data exist concerning this transition and the factors promoting it. Here, we study phases of speciation using data from >100 populations of 11 species of Timema stick insects. Consistent with early phases...
Article
Full-text available
Whitefish (Coregonus spp.) are an important catch for many freshwater fisheries, particularly in Switzerland. In support of this, supplemental stocking of whitefish species is carried out, despite lacking complete knowledge of the extent, distribution and origin of whitefish diversity in these lakes, potentially threatening local endemics via artif...
Article
Full-text available
Cryptic invasions are commonly associated with genetic changes of the native species or genetic lineage that the invaders replace. Phenotypic shifts resulting from cryptic invasions are less commonly reported given the relative paucity of historical specimens that document such phenotypic changes. Here, I study such a case in two populations of thr...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological speciation is the evolution of reproductive isolation as a consequence of direct divergent natural selection or ecologically mediated divergent sexual selection. While the genomic signature of the former has been extensively studied in recent years, only few examples exist for genomic differentiation where environment-dependent sexual se...
Article
Full-text available
Cases of evolutionary diversification can be characterized along a continuum from weak to strong genetic and phenotypic differentiation. Several factors may facilitate or constrain the differentiation process. Comparative analyses of replicates of the same taxon at different stages of differentiation can be useful to identify these factors. We esti...
Article
Full-text available
Background: A small pond near Bern, Switzerland that is about 90 years old contains a population of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) with two distinct male phenotypes. Males of one type are large and red, and nest in the shallow littoral zone. Males of the other type are small and orange, and nest offshore at slightly greater depth....
Article
Full-text available
Ecological speciation is the process by which reproductively isolated populations emerge as a consequence of divergent natural or ecologically-mediated sexual selection. Most genomic studies of ecological speciation have investigated allopatric populations, making it difficult to infer reproductive isolation. The few studies on sympatric ecotypes h...
Article
Gene flow is usually thought to reduce genetic divergence and impede local adaptation by homogenising gene pools between populations. However, evidence for local adaptation and phenotypic differentiation in highly mobile species, experiencing high levels of gene flow, is emerging. Assessing population genetic structure at different spatial scales i...
Article
Understanding the genetic background of invading species can be crucial information clarifying why they become invasive. Intraspecific genetic admixture among lineages separated in the native ranges may promote the rate and extent of an invasion by substantially increasing standing genetic variation. Here we examine the genetic relationships among...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial heterogeneity in diversity and intensity of parasitism is a typical feature of most host-parasite interactions, but understanding of the evolutionary implications of such variation is limited. One possible outcome of infection heterogeneities is parasite-mediated divergent selection between host populations, ecotypes or species which may fa...
Article
Full-text available
Neutral and adaptive variation among populations within a species is a major component of biological diversity and may be pronounced among insular populations due to geographical isolation and island specific evolutionary forces at work. Detecting and preserving potential evolutionary significant units below the species rank has become a crucial ta...
Article
Although rapid phenotypic evolution during range expansion associated with colonization of contrasting habitats has been documented in several taxa, the evolutionary mechanisms that underlie such phenotypic diver-gence have less often been investigated. A strong candidate for rapid ecotype formation within an invaded range is the three-spine stickl...
Article
When genetic constraints restrict phenotypic evolution, diversification can be predicted to evolve along so-called lines of least resistance. To address the importance of such constraints and their resolution, studies of parallel phenotypic divergence that differ in their age are valuable. Here, we investigate the parapatric evolution of six lake a...
Article
The occurrence of contemporary ecotype formation through adaptive divergence of populations within the range of an invasive species typically requires standing genetic variation but can be facilitated by phenotypic plasticity. The relative contributions of both of these to adaptive trait differentiation have rarely been simultaneously quantified in...
Article
Speciation is a fundamental evolutionary process, the knowledge of which is crucial for understanding the origins of biodiversity. Genomic approaches are an increasingly important aspect of this research field. We review current understanding of genome-wide effects of accumulating reproductive isolation and of genomic properties that influence the...
Article
The process of adaptive radiation involves multiple events of speciation in short succession, associated with ecological diversification. Understanding this process requires identifying the origins of heritable phenotypic variation that allows adaptive radiation to progress. Hybridization is one source of genetic and morphological variation that ma...
Article
The relative importance of ecological selection and geographical isolation in promoting and constraining genetic and phenotypic differentiation among populations is not always obvious. Interacting with divergent selection, restricted opportunity for gene flow may in some cases be as much a cause as a consequence of adaptation, with the latter being...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid phenotypic diversification during biological invasions can either arise by adaptation to alternative environments or by adaptive phenotypic plasticity. Where experimental evidence for adaptive plasticity is common, support for evolutionary diversification is rare. Here, we performed a controlled laboratory experiment using full-sib crosses be...
Data
Full-text available
The repeated colonization of freshwater habitats by the ancestrally marine threespined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus has been associated with many instances of parallel reduction in armour traits, most notably number of lateral plates. The change in predation regime from marine systems, dominated by gape-limited predators such as piscivorous f...
Article
Full-text available
The Cape Verdean islands form a distinct aquatic freshwater ecoregion characterized mainly by temporal water bodies with an adapted invertebrate community. Freshwater fish were not previously recorded from the archipelago. During a non-exhaustive survey of freshwater bodies on five islands of the archipelago, the first presence of a freshwater fish...
Article
Full-text available
Divergent lateral plate phenotypes in stickleback represent one of only a few cases known, where a single gene underlies the phenotype under divergent selection between different habitats. However, the selection pressures leading to the repeated loss of lateral plates in freshwater are still not well understood. By genotyping 838 individuals from 9...
Article
The Cape Verdean islands form a distinct aquatic freshwater ecoregion characterized mainly by temporal water bodies with an adapted invertebrate community. Freshwater fish were not previously recorded from the archipelago. During a non-exhaustive survey of freshwater bodies on five islands of the archipelago, the first presence of a freshwater fish...
Data
Full-text available
Background: Different predation regimes may exert divergent selection pressure on phenotypes and their associated genotypes. Threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus have a suite of bony structures, which have been shown to be an effective defence against predation and have a well-known genetic basis. Question: Do different predator regimes in...
Article
The three-spined stickleback is a widespread Holarctic species complex that radiated from the sea into freshwaters after the retreat of the Pleistocene ice sheets. In Switzerland, sticklebacks were absent with the exception of the far northwest, but different introduced populations have expanded to occupy a wide range of habitats since the late 19t...
Chapter
Full-text available
The purpose of this chapter is to demonstrate the application of geometric morphometrics in a typical study, and put the information it provides into a broader context. Here we use geometric morphometrics to describe the head shape among three different Swiss stickleback populations from two drainages, including both lake and stream residents. Head...

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