Katlin Bowman

Katlin Bowman
University of California, Santa Cruz | UCSC · Department of Ocean Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

25
Publications
8,557
Reads
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1,397
Citations
Introduction
Mercury biogeochemistry, oceanography, marine debris.
Additional affiliations
February 2008 - December 2014
Wright State University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
The accumulation of plastic debris that concentrates hydrophobic compounds and microbial communities creates the potential for altered aquatic biogeochemical cycles. This study investigated the role of plastic debris in the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in surface waters of the San Francisco Bay, Sacramento River, Lake Erie, and in coastal seaw...
Article
Full-text available
Much of the surface water of the ocean is supersaturated in elemental mercury (Hg0) with respect to the atmosphere, leading to sea-to-air transfer or evasion. This flux is large, and nearly balances inputs from the atmosphere, rivers and hydrothermal vents. While the photochemical production of Hg0 from ionic and methylated mercury is reasonably we...
Article
The focus of this paper is to briefly discuss the major advances in scientific thinking regarding: a) processes governing the fate and transport of mercury in the environment; b) advances in measurement methods; and c) how these advances in knowledge fit in within the context of the Minamata Convention on Mercury. Details regarding the information...
Article
Full-text available
A major surface circulation feature of the Arctic Ocean is the Transpolar Drift (TPD), a current that transports river‐influenced shelf water from the Laptev and East Siberian Seas toward the center of the basin and Fram Strait. In 2015, the international GEOTRACES program included a high‐resolution pan‐Arctic survey of carbon, nutrients, and a sui...
Article
Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous metal in the ocean that undergoes in situ chemical transformations in seawater and marine sediment. Most relevant to public health is the production of monomethyl-Hg, a neurotoxin to humans that accumulates in marine fish and mammals. Here we synthesize 30 years of Hg measurements in the ocean to discuss sources, sinks,...
Article
Humans are exposed to potentially harmful amounts of the neurotoxin monomethylmercury (MMHg) through consumption of marine fish and mammals. However, the pathways of MMHg production and bioaccumulation in the ocean remain elusive. In anaerobic environments, inorganic mercury (Hg) can be methylated to MMHg through an enzymatic pathway involving the...
Article
Mercury (Hg) in the Arctic Ocean is a concern due to unusually high concentrations of monomethylmercury (MMHg) in fish and marine animals. Increased human exposure from consumption of these animals is a significant health concern that is related to Hg contamination in nature. Most Arctic marine Hg research has investigated the amounts, distribution...
Article
Full-text available
The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2017 (IDP2017) is the second publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2016. The IDP2017 includes data from the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern and Indian oceans, with about twice the data volume of the pre...
Article
The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2017 (IDP2017) is the second publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2016. The IDP2017 includes data from the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern and Indian oceans, with about twice the data volume of the pre...
Article
Air-sea exchange is an important component of the global mercury (Hg) cycle as it mediates the rate of increase in ocean Hg, and therefore the rate of change in levels of methylmercury (MeHg), the most toxic and bioaccumulative form of Hg in seafood and the driver of human health concerns. Gas evasion of elemental Hg (Hg°) from the ocean is an impo...
Article
Full-text available
Recent models of global mercury (Hg) cycling have identified the downward flux of sinking particles in the ocean as a prominent Hg removal process from the ocean. At least one of these models estimates the amount of anthropogenic Hg in the ocean to be about 400 Mmol, with deep water formation and sinking fluxes representing the largest vectors by w...
Conference Paper
Many predatory marine mammals and seabirds in the Arctic have mercury (Hg) concentrations high enough to cause adverse effects in wildlife; however, the distribution of Hg species in the Arctic Ocean is unknown and there is uncertainty regarding the sources of Hg to the ocean basin and its internal production of bioaccumulative monomethylmercury. W...
Article
To better understand the source of elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) fish, we quantified fluxes of total Hg and MeHg from 11 rivers in the southeastern United States, including the 10 largest rivers discharging to the GOM. Filtered water and suspended particles were collected across estuarine salinity gradients in...
Article
Mercury is a toxic, bioaccumulating trace metal whose emissions to the environment have increased significantly as a result of anthropogenic activities such as mining and fossil fuel combustion. Several recent models have estimated that these emissions have increased the oceanic mercury inventory by 36-1,313 million moles since the 1500s. Such pred...
Article
Full-text available
The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the global mercury cycle, resulting in loadings to the ocean that have increased by at least a factor of three from pre-anthropogen...
Article
Humans are exposed to toxic and bioaccumulative monomethylmercury (MMHg) principally by consuming seafood. However, knowledge of the sources of MMHg to surface-dwelling marine organisms has been ham-pered by a paucity of information on its vertical distribution in the open ocean. Here, we report the first complete high-resolution profile of MMHg, f...
Article
Accurate determinations of trace levels of mercury (Hg) in water require scrupulously clean sampling equipment and storage bottles. To avoid Hg contamination during storage, it has been presumed that water samples must be stored in either glass or Teflon bottles cleaned with a rigorous method, such as submersion in hot acid. These cleaning procedur...
Article
Humans are exposed to toxic monomethylmercury (MMHg) principally by the consumption of marine fish. However, and due in part to analytical limitations, little is known about the distribution, sources, and biogeochemical cycling of MMHg in the ocean, where aqueous concentrations are in the femtomolar range and often less than current limits of detec...
Article
Nickel (Ni) is a common and potentially toxic heavy metal in many fluvial ecosystems. We examined the potentially competitive and complementary roles of suspended sediment and a dissolved organic ligand, humate, in affecting the partitioning and toxicity of Ni to a model organism, Daphnia magna, in both batch and stream-recirculating flume (SRF) te...

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Projects (2)
Project
Use of 210Po/210Pb/226Ra radioactive disequilibrium to assess biogeochemical processes (i.e., scavenging, bioaccumulation, organic matter remineralization, sorption) and particulate exports within the ocean
Project
For a full list of papers, please visit my webpage at: http://mason.mercury.uconn.edu/ or look up my Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=U6wykfoAAAAJ&hl=en Some current research focus areas include: 1) examining the effects of humans and climate change (temperature, carbon, nutrients) on methylmercury bioaccumulation in coastal waters;. Papers relevant to this focus include: Balcom et al. (2015); Gosnell et al. (2016; 2017); Chen et al. (2014; 2016); Ortiz et al. (2015); Schartup et al. (2013; 2014; 2015), Mazrui et al. (2016), Liu et al. (2016); Kwon et al. (2014) 2) the uptake, trophic transfer and bioaccumulation of mercury and methylmercury: Scahrtup et al. (2015); Ndu et al. (2012; 2015; 2016); Gosnell and Mason (2015); Gosnell et al. (2017); Baumann et al. (2017) 3) role of macro and nanoparticles in mercury transformations: Jonsson et al. (2016); Ortiz et al. (2015) 4) mercury cycling in the open ocean and air-sea exchange: Mason et al. (2017); Soerensen et al. (2010; 2012; 2013; 2014); Gichuki and Mason (2013; 2014); Mason et al. (2012) 5) Human impacts on mercury biogeochemical cycling: Sunderland et al. (2016); Kocman et al. (2017); Amos et al. (2015); Driscoll et al. (2013)