Katja Schulz

Katja Schulz
Friedrich Loeffler Institute | FLI · Institute of Epidemiology

Dr. med. vet. habil. and M.Sc. in One Health

About

42
Publications
11,202
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
735
Citations
Citations since 2017
37 Research Items
731 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Introduction
Katja Schulz currently works at the Institute of Epidemiology , Friedrich Loeffler Institute.

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Citation: Richter, M.; Schulz, K.; Elflein, T.; Achterberg, J.; Olševskis, E.; Seržants, M.; Lamberga, K.; Conraths, F.J.; Sauter-Louis, C. The First Eighteen Months of African Swine Fever in Wild Boar in Saxony, Germany and Latvia-A Comparison. Pathogens 2023, 12, 87. Abstract: African swine fever (ASF) emerged in Latvia in 2014. In 2020, the viru...
Article
Full-text available
Background: African swine fever (ASF) has been present in Lithuania since 2014. The disease afects mainly the wild boar population. Thus, hunters play a key role in the performance of disease surveillance and control measures. We used participatory methods to gain insight into the knowledge of hunters and to include their perceptions in the design...
Article
Full-text available
African swine fever (ASF) is an internationally-spreading viral pig disease that severely damages agricultural pork production and trade economy as well as social welfare in disease-affected regions. A comprehensive understanding of ASF risk factors is imperative for efficient disease control. As the absence of effective ASF vaccines limits disease...
Article
African swine fever (ASF) has been present in Estonia since 2014, and pigkeepers play a major role in controlling the spread of viral infection in domestic pigs. Participatory epidemiology may provide insight into livestock keepers’ existing attitudes and compliance with implementing control strategies. By conducting focus group discussions and usi...
Article
Full-text available
African swine fever (ASF) was first detected in Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia in 2014 and has since been circulating in the Baltic States with a similar epidemiological course characterized by persistence of the disease in the wild boar population and occasional spill-over infections in domestic pigs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate s...
Article
Full-text available
While numerous risk factors of African swine fever (ASF) transmission to domestic pigs have been described, ASF virus introduction has often not been traced back to one single defined cause. The large number of ASF outbreaks that occurred in domestic pigs in Lithuania from 2014 through to 2018 raised the question regarding whether outbreak-specific...
Chapter
Currently available frameworks for evaluation of surveillance systems in animal or human health often treat technical, process, and socioeconomic aspects separately instead of integrating them. The surveillance evaluation (EVA) Survtool, a support tool for the evaluation of animal health surveillance systems, was developed to provide guidance for i...
Chapter
Surveillance systems rely on a network of stakeholders who share information. Socioeconomics factors have an influence on their decision to share or not the information within the system. Those factors are rarely taken into consideration, especially in the evaluation of surveillance systems.Participatory approaches derived from social sciences have...
Article
Full-text available
African swine fever (ASF) emerged in Estonia in 2014. From February 2019 to August 2020, no pigs or wild boar tested positive for ASF virus (ASFV), only ASFV-specific antibodies could be detected in shot wild boar. However, ASF recently re-emerged in wild boar. We tested three hypotheses that might explain the current situation: (i) ASFV may have b...
Article
Full-text available
A detailed understanding of environmental risk factors for African swine fever (ASF) in wild boar will be not only essential for risk assessments but also for timely and spatially informed allocation of resources in order to manage wild boar-targeted ASF control measures efficiently. Here, we review currently known environmental risk factors that c...
Article
Full-text available
The introduction of genotype II African swine fever (ASF) virus, presumably from Africa into Georgia in 2007, and its continuous spread through Europe and Asia as a panzootic disease of suids, continues to have a huge socio-economic impact. ASF is characterized by hemorrhagic fever leading to a high case/fatality ratio in pigs. In Europe, wild boar...
Article
Full-text available
After the first occurrence of African swine fever (ASF) in Germany in September 2020, control measures were implemented that resembled those taken in the Czech Republic and Belgium, the only two countries that succeeded in eliminating ASF from their territory so far in the current epidemic. In the present study, the epidemiological course of ASF in...
Article
Full-text available
African swine fever (ASF) has been present in Lithuania since 2014. It is mainly the wildboar population that is affected. Currently, little is known about the epidemiological course ofASF in Lithuania. In the present study, ASF surveillance data from 2016–2021 were analyzed. Thenumbers of samples taken from hunted wild boar and wild boar found dea...
Article
Full-text available
Since the first detected African swine fever (ASF) cases in Lithuanian wild boar in 2014, the virus has occurred in many other member states of the European Union (EU), most recently in Belgium in 2018 and in Germany in 2020. Passive surveillance and various control measures are implemented as part of the strategy to stop disease spread in the wild...
Article
Full-text available
After the introduction of African swine fever (ASF) into Lithuania in 2014, continuous spread of the disease resulted in infection of the wild boar populations in most parts of Lithuania. The virus has been moving closer to other Western European countries where pig density is high. An efficient surveillance system detecting ASF cases early in dome...
Article
African swine fever (ASF) has massively spread in recent years and threatens the global pig industry. ASF has been present in Latvia since 2014. Hunters play a major role in the implementation of measures to control ASF and in passive disease surveillance. The probability to detect an ASF-positive wild boar is much higher in animals found dead than...
Article
Full-text available
African swine fever (ASF) has spread across many countries in Europe since the introduction into Georgia in 2007. We report here on the first cases of ASF in wild boar detected in Germany close to the border with Poland. In addition to the constant risk of ASF virus (ASFV) spread through human activities, movements of infected wild boar also repres...
Article
Full-text available
In the current epidemic of African swine fever (ASF) in Europe, the maintenance and spread of the disease among wild boar populations remains the most important epidemiological challenge. Affected and at-risk countries have addressed this situation using a diversity of wild boar management methods with varying levels of success. The methods applied...
Article
Full-text available
Searching for the term "African swine fever" (ASF) in the title of publications in the Web of Science, PubMed and Scopus during the period of 1955-2020 resulted in an average of 2009 detected articles [...].
Article
Full-text available
The first cases of African swine fever (ASF) were detected in the Lithuanian wild boar population in 2014. Since then, the disease spread slowly through the whole country, affecting both, wild boar and domestic pigs. In the other Baltic states, which both are also affected by ASF since 2014, the recent course of ASF prevalence suggests that the cou...
Article
African swine fever (ASF) was first identified in Estonia in 2014, initially detected in wild boar and spreading to affect almost the whole country from late 2016 onwards. Passive surveillance and the control measures applied in Estonia are the main actions in the attempt to control the wild boar population and therefore limit the spread of ASF. Im...
Article
Full-text available
Estonia has been combatting African swine fever (ASF) for six years now. Since October 2017, the disease has only been detected in the wild boar population, but trade restrictions had to remain in place due to international regulations. Yet, the epidemiological course of the disease has changed within the last few years. The prevalence of ASF virus...
Article
Full-text available
In 2014, African swine fever (ASF) emerged in Latvia for the first time. The majority of cases appeared in wild boar, but the presence of ASF in these animals constitutes a permanent threat to domestic pig holdings. Recent studies have shown an increase of serologically positive and a decrease of PCR‐positive ASF cases in wild boar, possibly indica...
Article
Full-text available
Participatory epidemiology (PE) is a method that gathers data from groups through focus group interviews and participatory visual and scoring exercises. The method is often used in poor communities in low-income countries where it is hard to obtain conventional epidemiological data. This paper draws on research on the public sphere and democratic d...
Article
Full-text available
African swine fever (ASF) in wild boar remains a threat for the global pig industry. Therefore, surveillance is of utmost importance; not only to control the disease, but also to detect new introductions as early as possible. Passive surveillance is regarded as the method of choice for an effective detection of ASF in wild boar populations. However...
Article
Full-text available
Since the introduction of African swine fever (ASF) into Georgia in 2007, the disease has been spreading in an unprecedented way. Many countries that are still free from the disease fear the emergence of ASF in their territory either in domestic pigs or in wild boar. In the past, ASF was often described as being a highly contagious disease with mor...
Article
Full-text available
African swine fever (ASF) in wild boar populations is difficult to control. In affected areas, samples from all wild boar shot and found dead are investigated. The use of laboratory tests allows estimating the duration of the infection in affected animals. The study aimed to test the hypothesis that the stage of the epidemic in different areas of E...
Article
Full-text available
A wild boar population infected with African Swine Fever (ASF) constitutes a constant threat to commercial pig farms and therefore to the economy of the affected country. Currently, ASF is still spreading in several countries and the implementation of intensive measures such as reducing wild boar population densities seems not to be able to stop th...
Article
African swine fever (ASF) was first detected in the Estonian wild boar population in September 2014, while the first domestic pig farm was affected in July 2015. In the present study, we aimed to analyse, retrospectively, the epidemiology of the disease in all 26 outbreaks in domestic pig herds that occurred in Estonia during the period 2015–2017....
Article
Full-text available
For the global pig industry, classical (CSF) and African swine fever (ASF) outbreaks are a constantly feared threat. Except for Sardinia, ASF was eradicated in Europe in the late 1990s, which led to a research focus on CSF because this disease continued to be present. However, ASF remerged in eastern Europe in 2007 and the interest in the disease,...
Article
Full-text available
African swine fever (ASF) in wild boar emerged in Estonia for the first time in September 2014. The first affected region was located in the South of Estonia close to the border with Latvia. It was considered to be epidemiologically connected to the outbreaks in the North of Latvia. About two weeks later, cases were detected in the North of Estonia...
Article
Full-text available
Surveillance of Classical Swine Fever (CSF) should not only focus on livestock, but must also include wild boar. To prevent disease transmission into commercial pig herds, it is therefore vital to have knowledge about the disease status in wild boar. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of alternative surveillance strategie...
Article
Full-text available
Background Surveillance measures can only be effective if key players in the system accept them. Acceptability, which describes the willingness of persons to contribute, is often analyzed using participatory methods. Participatory epidemiology enables the active involvement of key players in the assessment of epidemiological issues. In the present...
Article
Animal surveillance systems need regular evaluation. We developed an easily applicable simulation model of the German wild boar population to investigate two evaluation attributes: the sensitivity and timeliness (i.e. the ability to detect a disease outbreak rapidly) of a surveillance system. Classical swine fever (CSF) was used as an example for t...
Article
Classical swine fever (CSF) is one of the most important viral diseases of domestic pigs ( Sus scrofa domesticus) and wild boar ( Sus scrofa ). For at least 4 decades, several European Union member states were confronted with outbreaks among wild boar and, as it had been shown that infected wild boar populations can be a major cause of primary outb...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To enable wide-spread acceptance and adoption of risk-based surveillance approaches by stakeholders it is essential to provide those designing such systems with science-based frameworks guiding them through the systematic process of design and evaluation. The RISKSUR project has addressed this particular need through the development of integrated s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Animal health surveillance plays a key role in early detecting the introduction of diseases, facilitating their eradication and demonstrating disease freedom. Therefore, it is recognised as a global public good to support improved animal and global public health. In recent years, country-specific risks such as the risk of introduction from other co...

Network

Cited By

Projects