Katja Anttila

Katja Anttila
University of Turku | UTU · Department of Biology

PhD

About

55
Publications
8,949
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1,375
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2004 - April 2009
University of Oulu
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Full-text available
Exercise is known to improve cardiac recovery following coronary occlusion. However, whether short-term exercise can improve cardiac function and hypoxia tolerance ex vivo independent of reperfusion injury and the possible role of calcium channels in improved hypoxia tolerance remains unknown. Therefore, in the current study, heart function was mea...
Article
Full-text available
The cardiovascular performance of salmonids in aquaculture can be impaired by acute climate warming, posing risks for fish survival. Exercise training and functional feeds have been shown to be cardioprotective in mammals but their action on the fish heart and its upper thermal performance has not been studied. To investigate this, rainbow trout we...
Article
Full-text available
Ectotherms can respond to climate change via evolutionary adaptation, usually resulting in an increase of their upper thermal tolerance. But whether such adaptation influences the phenotypic plasticity of thermal tolerance when encountering further environmental stressors is not clear yet. This is crucial to understand because organisms experience...
Article
Full-text available
Heat waves constitute a challenge for aquatic ectotherms. However, the thermal tolerance of animals and their individual phenotypic plasticity to respond to heat waves may be influenced by thermal history. We tested these hypotheses by comparing the upper thermal tolerance and the individual capacities of three‐spined sticklebacks from populations...
Article
Full-text available
Domestication and selective breeding for rapid-growth have impaired the cardiorespiratory system of salmonids, which might compromise their capacity to tolerate environmental stressors, such as heat waves. Exercise training by swimming has been proposed as a potential tool to enhance growth, cardiac function and disease resilience in farmed fish an...
Article
Full-text available
Climate-induced warming and increased river inflows are forcing the Baltic Sea to radical changes in the near future; organisms living in this brackish-water ecosystem are already experiencing osmotic stress, which, together with thermal stress, may have severe consequences on the ecosystem. The aim of this work was to study the combined effect of...
Article
Full-text available
One of the physiological mechanisms that can limit a fish's ability to face hypoxia or elevated temperature, is maximal cardiac performance. Yet, few studies have measured how cardiac electrical activity and associated calcium cycling proteins change with acclimation to those environmental stressors. To examine this, we acclimated European sea bass...
Presentation
The aim of this study was to investigate whether melanoma impairs intrinsic heart function in mice and whether short-term voluntary running wheel exercise could reduce the possible negative effects. Additionally, we investigated whether changes in cell size, capillary density, calcium channel levels, metabolic enzyme activities or oxidative stress...
Article
The aim of this study was to investigate whether subcutaneous melanoma impairs intrinsic cardiac function and hypoxia tolerance in mice. Additionally it was investigated whether these changes could be prevented by voluntary running-wheel exercise. The role of different molecular pathways were also analysed. Male mice (C57Bl/6NCrl) were divided into...
Article
Full-text available
Heat waves are threatening fish around the world, leading sometimes to mass mortality events. One crucial function of fish failing in high temperatures is oxygen delivery capacity, i.e. cardiovascular function. For anadromous salmonids, increased temperature could be especially detrimental during upstream migration since they need efficiently worki...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and pollution are some of the greatest anthropogenic threats to wild animals. Transgenerational plasticity-when parental exposure to environmental stress leads to changes in offspring phenotype-has been highlighted as a potential mechanism to respond to various environmental and anthropogenic changes across taxa. Transgenerational ef...
Article
Full-text available
The prevalence of diabetic metabolic derangement (DMetD) has increased dramatically over the last decades. Although there is increasing evidence that DMetD is associated with cardiac dysfunction, the early DMetD-induced myocardial alterations remain incompletely understood. Here, we studied early DMetD-related cardiac changes in a clinically releva...
Article
Virtually all organisms respond to heat shock by transcription of genes encoding for heat shock proteins (HSPs), but the mechanisms behind post-transcriptional regulation are not known in detail. When we exposed zebrafish to 5 and 7 °C above normal rearing temperature for 30 min, hsp70 mRNA expression was 28 and 150 -fold higher than in control, re...
Article
Full-text available
The accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere and resulting ocean acidification represent a threat to marine ecosystems. While acid–base regulatory capacity is well developed in marine fish, allowing compensation of extra-cellular pH during short-term hypercapnia, the possible energetic costs of such regulation during long-term exposure remain to be es...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change and pollution are some of the greatest anthropogenic threats to wild animals. Transgenerational plasticity – when parental exposure to environmental stress leads to changes in offspring phenotype – has been recently highlighted as a potential mechanism to respond to various environmental and anthropogenic changes across taxa. Transge...
Poster
Full-text available
Climate change will increase the frequency and duration of extreme thermal events as has been seen during summer 2018 in the whole northern hemisphere. These heat waves have led to mass fish death events around the world. Moreover, the presence of a certain pollutant might further compromise the ability of ectotherms to respond to these sudden temp...
Article
The importance of interindividual variability in environmental responses has been little studied, although the available information suggests that, e.g., changes in environmental temperature may be associated with changes in variability. We studied, if exposure to water-soluble fraction (WSF) of crude oil can be associated with changes in interindi...
Conference Paper
Climate change will increase both the average temperature of environment but also the frequency and duration of extreme thermal events as has been seen during summer 2018 in the whole northern hemisphere. These heat waves have led to mass fish death events around the world. The ability of ectotherms to respond to these sudden temperature changes ca...
Article
Full-text available
The mean value of any parameter and its changes are usually discussed, when ecotoxicological studies are carried out. However, also the variation of any parameter and its changes can be important components of the responses to environmental contamination. Although the homogeneity of variances is commonly tested, testing is done for the use of corre...
Article
We show that cardiac sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca²⁺-ATPase (SERCA) activity differs considerably among sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations. Variability in SERCA activity was significantly correlated with elevation gain and temperature during migration, as well as maximum cardiac stroke volume. Furthermore, because SERCA activity was...
Article
Full-text available
The climate change -driven increase in temperature is occurring rapidly and decreasing the predictability of seasonal rhythms at high latitudes. It is therefore urgent to understand how a change in the relationship between the photoperiod and temperature can affect ectotherms in these environments. We tested whether temperature affects daily rhythm...
Chapter
This chapter reviews the influence of environmental temperature on the cardiovascular system. Specifically, we examine how the cardiovascular system responds to both acute and chronic changes in temperature, and how these responses differ across fish species. Cardiovascular responses from the whole organ down to the molecular level are considered....
Article
Full-text available
Oil spills pose a threat to aquatic organisms. However, the physiological effects of crude oil on cardiac function and on thermal tolerance of juvenile fish are still poorly understood. Consequently, in this paper, we will present results of two separate experiments where we exposed juvenile rainbow trout and European sea bass to crude oil and made...
Poster
Full-text available
Virtually all organisms respond to acutely increasing temperature (heat shock) by expression of heat shock proteins. The expression of heat shock genes in fish has usually been taken to be transcriptionally regulated, whereby hsp mRNA and protein change in concert. We have earlier found that the mRNA and protein production need not be coupled in a...
Article
Full-text available
The heat shock response (HSR) refers to the rapid production of heat shock proteins (hsps) in response to a sudden increase in temperature. Its regulation by heat shock factors is a good example of how gene expression is transcriptionally regulated by environmental stresses. In contrast, little is known about post-transcriptional regulation of the...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: We studied if available oxygen without induced mechanical stretch regulates the release of the biologically active B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) from Langendorff heart. Methods: Rat hearts were isolated and perfused with a physiological Krebs-Henseleit solution at a constant hydrostatic pressure in Langendorff setup. The basal O2 level o...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic activities are greatly altering the habitats of animals, whereby fish are already encountering several stressors simultaneously. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the capacity of fish to respond to two different environmental stressors (high temperature and overnight hypoxia) separately and together. We found that ac...
Article
Full-text available
This experiment tested the hypothesis that swimming performance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr is connected to cardiorespiratory performance and morphology, as well as maximum heart rate (f Hmax) related measures of thermal tolerance. Moreover, it was hypothesized that the cardiorespiratory differences between poor and strong swimmers will b...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The wide thermal tolerance range of a eurythermic fish (goldfish, Carassius auratus) was used to evaluate how temperature performance curves derived from maximum heart rate (fH) related to those for aerobic scope. For acclimation temperatures of 12°, 20°, and 28°C, optimum temperatures derived from aerobic scope curves (Topt) were 19.9° ±...
Article
Full-text available
With global temperatures projected to surpass the limits of thermal tolerance for many species, evaluating the heritable variation underlying thermal tolerance is critical for understanding the potential for adaptation to climate change. We examined the evolutionary potential of thermal tolerance within a population of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus...
Article
Full-text available
Increases in environmental temperature predicted to result from global warming have direct effects on performance of ectotherms. Moreover, cardiac function has been observed to limit the tolerance to high temperatures. Here we show that two wild populations of Atlantic salmon originating from northern and southern extremes of its European distribut...
Article
The main finding of this study was that measuring maximum heart rate during incremental warming was an effective tool to estimate upper thermal limits in three small cyprinid Danio species, which differed significantly. Arrhenius breakpoint temperature for maximum heart rate, purportedly an index of optimum temperature, was 21·2 ± 0·4, 20·1 ± 0·4 a...
Article
The main findings of the current study were that exposing adult sockeye salmon Onchorhynchus nerka to a warm temperature that they regularly encounter during their river migration induced a heat shock response at an mRNA level, and this response was exacerbated with forced swimming. Similar to the heat shock response, increased immune defence-relat...
Article
Anthropogenic environmental change is exposing animals to changes in a complex array of interacting stressors and is already having important effects on the distribution and abundance of species. However, despite extensive examination of the effects of stressors in isolation, knowledge of the effects of stressors in combination is limited. This lac...
Article
Full-text available
In fishes, performance failure at high temperature is thought to be due to a limitation on oxygen delivery (the theory of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance, OCLTT), which suggests that thermal tolerance and hypoxia tolerance might be functionally associated. Here we examined variation in temperature and hypoxia tolerance among 41 famili...
Article
Full-text available
Temperature tolerance and heart rates were compared among nine sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum in Artedi, 1792)) populations, whose eggs were incubated at 10, 14, and 16 °C before rearing all hatchlings at a common temperature. Critical thermal maximum (CTmax) significantly differed among populations and temperature treatments. Populati...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Temperature affects processes at all levels of biological organization, but it is unclear whether processes at different levels have similar thermal optima (T(opt)). Here, we compare the T(opt) for aerobic scope, a whole-organism measure of performance, with both the Arrhenius breakpoint temperature for maximum heart rate (HR-ABT), a measu...
Article
The mean ±s.e. optimum temperature (T(opt)) for aerobic scope in juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch was determined to be 17·0 ± 0·7° C. The repeated measures protocol took 3 weeks to complete the T(opt) determination using 12 fish tested at five temperatures separated by 2° C increments. This experiment also demonstrated that the T(opt) was...
Article
Full-text available
The swimming capacity of fish is strongly associated with muscle performance, although the prerequisites for effective movements have not been fully described at the molecular level. To compare the condition of swimming musculature of hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with that of wild fish, we analyzed the relative level of two excitat...
Article
The relative amount of muscle contraction regulating dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors in the swimming muscles of trained reared Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts was compared with those of untrained and wild smolts. After an optimized 2 week training period, i.e. swimming with a velocity of 1·5 body lengths per second for 6 h per day, the l...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the effect of exercise intensity and endurance training on plasma free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics and lipid metabolism in swimming muscles of reared sea trout. In both training groups [water current velocities 1 and 2 body lengths per second (bl s(-1))] the plasma level of FFAs decreased significantly (P < 0.001) compared to the control...
Article
The gastrointestinal tract of vertebrate species contains melatonin, which participates in several physiological functions. Some of these effects are mediated via specific membrane receptors (MT(1) and MT(2)). In the present study, the distribution of the MT(2) receptor protein in the gastrointestinal tract was localized, and changes in MT(2) recep...
Article
The swimming capacity of wild and reared fish differs. Whether the differences are associated with metabolic, contractile or structural variation in swimming musculature is unknown. In the present study, some aspects of contractile machinery in swimming muscles of wild and reared salmon are compared. Several morphological parameters and key enzyme...
Article
Full-text available
The regulation of energy metabolism is one of the major functions of steroid hormones. This study was performed to explore whether testosterone can regulate the aerobic capacity of skeletal muscles via myoglobin expression. To study this, changes in testosterone level were quantified, and the level of myoglobin protein was analyzed using Western bl...
Article
Full-text available
The swimming performance of two fish species, the brown trout and whitefish, having initially different swimming strategies, was measured after nine different training programs in order to relate the effects of exercise on Ca(2+) handling and oxidative capacity of swimming muscles. The time to 50% fatigue was measured during the training period, an...
Article
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of testosterone treatment on the expression of dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors in skeletal muscle of mouse. Furthermore, the effects of training, a method also known to elevate the plasma testosterone level, were studied and compared to the effects of pure testosterone administration. Male mic...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, the fiber type specificity of dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in different rat limb muscles was investigated. Western blot and histochemical analyses provided for the first time evidence that the expression of both receptors correlates to a specific myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. We observed a...
Article
To evaluate low-intensity exercise training induced changes in the expression of dihydropyridine (DHP) and ryanodine (Ry) receptors both mRNA and protein levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis from gastrocnemius (GAS) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles of mice subjected to a 15-week aerobic exercise program. The level of...
Article
Full-text available
The modulation of calcium channel density and oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle after different training protocols were studied in 3-year-old Atlantic salmon smolts. The effect of endurance exercise on dihydropyridine(DHP) and ryanodine (Ry) receptor densities as well as on muscle metabolism were determined by immunoblot and histochemical analy...
Article
The expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) subunits and dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) from red and white tail muscles of cultured smolts of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar was analysed from samples taken: (1) before the fish were transferred to the river and (2) after the migration distance of c. 50 km. The relative work load of migrating fish, est...

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Projects (2)
Project
The aim is to compare the possible differences in energy metabolism between the right and the left ventricle, and if diabetes and exercise training causes different kinds of responses between the ventricles.
Project
We study how temperature, oxygen availability and contaminants affect transcription and translation and their regulation. We study especially fish. The purpose is to evaluate both how plastic gene expression is and to what extent it is genetically regulated