Katie A. Brasell

Katie A. Brasell
University of Auckland · School of Environment

Master of Science

About

5
Publications
1,001
Reads
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85
Citations
Introduction
My PhD research focuses on using molecular and paleolimnology tools to study past and present ecological shifts in lake communities and is part of the Lakes380 Project (https://lakes380.com/). My research background is in Microbiology and Freshwater Ecology. I'm interested in development of environmental DNA (eDNA) for monitoring freshwater communities, understanding climate change and disturbance ecology. Specifically, changes in trophic status, and altered species interactions.
Additional affiliations
November 2016 - May 2018
Greater Wellington Regional Council
Position
  • Environmental Monitoring Officer
November 2014 - June 2016
New Zealand Department of Conservation
Position
  • Consultant
Education
January 2012 - February 2014
Victoria University of Wellington
Field of study
  • Freshwater Ecology & Biodiversity
February 2008 - December 2011
Victoria University of Wellington
Field of study
  • Ecology & Biodiversity + Environmental Science (Double Major)

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Lake sediments hold a wealth of information from past environments that is highly valuable for paleolimnological reconstructions. These studies increasingly apply modern molecular tools targeting sedimentary DNA (sedDNA). However, sediment core sampling can be logistically difficult, making immediate subsampling for sedDNA challenging. Sediment cor...
Article
Lakes and their catchments have been subjected to centuries to millennia of exploitation by humans. Efficient monitoring methods are required to promote proactive protection and management. Traditional monitoring is time consuming and expensive, which limits the number of lakes monitored. Lake surface sediments provide a temporally integrated repre...
Article
Opportunities to study community level responses to extreme natural pulse disturbances in unaltered ecosystems are rare. Lake sediment records that span thousands of years can contain well resolved sediment pulses, triggered by earthquakes. These paleo-records provide a means to study repeated pulse disturbance and processes of resistance (insensit...
Article
Full-text available
Benthic cyanobacterial blooms are increasing worldwide and can be harmful to human and animal health if they contain toxin-producing species. Microbial interactions are important in the formation of benthic biofilms and can lead to increased dominance and/or toxin production of one or few taxa. This study investigated how microbial interactions con...
Article
Global demand for freshwater has led to unprecedented levels of water abstraction from riverine systems. This has resulted in large alterations in natural river flows. The deleterious impacts of reduced flows on fish and macroinvertebrate abundances have been thoroughly investigated; in contrast, there is a limited understanding of the potential fo...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Reconstruct the environmental histories of New Zealand lakes to understand their past, present and future health. My PhD - Investigate past and present ecological shifts in lake communities.