Katie Beswick

Katie Beswick
University of Exeter | UoE · Department of Drama

About

21
Publications
2,192
Reads
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63
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
58 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
This article is a provocation, discussing the ways class measurement is complicated in efforts to understand participation and barriers to access for working class people. I explore class as a structure of feeling, emerging as a not-yet-worked through aspect of the theatre experience. I ask what would need to happen in theatre institutions if we to...
Article
This article thinks through how registers of ‘the real’ have operated in working-class representations, from social realism (in film, theatre, drama and soap opera) to reality television and appeals to ‘authenticity’ in publicity and marketing materials for cultural products purporting to represent the working class. It argues that the ubiquity of...
Article
Full-text available
This introduction proposes the potential of thinking with performance to address issues of global housing inequality. It introduces the housing crisis and offers an overview of articles in the special issue.
Book
This book explores the ways that council estates have been represented in England across a range of performance forms. Drawing on examples from mainstream, site-specific and resident-led performance works, it considers the political potential of contemporary performance practices concerned with the council estate. Depictions of the council estate a...
Article
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Article
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Alongside its core actor and stage technician training activities, the National Youth Theatre of Great Britain runs training programmes targeting specific ‘socially excluded’ groups. This article examines the 2009/10 iteration of the social inclusion actor training programme ‘Playing Up 2’ (subsequently suspended and reinstated as ‘Playing Up’), dr...
Article
Full-text available
Ten in Bed was a project led by participatory arts organisation Phakama, in partnership with Queen Mary University of London. Over an eight-week period we ran a series of intermedial arts workshops and staged a performance with under five-year-olds and their families at a community centre in Bethnal Green, London. We attempted to enhance creative a...
Article
Full-text available
This article applies Soja’s ‘trialectic’ as an analytical method with which to explore the relationship between the real, the imagined and the represented in SPID Theatre Company’s 2008 production 23176. This production took place in the community rooms of the Kensal House estate in Ladbroke Grove, London. The central feature of the set was hyper-r...
Article
Full-text available
This article brings together three short ‘provocations’ presented by Katie Beswick, Harriet Hawkins and Joseph Kohlmaier. Between them, these provocations investigate the idea of how the archive of the city has and might be ‘tapped’ through a number of performative acts from a broad range of different perspectives, including the role of ‘archival a...
Chapter
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In 2011, in the aftermath of the riots that took place in many of Britain’s major cities, cabinet member for housing Jonathan Glanz released a statement: Social housing isn’t a right, it’s a privilege and if people abuse that privilege then in common with anyone else they should face the consequences [...]. We have a responsibility to our communiti...
Article
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In 2010, as part of the National Youth Theatre's social inclusion educational outreach programme ‘Playing Up 2’, young people identified as ‘NEETS’ (Not in Education, Employment or Training) performed a new-writing play called The Block, by first time playwright Tarkan Cetinkaya. This play is set on an unnamed London council estate, and follows the...
Article
Full-text available
Arinze Kene's domestic drama, God's Property (Soho Theatre 2013), is set on a council estate in Deptford, South East London in 1982. The play focusses on the aftermath of longstanding racial tensions in the area that led to the 1981 Brixton Riots - a series of violent confrontations between the police and, primarily, members of the local African-Ca...
Article
This essay offers an introduction to the special issue ‘Reevaluating the Postcolonial City: Production, Reconstruction, Representation’. It institutes the cultural producer as its key reference point for reexamining the spatial imaginary of the postcolonial urban landscape. From internationally acclaimed artists, exhibition curators and marginalize...
Article
Full-text available
Council estates, otherwise known as British social housing estates, have been subject to media scrutiny since their inception, and widespread criticism of social housing remains a prominent feature of British Welfare State discourse. In recent media coverage, for example of the 2011 riots, these spaces remain central to discussions of class, econom...
Thesis
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This PhD investigates how the Council Estate (a colloquial term, used in the UK, for British social housing estates) might be ‘produced’ through contemporary performance practices. I define the Council Estate as an archetypal place, serving to contain and conceal structural inequalities. I use Henri Lefebvre’s (1991) model of ‘the production of spa...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores issues surrounding the representation of contested place by looking at the links between the Council Estate and social well-being in a specific project. The National Youth Theatre's The Block, was a new writing piece premiered as part of their 'Playing Up II' programme. Playing Up II attempted to offer access to higher educati...

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