Katie Adolphus

Katie Adolphus
University of Leeds · School of Psychology, Human Appetite Research Unit

RNutr, PhD, MSc, BSc

About

11
Publications
27,436
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488
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Introduction
Dr Katie Adolphus RNutr (Nutrition Scientist; Food Industry Nutritionist) Research Fellow part of the Nutrition and Behaviour (NAB) group at Human Appetite Research Unit, School of Psychology, University of Leeds

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides an outline of a new research project, funded through UKRI’s ‘Transforming UK food systems’ programme. The H3 project (Healthy soil, Healthy food, Healthy people) aims to transform the UK food system ‘from the ground up’, through an integrated programme of research at lab, farm, landscape, local, regional and national scales. Thi...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose We tested the acute effect of breakfast (ready-to-eat-cereal [RTEC] and milk) versus (vs.) no breakfast on cognitive function and subjective state in adolescents. Methods Healthy adolescents ( n = 234) aged 11–13 years were recruited to take part in this school-based, acute, randomised, controlled, parallel groups trial with two interventi...
Article
Full-text available
The influence on health of the human gut microbiota is increasingly recognised, however wheat fibre, consumed frequently in Western diets has traditionally been considered inert with regard to gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity. We undertook a systematic review (PRISMA methodology) of human intervention studies examining the effects...
Article
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Studies indicate that breakfast positively affects learning in children. The present study aimed to examine associations between habitual school-day breakfast consumption frequency and academic performance, as measured by the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE). The GCSE is a national academic qualification obtained by most British ch...
Article
Full-text available
The human microbiota is increasingly recognized as a major factor influencing health and well-being, with potential benefits as diverse as improved immunity, reduced risk of obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and improved cognition and mood. Bacteria inhabiting the gut are dependent on the provision of fermentable dietary substrates making diet a major fact...
Article
Full-text available
Breakfast is purported to confer a number of benefits on diet quality, health, appetite regulation, and cognitive performance. However, new evidence has challenged the long-held belief that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. This review aims to provide a comprehensive discussion of the key methodological challenges and considerations...
Article
Full-text available
Breakfast is thought to be beneficial for cognitive and academic performance in school children. However, breakfast is the most frequently skipped meal, especially among adolescents. The aim of the current article was to systematically review the evidence from intervention studies for the effects of breakfast on cognitive performance in children an...
Article
Full-text available
Breakfast has been shown to be beneficial for cognitive and academic performance in school children. However, there is a paucity of studies which examine the relationship between breakfast consumption and academic performance and a complete absence of studies in UK school children. The aim of this study, therefore, was to examine the association be...
Article
Full-text available
Breakfast consumption is associated with positive outcomes for diet quality, micronutrient intake, weight status and lifestyle factors. Breakfast has been suggested to positively affect learning in children in terms of behavior, cognitive, and school performance. However, these assertions are largely based on evidence which demonstrates acute effec...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) play an important role in the prevention of many health problems, including cardiovascular disease, mental health issues such as depression and neurological malformations during foetal growth. The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition recommends that adults should consume at...

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