Kathy McKay

Kathy McKay
University of Liverpool | UoL

PhD BA (Hons) LLB (Hons)

About

61
Publications
21,097
Reads
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445
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2014 - February 2016
University of New England (Australia)
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Full-text available
Background Governments and third-sector organizations (TSOs) require support to reduce suicide mortality through funding of suicide prevention services and innovative research. One way is for researchers to engage individuals and services in multisectoral collaborations, to collaboratively design, develop and test suicide prevention services and pr...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Gender Identity Development Services (GIDS) worldwide have experienced a significant increase in referrals in recent years. However, little is currently known about the experiences of the children and young people (CYP) and their families attending these services and the influences on their well-being. Most published qualitative stud...
Article
Full-text available
Preterm birth (birth <37 completed weeks’ gestation) is common, affecting 10.6% of live births globally (nearly 15 million babies per year). Having a new baby admitted to a neonatal unit often triggers stress and anxiety for parents. This paper seeks to explore experiences of preterm birth via Twitter. The intermingling of COVID-19 restrictions and...
Article
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Introduction: Parenting programmes help to alleviate conduct problems in children, but ensuring that all parents feel supported to attend, complete and learn from these programmes has proven difficult. Parents can feel overwhelmed and struggle to change their parenting. This article aims to inform the future refinement of parenting programmes by e...
Article
How parents navigate the physical, social, and emotional geographies of parenting groups, particularly when considering safe and unsafe spaces, has been little studied. This paper examines how a parent’s perception of a parenting programme as a safe or unsafe landscape influenced whether they completed the programme or dropped out. Transcripts from...
Article
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In the UK, tweets around COVID-19 and health care have primarily focused on the NHS. Recent research has identified that the psychological well-being of NHS staff has been adversely impacted as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to investigate narratives relating to the NHS and COVID-19 during the first lockdown (26 March–...
Article
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Background Parenting programmes aim to alleviate behavioural problems in children, including conduct disorder. This study was part of a multi-phase mixed-methods project seeking to extend the reach of parenting programmes for the treatment of conduct problems through developing an evidence base to inform a personalised approach. It explored the nar...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction The impact of living with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC) on psychological wellbeing is not well-known. A recent scoping review by the authors found that both depression and anxi- ety frequently featured in the accounts of those living with the illness. However, less clear were the factors that led to such psychological distress,...
Article
Full-text available
People with a lived experience of suicide are commonly included within suicide prevention research. This includes participation in conferences, policy development, research and other activities. Yet little is known about the impact on the person in the long term of regularly sharing one's experience to different audiences and, in some cases, to a s...
Article
Full-text available
Co-creation of new knowledge has the potential to speed up the discovery and application of new knowledge into practice. However, the progress of co-creation is hindered by a lack of definitional clarity and inconsistent use of terminology. The aim of this paper is to propose a new standardised definition of co-creation of new knowledge for health...
Article
Background: There is limited research investigating the risks for young friends exposed to the suicide of peers. Aims: This study aimed to better understand the impact of suicide bereavement on rural young people. Method: Participants in this a mixed-method study were 18 young people who had been exposed to a friend's suicide and who resided in rur...
Article
Full-text available
Those who attempt suicide have often been overlooked in the suicide prevention literature. Where stories of lived experience have been included, it is often from the perspectives of healthcare professionals who treat the physical and/or psychological impacts following an attempt, rather than firsthand accounts. Yet, the most intimate insights of su...
Article
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Introduction Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare and chronic disease characterised by inflammation and fibrosis of the liver’s bile ducts. There is no known cause or cure for the illness, which often progresses to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation. Symptoms of PSC can be very burdensome on those living with the illn...
Article
Suicide remains an important public health issue across the globe. Until recently the medically dominated field of suicide prevention has neglected first-hand accounts of suicidal thoughts and behaviors from those who have survived prior suicide attempts. This qualitative research provides insight into the experience of suicide attempt, highlightin...
Article
This article presents qualitative data to explore the experience of farming family members faced with accidental or suicide death and understand how this is experienced within the farming context. Individual semistructured interviews were conducted with 25 members of Australian farming families bereaved by suicide or accidental death. Qualitative d...
Preprint
UNSTRUCTURED The proliferation of mental health apps purporting to target and improve psychological wellbeing is ever-growing yet also concerning: few apps have been rigorously evaluated and the safety of most of them has not been determined. Over 10000 self-help apps exist but the majority are not used much after being downloaded. Gathering and an...
Article
Full-text available
Background The proliferation of mental health apps purporting to target and improve psychological wellbeing is ever-growing and also concerning: Few apps have been rigorously evaluated, and, indeed, the safety of the vast majority of them has not been determined. Over 10,000 self-help apps exist but most are not used much after being downloaded. Ga...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC) is a rare, chronic, and incurable liver disease characterised by the inflammation and scarring of the bile duct. The speed and aggression at which the disease can progress may vary between individuals. Both the cause and the underlying triggers for its progression and severity remain unknown. Those li...
Article
Exposure to suicide and the associated impacts for those left behind can be long lasting and traumatic. Literature has predominantly examined the experience of suicide and impact from the perspective of those closest to the deceased—with studies primarily focused on kin relationships. Appropriate and timely support delivered by skilled professional...
Article
Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic liver disease resulting from the inflammation and scarring of an individual's hepatic bile ducts. With no curative treatment available and a risk of potentially severe complications and death, it is likely that those diagnosed with the illness may experience impairments in their psychological wellbe...
Article
Full-text available
Research is essential to advancing clinical treatment, improving treatment outcomes, and evolving healthcare services (NHS England, 2014; NHS England Innovation & Research Unit, 2018). This is recognized by the UK Department of Health, most notably by means of continued multibillion investment in the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), t...
Article
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The inclusion of all students with special educational needs in mainstream classes was formally enacted by the Cook Islands Ministry of Education in the Special Needs Education Policy of 2002 and updated in 2011 to reflect support for diversity among all learners. This paper investigates the current views about inclusive education (IE) by exploring...
Article
Background: Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have a higher likelihood of exposure to identified risk factors for suicide when compared with the general community and have been recognised as being both capable of forming intent for suicide and acting on this intent. However, in spite of research outlining these concerns from the 1970s,...
Article
High quality mental health care after a suicide attempt is a key strategy for preventing subsequent suicide attempts and deaths, yet little is known about how people navigate the healthcare system following a suicide attempt. This paper focuses on the stories told by 20 people who had attempted suicide. Five themes emerged: fitting into the healthc...
Article
Full-text available
In some ways, lying occupies a morally ambiguous space. While lies told knowingly for selfish purposes are for the most part unacceptable, there are also some generally accepted degrees of lying. A 'white lie' told to protect someone from being hurt is 'good'; for example, an adult comforting a child and telling them that their recently-deceased pe...
Article
How much of the “Sylvia Plath” we know is a storied life rather than a real one? Can the two be separated? This is complex given that Plath’s final collection Ariel was published twice by husband then daughter. How do we (re)construct Plath as a real person when the narrative around her death is enveloped by presumptions and stereotypes of suicide?...
Article
While children both understand the concept of, and have died by, suicide, little research has been conducted on children's experiences of healthcare systems during and after a suicidal crisis. This article focuses on three case studies of mothers with suicidal daughters and aims to describe the health service experiences of parents whose children h...
Article
Objective The aim of the present study was to explore the use of complementary consent methodologies to support a potentially vulnerable group of people, namely those aging with intellectual disability, to provide personal input. It was premised on the view that processes to determine capacity for consent, appropriately modified to account for indi...
Article
Full-text available
Childhood has long been romanticised in both real life and within popular culture, yet the veneer of such romanticisation can be easily scratched. Myriad fictional worlds are grounded in stories of orphans and abandoned children, unloved and disconnected, scrabbling for survival, let alone love and acceptance.
Article
While research indicates that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents may be at increased risk of some sexually transmitted infections, there is limited information about factors that may place these young people at more risk of adverse sexual health than their non-Indigenous counterparts. Current research has tended to focus on surveilla...
Article
Last year marked the 40th anniversary of the film version of Joan Lindsay's book Picnic at Hanging Rock. First published in 1967, the book is an Australian-based story set in 1900, in which four students and a teacher from a private girls’ school go missing after climbing Hanging Rock. The narrative of the book plays with the danger of the Australi...
Article
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Language framed as derogatory names and symbols can have implications for people and their life experiences. Within a Saussurian-inspired frame, and looking at ideas of stigma and social inclusion, this paper examines the use of language as a weapon within a social context of (changing) intent and meaning. Three examples of language use in mainstre...
Article
Background Levels of STIs and teenage pregnancy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations are significantly higher than among non-Indigenous populations. However, recent research has shown few differences in the sexual behaviour of young Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. We conducted a systematic review to examine the multi-d...
Article
Full-text available
When a person goes missing, those left behind mourn an ambiguous loss where grief can be disenfranchised. Different to bereavement following death, hope figures into this experience as a missing person has the potential to return. This review explores hope for families of missing people. Lived experience of ambiguous loss was deconstructed to revea...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes a mixed methods study undertaken to describe the experience of suicide bereavement for young people in rural Australian communities. The study involved 18 rural young people who were aged between 14 and 21 years when they experienced the suicide death of a friend. The young people completed a standardised stigma questionnaire a...
Article
Full-text available
The field of suicide postvention remains relatively immature in terms of the current knowledge base. This manuscript examines the existing knowledge regarding suicide bereavement and describes the limitations of the suicide bereavement knowledge base using a critical review of the literature specifically relating to suicide bereavement published in...
Article
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A review of Aboriginal suicide prevention programs were conducted to highlight promising projects and strategies. A content analysis of gray literature was conducted to identify interventions reported to have an impact in reducing suicidal rates and behaviors. Most programs targeted the whole community and were delivered through workshops, cultural...
Chapter
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Through the ages, and within myriad cultural contexts, fairytales and folklore have taught children and adolescents morality and socially acceptable behaviours. In particular, fairytales and folklore propagate ideals about the ways in which female characters should best behave, and the ways in which others interact with them. On the one hand, w...
Thesis
Full-text available
When a sibling goes missing the experience of loss can be complex and unrelenting. The unresolved grief can complicate the bereavement journey. Within the limited literature examining the experience of those grieving this type of loss most focus on parents' experience of missing children. The voice of siblings has been little heard. The current stu...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Australia’s farmers constitute a heterogeneous group within the rural population. This literature review incorporates four broad areas: an understanding of farming communities, families and individuals and the contexts in which they live and work; an exploration of the challenges to morbidity and mortality that these communities face;...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Australia's farmers constitute a heterogeneous group within the rural population. This literature review incorporates four broad areas: an understanding of farming communities, families and individuals and the contexts in which they live and work; an exploration of the challenges to morbidity and mortality that these communities face...
Article
Full-text available
In the aftermath of suicide, grief becomes a multi-faceted experience. Traditionally, this grief was silenced where the shame attached to suicide invalidated a person's need for expression. Even now, it can be difficult for people to fully articulate their grief, let alone find an empathetic audience. How do we examine this grief to more clearly he...
Article
Full-text available
Aboriginal suicidal behaviours in remote Australia present as very different phenomena to suicidal behaviours in mainstream Australian society. Multiple suicide threats and behaviours often appear to express ways of executing violence or retaliation, rather than the immediate wish to die. This may be a response to the lack of choices in the face of...
Article
Full-text available
Traditionally, suicide research has focused on male mortality, with little attention paid to the female experience of suicide. This means there has been a lack of research examining how female suicide rates and behaviours have changed over time and between countries. Through an exploration of the World Health Organisation Statistical Information Sy...
Article
Full-text available
Suicide is an enormous problem in the Kimberley, a region in northern-Western Australia. An 18-year-old Indigenous male is seven-times more likely to die by suicide, compared to his non-Indigenous peers. Alive and Kicking Goals! (AKG) was a pilot program that took an innovative approach to suicide prevention peer education. Players from the Broome...

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Projects (8)
Project
The inclusion of lived experience within mental health research has been prioritized in recent years, acknowledging the importance of person- and patient-centred research, particularly when it focuses on services and intervention. However, there is sometimes a lack of clarity around how best to be guided by the voices of lived experience when developing a study, and when translating findings to practice, as well as how to ensure participation is valid, valued, and safe. This Special Issue aims to explore the processes of, and findings from collaborative mental health research, including the voices of lived experience at all stages of the research. Studies grounded by how community members, participants/patients, services, and researchers collaborate within community- and clinical-based research are encouraged, especially as they pertain to co-creation and co-development. This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to mental health research where the inclusion of lived experience has played an important and consistent role in various stages of the research. Papers examining the methodological processes of undertaking collaborative mental health research are also encouraged. https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/Lived_Experience_Mental_Health
Project
This programme of research seeks to address the lack of evidence pertaining to trajectories and outcomes for children and young people presenting to gender identity development services in the UK. It involves four interlinked studies; 1) An evidence synthesis/systematic review of longitudinal studies and measures relevant to the assessment of outcome and the predictors of outcome of gender identity in children and young people; 2) Secondary data analysis of 8 years of data in clinic databases both in the UK and the Netherlands to investigate factors influencing care pathways, costs and outcomes for CYP as well as cultural differences in the pattern and profile of referrals; 3) A two year prospective study of the entire cohort of children and adolescents up to age 13 referred to GID services to examine what factors predict or influence a) physical intervention as a treatment choice, b) continuing Gender Dysphoria, c) psychological health, physical health, wellbeing and quality of life over time; 4) A longitudinal qualitative study to explore experiences of living with questions regarding gender identity from the perspective of CYP and their parents, and their experiences of gender identity health services.