Kathryn Ibata-Arens

Kathryn Ibata-Arens
DePaul University · Political Science and Global Asian Studies

PhD

About

51
Publications
6,473
Reads
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140
Citations
Introduction
Kathryn Ibata-Arens is Vincent de Paul Professor of Political Economy at DePaul University. Ibata-Arens specializes in high technology policy, Asian business and politics, and Japanese political economy. Her current work is on biomedical (pharmaceutical, genomics, stem cell, medical device) innovation and entrepreneurship, and “networked techno-nationalism” in Asia. She served on the METI-State Department Japan-US Innovation and Entrepreneurship Council (2012-2013) and is a Board of Director for the Japan America Society, Chicago. Twitter: @Ibata-Arens k.ibata-arens@depaul.edu
Additional affiliations
April 2012 - present
Ritsumeikan University
Position
  • Visiting Research Faculty
January 2002 - present
DePaul University
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • international political economy, innovation and entrepreneurship, Asian business and politics, high technology policy, economic security, Asian Studies
January 2002 - present
DePaul University
Position
  • Managing Director
Education
September 1992 - June 2001
Northwestern University
Field of study
  • Political Economy, Comparative Politics, Political Theory

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
What jump-starts technology commercialization, venture capital investment, and new firm formation in new technology industries? What are the most effective ways to encourage start-ups and to connect fledgling firms to critical resources? National policies targeting life science (for example, biotechnology and medical devices) in Japan and the USA a...
Article
Full-text available
How are Asian countries preparing children to have skills—including creativity, innovation, and technical capability—to compete in the 21st Century global economy? Countries including China, Korea, Japan and Singapore have begun to integrate education policy and practice into a key component of national innovation strategies: human capital developm...
Article
Full-text available
What causes regions such as Kyoto (city and prefecture) to create a self-sustaining critical mass, or cluster, of new venture start-ups in emerging sectors? Can this success in ‘clustering’ entrepreneurial businesses be replicated elsewhere? What are the most effective ways to connect fledgling firms to critical resources? This article examines lif...
Article
Full-text available
Why is it that Kyoto, ancient cultural capital of Japan, a conservative and traditional place in many ways, manages to produce Japan's most innovative (and profitable) high technology entrepreneurial firms? Further, what causes regions such as Kyoto to create a self-sustaining critical mass, or cluster, of new venture start-ups in emerging sectors?...
Book
Full-text available
Despite a century of advances in modern medicine, as well as the rapid development of Covid vaccines, the global pharmaceutical industry has largely failed to bring to market drugs that actually cure disease. Why? And looking further ... How can government policies stimulate investment in the development of curative drugs? Is there an untapped pote...
Article
Full-text available
Beginning in the 1970s under Deng Xiaoping, the Chinese state began to use the Chinese diaspora for technonational strategic investments in core technologies, some of which were discussed in previous sessions of the Pacific Forum conference series, “21st Century Technologies, Geopolitics and the U.S.-Japan Alliance: Recognizing Game Changing Potent...
Article
Full-text available
Covid-19 is our wake-up call. Deadly pandemics are expected to keep growing in the future and our innovation system for life-saving drug development is ill equipped to deal with it. Here is why and how to fix it. A global pandemic of the magnitude of the corona virus – not to mention the rising specter of bacterial plague and parasitic infection –...
Poster
Full-text available
Excerpts and highlights from book on the strategic state and innovation and entrepreneurship in Asia
Article
Full-text available
Stanford University Press Blog Martin Kenney interviews Beyond Technonationalism author Kathryn Ibata-Arens / About the Blog / The SUP blog showcases new books and Press news in addition to serving as a forum for our authors—past and present—to expound on issues related to their scholarship. Views expressed by guest contributors to the blog do no...
Article
Full-text available
With the rise of prescription drugs and the Opioid Crisis in the West, how have Asian nations dealt with prescription drugs? What have they been doing or what have they not been doing in the midst of this Opioid Crisis? How have the governments in the region addressed these issues?
Book
Full-text available
The biomedical industry, which includes biopharmaceuticals, genomics and stem cell therapies, and medical devices, is among the fastest growing worldwide. While it has been an economic development target of many national governments, Asia is currently on track to reach the epicenter of this growth. What accounts for the rapid and sustained economic...
Chapter
Decades ago, led by the technonational rhetoric of self-reliance and improvement in human health, India delayed opening its market. Consequently, India spent decades on import substitution and other exclusionary policies in a classic technonational system architecture like Japan. Later, India invested in generic-drug research and development and pr...
Chapter
The book discusses the importance of global competition in biomedical and new-technology sectors to understanding international trade and investment in the twenty-first century. It argues that countries that pursue networked technonationalism (NTN) have been the most effective in improving innovation capacity and fostering frontier-industry growth....
Chapter
Features of China’s networked technonationalism (NTN) include aggressive science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education and entrepreneurship policies. Further, the biomedical industry has been identified by political and economic leaders as a “strategic emerging industry” and has become a focal point of state-led economic development....
Chapter
Singapore’s developmental model had to be based within its multiethnic Chinese, Indian, and Malay population and from its very inception was global in outlook. Its meritocratic Economic Development Board (EDB) and Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) tied inward FDI to domestic human-capital development and redistribution of interna...
Chapter
Japan’s strengths in intellectual property production have since the 1990s failed to translate into globally competitive new-product and new-business creation. Insular institutions and business practices have created “sticky” networks. These structures, while protecting weak industries from global competition, have trapped nascent entrepreneurs and...
Book
What explains the rapid and sustained economic rise of Asian countries in high-technology industries, including biomedicals? The biomedical industry, comprised mainly of biopharmaceuticals and medical devices, is among the fastest growing globally and has been an economic-development target of national governments around the world. The book present...
Chapter
This chapter develops a matrix that plots variations in open/tacit versus closed/codified system architectures supporting or limiting innovation capacity and new-business creation in targeted sectors. Aggregate global- and microlevel data are analyzed to identify concentrations of innovation and firm-level activity. Emerging hubs of knowledge and f...
Chapter
Chapter 7 summarizes the key findings of the book, reflecting on the framework of networked technonationalism and the conceptual typology of knowledge and networks. It compares variations in networked technonationalism as measured by variation in the knowledge and network architecture and governance regimes in China, India, Japan, and Singapore. Th...
Presentation
Full-text available
Scientist podcast is hosted and produced by Toshiki Nakashige which features different guests on each episode. The podcast discusses everything science-related and not science-related. This podcast explores various aspects of my personal background; in and out of academia. From my interests as a child to my experiences of being a woman getting her...
Article
Full-text available
Since 2000, Japan has undergone a revolution in new business incubation, investing in national capacity and building hundreds of incubation facilities. This paper contextualizes developments in Japan within international trends, while identifying model incubator types. A typology of incubation management styles is proposed, contextualized within pr...
Article
In Japanese society the pinnacle of economic and political power resides in Tokyo conglomerates and elite ministries: the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) and the Ministry of Finance. Until now, the story of this power arrangement has been told from the perspective of national bureaucrats and big business executives. The image pr...
Article
Theoretical Introduction to the Special Issue on the Embedded Enterprise - Volume 7 Issue 1 - Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Julian Dierkes, Dirk Zorn
Article
Full-text available
In Japanese society the pinnacle of economic and political power resides in Tokyo conglomerates and elite ministries: the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) and the Ministry of Finance. Until now, the story of this power arrangement has been told from the perspective of national bureaucrats and big business executives. The image pr...
Article
Full-text available
Enterprise & Society 7.1 (2006) 1-18 This special issue sets out to examine the historical embeddedness of economic activity in comparative perspective. Its contributors do this by showing political, social, and cultural contingencies that affect economic outcomes and by analyzing enterprise from the level of small firms to interfirm networks to la...
Article
Japan's innovators and entrepreneurs have survived recession in the 1990s to prosper in today's competitive business environment. This volume explores the struggles of entrepreneurs and civic-minded local leaders in fostering innovative activity, and identifies key business lessons for an economy in need of dynamic change. Ibata-Arens offers in-dep...
Article
Full-text available
Japan has often been described as a ‘network society’. Business networks are said to succeed as alternatives to markets and hierarchies by fostering cooperation and competition among members. Interpretations of existing business networks in Japan are biased toward the central state and big business, while failing to examine underlying power asymmet...
Article
Japan is often characterized as an economy of big corporations and conglomerates like NEC or Sony. In reality, the fabric of the Japanese economy is woven not with these large conglomerates but primarily with small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). Facing increasingly internationalized production structures, traditional relations between large c...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
What sort of international policy regime would facilitate material transfer of potential healing traditional medicines derived from biological (plant) resources while providing for fair and equitable benefit sharing with the indigenous peoples and protecting the biodiversity of the communities from which these cures are obtained? This research analyzes impacts on innovation system development and community stakeholder rights of shifts in intellectual property rights regimes (e.g. legislative and regulatory frameworks) in China, India, Japan and the world targeting biomedicine (e.g. biological materials such as microbes and herbs), particularly since the 1990s. It intends to fill conceptual and empirical gaps in existing literature in political economy, international policy analysis, and contribute to data analytics for empirically-grounded policymaking. Findings may also provide a reference for studies in global bioethics, business ethics, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and intellectual property law (reputational benefits of responsible conduct in prior informed consent and disclosure of origin in applications for intellectual property rights such as patents).