Kathryn Strong Hansen

Kathryn Strong Hansen
Chalmers University of Technology · Department of Communication and Learning in Science

Ph.D.

About

11
Publications
809
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Introduction
I am a senior lecturer in language and literature at Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden. My research ranges from pedagogical writing on the ways that the study of fiction is beneficial in the teaching of science and technology to literary analysis of young adult literature. Previously a tenured associate professor of literature in the United States, I now teach at a technical university in an effort to foster beneficial connections between the humanities and the sciences.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Greater emphasis on ethical issues is needed in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. The fiction for specific purposes (FSP) approach, using optimistic science fiction texts, offers a way to focus on ethical reflection that capitalizes on role models rather than negative examples. This article discusses the benefits o...
Chapter
In this chapter, I argue that, despite initially seeming to resist traditional ideas, Eoin Colfer's Artemis Fowl book series constructs a fantasy world that reinforces hidebound notions of gender and sexuality as well as of race, all of which these books interconnect. To do so, I first outline the conditions that raise the possibility that the Arte...
Article
While Suzanne Collins’s Hunger Games trilogy explicitly includes Greco-Roman references, this essay argues that the trilogy also implicitly invokes the myths of Artemis and of Philomela. In obliquely referencing these mythic women, The Hunger Games provides its protagonist, Katniss Everdeen, with different possible paths of femininity that she can...
Article
Full-text available
Writers of fiction capitalize upon dress’s potential as an agent of deception, using clothing as a means through which characters control their identity to perpetuate lies. Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina; or, Love in a Maze (1725) contains this type of heroine, and the novella shows dress can provide women with power that they can find in few other aren...
Article
Sir Terry Pratchett’s March 2015 death put a period on a life filled not only with the production of fantasy fiction, but also with dedication to raising awareness about dementia, an affliction from which he suffered. Pratchett’s life was manifestly one shaped by both the pleasures of fiction and ethical imperatives. Fittingly, Caroline Webb’s Fant...
Article
Austen scholars may have spent a few minutes—or hours—exploring the “What Jane Saw” website (http://www.whatjanesaw.org) over its launch weekend in May of 2013. Two hundred years after Jane Austen attended an art exhibit at the British Institution in London on May 23, 1813, an e-gallery became accessible, recreating the first retrospective of the w...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes a classroom activity that increases students’ connection to literary characters, and by extension, texts. The activity, constructed as a party attended by literary characters, tasks students with taking on the point of view of one character in an assigned novel. This can encourage a student to see the viewpoint of a character...