Kathryn M Edenborough

Kathryn M Edenborough
Monash University (Australia) · Institute of Vector-Borne Disease

PhD

About

19
Publications
2,488
Reads
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307
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2016 - May 2021
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2008 - January 2012
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Bats are well known reservoir hosts for RNA and DNA viruses. The use of captive bats in research has intensified over the past decade as researchers aim to examine the virus-reservoir host interface. In this study, we investigated the effects of captivity on the fecal bacterial microbiome of an insectivorous microbat, Mops condylurus, a species tha...
Article
Full-text available
The significance of the integral membrane protein Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) in the ebolavirus entry process has been determined using various cell lines derived from humans, non-human primates and fruit bats. Fruit bats have long been purported as the potential reservoir host for ebolaviruses, however several studies provide evidence that Mops condylu...
Article
Full-text available
Ebola virus infection of human dendritic cells (DCs) induces atypical adaptive immune responses and thereby exacerbates Ebola virus disease (EVD). Human DCs, infected with Ebola virus aberrantly express low levels of the DC activation markers CD80, CD86, and MHC class II. The T cell responses ensuing are commonly anergic rather than protective agai...
Preprint
Full-text available
Bats are well known reservoir hosts for RNA and DNA viruses. The use of captive bats in research has intensified over the past decade as researchers aim to examine the virus-reservoir host interface. In this study, we investigated the effects of captivity on the fecal bacterial microbiome of an insectivorous microbat, Mops condylurus, a bat species...
Article
Full-text available
Innate antiviral factors in saliva play a role in protection against respiratory infections. We tested the anti-influenza virus activities of saliva samples taken from human infants, 1–12 months old, with no history of prior exposure to influenza. In contrast to the inhibitory activity we observed in mouse and ferret saliva, the activity of human i...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Bat-borne virus surveillance is necessary for determining inter-species transmission risks and is important due to the wide-range of bat species which may harbour potential pathogens. This study aimed to monitor coronaviruses (CoVs) and paramyxoviruses (PMVs) in bats roosting in northwest Italian regions. Our investigation was focused...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: The continual threat to global health posed by influenza has led to increased efforts to improve the effectiveness of influenza vaccines for use in epidemics and pandemics. We show in this study that formulation of a low dose of inactivated detergent-split influenza vaccine with a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-based lipopeptide a...
Article
Importance: Risks for human H5N1 infection include direct contact with infected birds and frequenting contaminated environments. We used H5N1 ferret-infection models to show that breathing in the virus was more likely to produce clinical infection than swallowing contaminated liquid. We also showed that virus can spread from the respiratory tract...
Article
Although CD4(+) T cell help (Th) is critical for inducing optimal B cell and CD8(+) T cell responses, it remains unclear whether induction of CD4(+) Th responses postinfection are also dependent on CD4(+) T cell help. In this study, we show that activation of adoptively transferred Th cells during primary influenza A virus (IAV) infection enhances...
Article
CD40-CD154 (CD40 ligand) interactions are essential for the efficient priming of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. This is typically via CD4(+)CD154(+) T-cell-dependent 'licensing' of CD40(+) dendritic cells (DCs); however, DCs infected with influenza A virus (IAV) upregulate CD154 expression, thus enabling efficient CTL priming in the...
Article
Full-text available
Members of the pentraxin family, including PTX3 and serum amyloid P component (SAP), have been reported to play a role in innate host defence against a range of microbial pathogens, yet little is known regarding their antiviral activities. In this study, we demonstrate that human SAP binds to human influenza A virus (IAV) strains and mediates a ran...
Data
Amino acid at position 226 in the HA sequence from IAV strains of the H3 subtype (1968–1990). (DOC)
Data
IAV grown in human cells remains sensitive to neutralization by human SAP. IAV virus propagated in human airway epithelial cells is neutralized by SAP. Ud/72 grown in embryonated hens’ eggs (black squares) or in BEAS-2B cell line (white squares) were compared for sensitivity to human SAP using fluorescent focus reduction assay as described in Mater...
Data
Mannose-rich glycans on IAV are not the target for recognition of virus by SAP. (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
Influenza A virus (IAV) predisposes individuals to secondary infections with the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). Infections may manifest as pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, or otitis media (OM). It remains controversial as to whether secondary pneumococcal disease is due to the induction of an aberrant immune response or IAV-in...
Article
Full-text available
Influenza A virus transmission by direct contact is not well characterized. Here, we describe a mouse model for investigation of factors regulating contact-dependent transmission. Strains within the H3N2 but not H1N1 subtype of influenza virus were transmissible, and reverse-engineered viruses representing hybrids of these subtypes showed that the...
Article
The protective role played by the innate immune system during early stages of infection suggests that compounds which stimulate innate responses could be used as antimicrobial or antiviral agents. In this study, we demonstrate that the Toll-like receptor-2 agonist Pam2Cys, when administered intranasally, triggers a cascade of inflammatory and innat...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Elucidate immune mechanisms that allow bats to avoid immunopathogenic consequences of filovirus infection, yet allow viral replication to levels necessary for transmission and maintenance within the bat population.