Kathryn A. Burnett

Kathryn A. Burnett
University of the West of Scotland | UWS · Faculty of Business and Creative Industries

PhD
Scottish Islands, rurality, community, identity, media, representation, cultural work, creative practice, enterprise.

About

24
Publications
2,896
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
369
Citations
Citations since 2017
7 Research Items
265 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Introduction
Dr Kathryn A. Burnett, Division of Arts & Media, School of BCI: University of the West of Scotland. Co-Director Scottish Centre for Island Studies. Key research fields include Island Studies; Rural and Island Identity, Community and Culture; Scottish Media, Heritage and Cultural Practice; Cultural Work and Arts Praxis.
Additional affiliations
July 1994 - May 1998
University of Aberdeen
Position
  • Lecturer in Sociology and Culture
Description
  • Lecturer in Sociology including Identity, Lifestyle, Body; Rural Communities, Society and Culture; Scottish Identity and Culture; Sociology of Tourism, Heritage and Leisure; Research Methods; Sociology Theory. Member of Arkleston Centre for Rural Research
October 1992 - May 1994
Glasgow Caledonian University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Associate Lecturer in Media and Communication
Education
October 1986 - July 1990
University of Aberdeen
Field of study
  • Social Anthropology and Sociology (Honours)

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Assets and enterprise ambitions of rural and island communities are dependent on their context at the margins, “on the edge” where they face greater challenges. Such communities are sites imbued with narratives of place as ‘Romance’ and of people as ‘Resilience’. The sustained, resilient, and emerging enterprise and innovation activity within their...
Article
Full-text available
Scotland has been addressing the highest European concentrations of land ownership through land reform legislation, encouraging communities to buy out the lairds. Collective efforts to take ownership of the commons are explored through application of theories on governance, regional development and institutions. Experiences of Inner and Outer Hebri...
Book
Scotland’s islands are diverse, resourceful and singularly iconic in national and global imaginations of places «apart» yet readily reached. This collection of essays offers a fascinating commentary on Scotland’s island communities that celebrates their histories, cultures and economies in general terms. Recognising a complex geography of distinct...
Chapter
Burnett, K. A., Burnett, R., & Danson, M. (2021). Scotland and islandness: explorations in community, economy and culture. In K. A. Burnett, R. Burnett, & M. Danson (Eds.), Scotland and Islandness: Explorations in Community, Economy and Culture (pp. 1-27). (Studies in the History and Culture of Scotland; Vol. 13). Peter Lang. https://www.peterlang....
Chapter
Full-text available
Place apart: Scotland’s north as a cultural industry of margins. Scotland as a territory of ‘the north’ is a complex character. The nation as place, physical elements and expressive experience dances between a differential realm of otherness – the remote, the margin, the lost – and an increasingly confident claim to certainties and the necessary co...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of transformation in relation to climate and other global change is increasingly receiving attention. The concept provides important opportunities to help examine how rapid and fundamental change to address contemporary global challenges can be facilitated. This paper contributes to discussions about transformation by providing a social...
Article
Although there has been increasing interest in rural enterprises, relatively little has been written on enterprise and entrepreneurship on islands where problems tend to be different, additional and exaggerated. Economic and cultural development agencies intervene to support such remote and isolated communities but the significance of the dominant...
Article
A critical yet timely commentary is offered on the nature of sustainability narratives in reference to current small business enterprise in remote Scotland with a key focus on ‘place context’ and the complex interplay of social and material resources. A review of the academic and policy literature supports an interpretative, qualitative approach to...
Article
Recent research and active promotion suggests that islands and remote rural locations in Scotland do offer “attractive places to live and work”. The purpose of this paper is to explore the narratives of cultural workers, and to derive from this a further nuanced appreciation of what in-migrants to islands might express as meaningful in reference to...
Article
Full-text available
This paper sets out to ask how cultural workers on Scottish islands come to narrate their work and everyday life experiences. We ask this question in the context of two dominant doctrines that can influence whether or not these experiences are “good or bad.” The first doctrine describes attitudes toward creativity with reference to current discussi...
Chapter
PurposeThis chapter contributes to addressing the gap in the literature on entrepreneurs and enterprise in island and remote rural environments. ApproachThe research, policy and practice literature on island enterprises and entrepreneurs is reviewed, taking Scotland as a focus within wider international contexts. Islands – as spaces and cultural pl...
Article
Book Review for Northern Scotland: The Scots Imagination and Modern Memory. By Andrew Blaikie. Pp. ix+262. ISBN: 9780748617869 (hbk). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010. £65.00. DOI: 10.3366/nor.2013.0063 As Professor of Historical Sociology at the University of Aberdeen, Andrew Blaikie employs several theoretical and disciplinary positi...
Chapter
Burnett, R., and Burnett K.A. (2011) 'Scotland's Hebrides: song and culture, transmission and transformation'. In Island songs: a global repertoire . Baldacchino, G. (ed.). Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, p. 81-101 20 p. This chapter deals with the role and function of song in relation to individual and communal well-being in small Gaelic-speaking is...
Chapter
Full-text available
As far as Mr Weir could make out, arriving when conversation was fairly floated, somebody (probably the LORD ADVOCATE) had devised and was administering a system of indentured labour in the Hebrides. The terms of engagement, he gathered, involved a condition of repatriation. Now that is a thing no Scot who respects himself and truly loves his count...
Article
Full-text available
Attempts to diversify and regenerate the rural economy often embrace a particular representation of the local culture and society. The quality food product industry in particular has secured its status as a key player in the future of rural Scotland. Analysed here is the development of the cluster and enterprise strategies which seek to add value t...
Chapter
Our everyday view of heritage is one which is now deeply entwined with our sense of history and past as well as with our current consumerist tendencies; that is, choice and good value are key factors but so too are the desires to be entertained, to be educated and to be provided with an enhancement to one’s very sense of self. This point is importa...
Chapter
There is a sense in which the body is considered as an historical entity with an ‘age’ and a ‘past’. If it can be considered in historical terms why can it not also be reflected upon in heritage terms, as a site of interpretation and re-representation which is not necessarily ‘true’ nor ‘accurate’, but may be considered as ‘meaningful’ and/or ‘auth...
Article
Full-text available
Aspects of ‘localness’ are used to both define and promote Scotland’s rural people and places. By way of illustration, the social construction and consumption of Scotland’s highlands and islands as underpinned by a negotiated relationship between what is considered ‘local’ and ‘not local,’ is provided. One particular focus is on how incomer and loc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Through changing times and space the incomer has been recognised as different, an outsider and a threat. Recently, British academic attention has focused on the social processes of in-migration and counter-urbanisation (Gones, 1985; Jones et al., 1986; Halfacree, 1994), and the associated phenomenon of incomers and white settlers in rural Scotland....
Article
Sharon Macdonald (1997), Reimagining Culture: Histories, Identities and the Gaelic Renaissance, Oxford: Berg, pb, £14.99, ISBN 1859739857, pp.xix+297. Sharon Macdonald sets out to challenge conventional wisdom on two related counts. She presents her study as an informed stance on the analysis of identity in a 'remote' region of Europe. She argues t...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
Island Cultural Archives: knowledge transfer opportunities in the Hebrides 2007-2008 An Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Funded Project Dr Kathryn A Burnett,School of Media, Language and Music University of the West of Scotland Island Cultural Archives: Workshops Overview In response to an emerging ‘new era’ for the island communities of South Uist, Benbecula and Eriskay, this research project set out to explore, in collaboration with local cultural resource experts, as well as academics from several Scottish universities, the way in which the islands’ cultural resource is articulated and how it might be critically engaged with in a series of focused, thematic symposia style events. The principal aim was to bring academics and cultural organisations charged with local cultural resource management together to identify and build the research potential of the cultural resources of the Hebridean islands of South Uist, Benbecula and Eriskay. The workshop events, although small,[i] were developed with a view to further stimulate debate, inspire creativity, to forge identity and to sustain community. Three full days of focused delivery, discussion and reflection, all of which has been recorded on digital video, have delivered on this first principle aim, and details of this are found in the three workshop accounts. The incubation of knowledge transfer opportunities through the development of a specific research agenda in relation to archives variously held in trust for the community was a broad secondary aim of the project workshops and a number of thoughtful and relevant statements and suggestions were made to this end. Furthermore, a number of specific research developments were noted and aspects of these are currently being developed. In this respect the underlying ethos to foster an exchange of ideas, as well as targeting and acting upon emergent synergies from the workshop events, has been realised. Core to the project was the intention to examine the research potential of resources and how these might be developed in partnership. The core objectives of the project were formally stated as: (i) to identify the context and perceptions of cultural resources in the area; (ii) to critique how the new community ownership status of the islands impacts on this; (iii) to explore the idea and practice of adding value to a community’s existing resource through its claim on, and development of, cultural heritage. With these objectives in mind the idea of the ‘knowledge economy’ and the opportunities to exchange ideas and expertise within a specific localised context was engaged with and reflected upon in some detail. Knowledge Exchange Partnership It has been suggested that the cultural richness of the islands of South Uist, Benbecula and Eriskay is ‘immeasurable’. This claim follows in a long tradition of intellectuals, academics, and cultural champions who have not only recognised this worth but have sought to record and to disseminate the cultural heritage of the islands for a wider audience. The interest and support shown for this AHRC research study, by a number of highly respected academics, and the willingness of so many local cultural organisations to commit to the project is not only welcome, but more importantly is testimony itself to the special nature of the heritage concerned, and the potential for knowledge exchange in its name. A series of informal discussions were undertaken by Dr Kathryn A Burnett, Principle Investigator (PI) of the project in late 2006 with representatives of each of the organisations detailed below and some further preliminary workshop development took place in July 2007 with the PI making contact with several other potential participants. This resulted in representation from a highly appropriate range of community based and external HEI organisations. In some cases several participants from key organisations who undertook to deliver a presentation at a session, took part in one or more of the three workshops. In other cases only a single individual attended as representative of either their personal or an organisation interest. Certain participants came for more than one workshop and this was not only facilitated but positively encouraged by the PI. The cumulative effect of bridging discussion from each the three workshops to the next was therefore notable. The cultural archive, community and academic organisations who took part in the workshops are listed below, and a number of individuals are detailed in the workshop summaries that follow. Comunn Eachdraidh Uibhist A Deas, South Uist Historical Society Comunn Eachdraidh Beinn na Faoghla, Benbecula Historical Societ Comhairle nan Eilean Siar Dícuil Institute for Island Studies Museum nan Eilean South Uist and Benbecula Archives Trust Taigh Chearsabhagh Arts Centre Tobar an Dualchais UHI/ Sabhal Mór Ostaig University of Dundee University of Edinburgh University of the West of Scotland University of Stirling Stòras Uibhist I would like to take this opportunity to thank again all who took part and who supported and gave advice in relation to this AHRC funded workshop series. Each workshop report details those present at each event and further contributions from other individuals and groups. Each contribution was thoughtful, informed and tailored to the event thus stimulating the discussion and a quality of debate. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Mr Tommy MacDonald who facilitated the use of the Feis room at Kildonan Museum. I would like to thank Barbara MacDonald and her staff at the Kildonan Museum Café for her catering and her contribution to the success of each day. A special thanks also to the following, who each provided particular input to the success of the project overall: Mrs Effie MacMillan and Mr Donald MacNeil of Comunn Eachdraidh Uibhist A Deas and Kildonan Museum, (CEUD/South Uist Local History Society); Mrs. Catherine Muir of Comunn Eachdraidh Beinn na Faoghla, (the Benbecula Historical Society); Mr Ray Burnett (SUBAT/Dícuil Institute for Island Studies); Ms. Dana MacPhee, formerly of Museum nan Eilean and now based at Taigh Chearsabhagh, North Uist. I would also like to thank colleagues Mr Tony Grace, University of the West of Scotland, Lesley-Anne Niven and Louise McGrath, University of the West of Scotland, for their help, advice and support. What follows next is a detailed account of the workshop sessions including a number of photographic stills for further illustration. These reports (Workshops One, Two, and Three) are in themselves works in progress. Any errors, or misrepresentations are entirely mine and I will be very happy to rectify these accordingly. Furthermore, a number of project suggestions are being explored and the website set up and dedicated to the Island Cultural Archives project will detail these as they unfold (URL: https://islandcas.wordpress.com). Each Workshop report is also available to download from this website. Lastly, I would like to thank the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) for agreeing to fund this workshop series and for the comments made available by two anonymous reviewers which were most helpful in the formulation of initial stages of the project development. Dr Kathryn A Burnett, School of Media, Language and Music, University of the West of Scotland