Kathleen M. Munley

Kathleen M. Munley
University of Houston | U of H, UH · Department of Psychology

Ph.D. in Evolution Ecology and Behavior

About

14
Publications
2,312
Reads
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141
Citations
Introduction
I recently finished my Ph.D. in Evolution, Ecology, and Behavior at Indiana University. For my dissertation, I investigated the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying seasonal aggression in Siberian hamsters, with a particular emphasis on how seasonal shifts in melatonin signaling modulate changes in neural and adrenal androgen synthesis.
Additional affiliations
July 2022 - present
University of Houston
Position
  • Postdoc
Description
  • As a postdoctoral researcher in the Alward lab, I am studying the neuroendocrine and molecular regulation of social ascent in the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni.
August 2016 - May 2022
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • For my dissertation, I investigated the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying seasonal aggression in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).
August 2013 - August 2016
Louisiana State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • I assessed the role of GABA production in osmotic stress tolerance in killifish (Fundulus species) with differing salinity tolerances.
Education
August 2016 - May 2022
Indiana University Bloomington
Field of study
  • Evolution, Ecology, and Behavior
August 2009 - May 2013
University of Miami
Field of study
  • Environmental Physiology and Toxicology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Some seasonally-breeding animals are more aggressive during the short, "winter-like" days (SD) of the non-breeding season, despite gonadal regression and reduced circulating androgen levels. While the mechanisms underlying SD increases in aggression are not well understood, previous work from our lab suggests that pineal melatonin (MEL) and the adr...
Article
Aggression is a complex social behaviour that allows individuals to compete for access to limited resources (eg, mates, food and territories). Excessive or inappropriate aggression, however, has become problematic in modern societies, and current treatments are largely ineffective. Although previous work in mammals suggests that aggressive behaviou...
Article
Many animals exhibit pronounced changes in physiology and behavior on a seasonal basis, and these adaptations have evolved to promote survival and reproductive success. While the neuroendocrine pathways mediating seasonal reproduction are well-studied, far less is known about the mechanisms underlying seasonal changes in social behavior, particular...
Article
Many animals show pronounced changes in physiology and behavior across the annual cycle, and these adaptations enable individuals to prioritize investing in the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying reproduction and/or survival based on the time of year. While prior research has offered valuable insight into how seasonal variation in neuroendocrine...
Article
Individuals of virtually all vertebrate species are exposed to annual fluctuations in the deterioration and renewal of their environments. As such, organisms have evolved to restrict energetically expensive processes and activities to a specific time of the year. Thus, the precise timing of physiology and behavior is critical for individual reprodu...
Article
The Fundulus genus of killifish includes species that inhabit marshes along the U.S. Atlantic coast and the Gulf of Mexico, but differ in their ability to rapidly adjust to fluctuations in salinity. Previous work suggests that euryhaline killifish stimulate polyamine biosynthesis and accumulate putrescine in the gills during acute hypoosmotic chall...
Article
Full-text available
Many animal species exhibit year‐round aggression, a behavior that allows individuals to compete for limited resources in their environment (e.g., food and mates). Interestingly, this high degree of territoriality persists during the non‐breeding season, despite low levels of circulating gonadal steroids [i.e., testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2)]....
Article
Full-text available
Seasonally breeding animals undergo shifts in physiology and behavior in response to changes in photoperiod (day length). Interestingly, some species, such as Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), are more aggressive during the short-day photoperiods (SDs) of the non-breeding season, despite gonadal regression. While our previous data suggest that...
Article
Full-text available
Aggression is an essential social behavior that promotes survival and reproductive fitness across animal systems. While research on the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying this complex behavior has traditionally focused on the classic neuroendocrine model, in which circulating gonadal steroids are transported to the brain and directly mediate neur...
Chapter
Aggression is displayed by virtually all animals and mediates the acquisition of limited valuable resources. In breeding contexts, males compete for access to mates, and aggression is promoted by gonadal testosterone. Aggression also occurs in non-breeding contexts, when the gonads are regressed and testosterone is non-detectable in the blood. In s...
Article
Low tide emersion of intertidal fauna in the inside passage from Puget Sound, WA to Skagway, AK produces more extreme emersion temperatures than on the outer continental coastline because the timing of low tides increases the potential for summer high temperatures and winter low temperatures. This study documents seasonal changes in water/aerial te...
Article
Full-text available
Most marine teleosts defend blood pH during high CO2 exposure by sustaining elevated levels of HCO3- in body fluids. In contrast to the gill, where measures are taken to achieve net base retention, elevated CO2 leads to base loss in the intestine of marine teleosts studied to date. This loss is thought to occur through transport pathways previously...

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