Kathinka Fossum Evertsen

Kathinka Fossum Evertsen
Institutt for samfunnsforskning, Oslo

PhD

About

6
Publications
1,791
Reads
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29
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
28 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202302468101214
201720182019202020212022202302468101214
201720182019202020212022202302468101214
Introduction
Sociologist with an interest in the politics and intersections of climate aid, human mobility and gender.

Publications

Publications (6)
Preprint
Full-text available
Bistand til kvinner som er utsatte for klimaendringer bør ikke bygge på en forventing om hvor gode de er på å tilpasse seg.
Article
Full-text available
Bangladesh is transitioning into a middle-income country but remains at risk from the negative impacts of climate change. Consequently, development efforts are gradually being replaced by climate change adaptation. In this article, I investigate how ‘gender’ is understood and conceptualized in climate change adaptation in Bangladesh, and what this...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, I ask how my challenges in the field can shed light on dynamics that contribute to excluding women as research participants in (climate) migration studies, and investigate the relationship between the absence of women as migrants in literature and challenges of accessing women in the field. Multiple studies have established that wo...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This year marks 50 years since Bangladesh’s independence, at which time the country was described as a developmental “basket case”. Independence was achieved after a devastating cyclone and a bloody independence war and was soon followed by a country-wide famine. Then, when the country started hitting one development target after the other and even...
Article
Full-text available
This article addresses how gender norms impact the process of migration, and what this means for the use of migration as an adaptation strategy to cope with environmental stressors. Data was collected through qualitative fieldwork, taking the form of semi-structured and open-ended interviews and focus group discussions from a Dhaka slum and three v...
Thesis
In view of rising climate change, migration is increasingly perceived as a potential adaptation strategy to more intense and frequent environmental stressors. When investigating situations of environmental stress, gender analyzes tend to focus on how women are more vulnerable than men, and are inclined to portray women as victimized and passive, tr...

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