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Katherine Yelick

Katherine Yelick
University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory · Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

B.S., M.S., PhD

About

321
Publications
55,109
Reads
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13,938
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2010 - present
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Position
  • Associate Laboratory Director for Computing Sciences
October 2008 - October 2012
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Position
  • NERSC Division Director
January 1991 - present
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • Professor
Education
September 1982 - January 1991
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Field of study
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
September 1978 - May 1985
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Field of study
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Publications

Publications (321)
Article
Full-text available
Evaluating metagenomic software is key for optimizing metagenome interpretation and focus of the Initiative for the Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI). The CAMI II challenge engaged the community to assess methods on realistic and complex datasets with long- and short-read sequences, created computationally from around 1,700 ne...
Preprint
Full-text available
We present Atos, a task-parallel GPU dynamic scheduling framework that is especially suited to dynamic irregular applications. Compared to the dominant Bulk Synchronous Parallel (BSP) frameworks, Atos exposes additional concurrency by supporting task-parallel formulations of applications with relaxed dependencies, achieving higher GPU utilization,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Evaluating metagenomic software is key for optimizing metagenome interpretation and focus of the community-driven initiative for the Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI). In its second challenge, CAMI engaged the community to assess their methods on realistic and complex metagenomic datasets with long and short reads, created fro...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Can cloud computing infrastructures provide HPC-competitive performance for scientific applications broadly? Despite prolific related literature, this question remains open. Answers are crucial for designing future systems and democratizing high-performance computing. We present a multi-level approach to investigate the performance gap between HPC...
Preprint
Full-text available
Large scale modeling and simulation problems, from nanoscale materials to universe-scale cosmology, have in the past used the massive computing resources of High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems. Over the last decade, cloud computing has gained popularity for business applications and increasingly for computationally intensive machine learning p...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding protein structure-function relationships is a key challenge in computational biology, with applications across the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. While it is known that protein structure directly impacts protein function, many functional prediction tasks use only protein sequence. In this work, we isolate protein structu...
Preprint
Full-text available
One of the most computationally intensive tasks in computational biology is de novo genome assembly, the decoding of the sequence of an unknown genome from redundant and erroneous short sequences. A common assembly paradigm identifies overlapping sequences, simplifies their layout, and creates consensus. Despite many algorithms developed in the lit...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Bioinformatic workflows frequently make use of automated genome assembly and protein clustering tools. At the core of most of these tools, a significant portion of execution time is spent in determining optimal local alignment between two sequences. This task is performed with the Smith-Waterman algorithm, which is a dynamic programmin...
Article
Full-text available
Metagenome sequence datasets can contain terabytes of reads, too many to be coassembled together on a single shared-memory computer; consequently, they have only been assembled sample by sample (multiassembly) and combining the results is challenging. We can now perform coassembly of the largest datasets using MetaHipMer, a metagenome assembler des...
Preprint
Graph Neural Networks (GNNs) are powerful and flexible neural networks that use the naturally sparse connectivity information of the data. GNNs represent this connectivity as sparse matrices, which have lower arithmetic intensity and thus higher communication costs compared to dense matrices, making GNNs harder to scale to high concurrencies than c...
Article
Full-text available
As noted in Wikipedia, skin in the game refers to having ‘incurred risk by being involved in achieving a goal’, where ‘ skin is a synecdoche for the person involved, and game is the metaphor for actions on the field of play under discussion’. For exascale applications under development in the US Department of Energy Exascale Computing Project, noth...
Article
Full-text available
Genomic datasets are growing dramatically as the cost of sequencing continues to decline and small sequencing devices become available. Enormous community databases store and share these data with the research community, but some of these genomic data analysis problems require large-scale computational platforms to meet both the memory and computat...
Preprint
Full-text available
As third generation sequencing technologies become more reliable and widely used to solve several genome-related problems, self-correction of long reads is becoming the preferred method to reduce the error rate of Pacific Biosciences and Oxford Nanopore long reads, that is now around 10-12%. Several of these self-correction methods rely on some for...
Article
Full-text available
Pairwise sequence alignment is one of the most computationally intensive kernels in genomic data analysis, accounting for more than 90% of the runtime for key bioinformatics applications. This method is particularly expensive for third-generation sequences due to the high computational cost of analyzing sequences of length between 1Kb and 1Mb. Give...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pairwise sequence alignment is one of the most computationally intensive kernels in genomic data analysis, accounting for more than 90% of the runtime for key bioinformatics applications. This method is particularly expensive for third-generation sequences due to the high computational cost of analyzing sequences of length between 1Kb and 1Mb. Give...
Preprint
Full-text available
We present a parallel algorithm and scalable implementation for genome analysis, specifically the problem of finding overlaps and alignments for data from "third generation" long read sequencers. While long sequences of DNA offer enormous advantages for biological analysis and insight, current long read sequencing instruments have high error rates...
Preprint
Genomic data sets are growing dramatically as the cost of sequencing continues to decline and small sequencing devices become available. Enormous community databases store and share this data with the research community, but some of these genomic data analysis problems require large scale computational platforms to meet both the memory and computat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent advances in long-read sequencing enable the characterization of genome structure and its intra- and inter-species variation at a resolution that was previously impossible. Detecting overlaps between reads is integral to many long-read genomics pipelines, such as de novo genome assembly. While longer reads simplify genome assembly and improve...
Preprint
Full-text available
Distributed data structures are key to implementing scalable applications for scientific simulations and data analysis. In this paper we look at two implementation styles for distributed data structures: remote direct memory access (RDMA) and remote procedure call (RPC). We focus on operations that require individual accesses to remote portions of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
One-sided communication is a useful paradigm for irregular parallel applications, but most one-sided programming environments, including MPI's one-sided interface and PGAS programming languages, lack application-level libraries to support these applications. We present the Berkeley Container Library, a set of generic, cross-platform, high-performan...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We present a parallel algorithm and scalable implementation for genome analysis, specifically the problem of finding overlaps and alignments for data from "third generation" long read sequencers [29]. While long sequences of DNA offer enormous advantages for biological analysis and insight, current long read sequencing instruments have high error r...
Preprint
Full-text available
One-sided communication is a useful paradigm for irregular parallel applications, but most one-sided programming environments, including MPI's one-sided interface and PGAS programming languages, lack application level libraries to support these applications. We present the Berkeley Container Library, a set of generic, cross-platform, high-performan...
Preprint
Metagenome assembly is the process of transforming a set of short, overlapping, and potentially erroneous DNA segments from environmental samples into the accurate representation of the underlying microbiomes's genomes. State-of-the-art tools require big shared memory machines and cannot handle contemporary metagenome datasets that exceed Terabytes...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
De novo genome assembly is one of the most important and challenging computational problems in modern genomics; further, it shares algorithms and communication patterns important to other graph analytic and irregular applications. Unlike simulations, it has no floating point arithmetic and is dominated by small memory transactions within and betwee...
Article
Full-text available
Undirected graphical models compactly represent the structure of large, high-dimensional data sets, which are especially important in interpreting complex scientific data. Some data sets may run to multiple terabytes, and current methods are intractable in both memory size and running time. We introduce HP-CONCORD, a highly scalable optimization al...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
De novo genome assembly is one of the most important and challenging computational problems in modern genomics; further, it shares algorithms and communication patterns important to other graph analytic and irregular applications. Unlike simulations, it has no floating point arithmetic and is dominated by small memory transactions within and betwee...
Article
Full-text available
De novo whole genome assembly reconstructs genomic sequence from short, overlapping, and potentially erroneous DNA segments and is one of the most important computations in modern genomics. This work presents HipMER, a high-quality end-to-end de novo assembler designed for extreme scale analysis, via efficient parallelization of the Meraculous code...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report summarizes runtime system challenges for exascale computing, that follow from the fundamental challenges for exascale systems that have been well studied in past reports, e.g., [6, 33, 34, 32, 24]. Some of the key exascale challenges that pertain to runtime systems include parallelism, energy efficiency, memory hierarchies, data movemen...
Article
Systems of linear equations arise at the heart of many scientific and engineering applications. Many of these linear systems are sparse; i.e., most of the elements in the coefficient matrix are zero. Direct methods based on matrix factorizations are sometimes needed to ensure accurate solutions. For example, accurate solution of sparse linear syste...
Conference Paper
De novo whole genome assembly reconstructs genomic sequences from short, overlapping, and potentially erroneous DNA segments and is one of the most important computations in modern genomics. This work presents HipMer, the first high-quality end-to-end de novo assembler designed for extreme scale analysis, via efficient parallelization of the Meracu...
Article
Full-text available
H\"older-Brascamp-Lieb inequalities provide upper bounds for a class of multilinear expressions, in terms of $L^p$ norms of the functions involved. They have been extensively studied for functions defined on Euclidean spaces. Bennett-Carbery-Christ-Tao have initiated the study of these inequalities for discrete Abelian groups and, in terms of suita...
Conference Paper
Single processor clock speed scaling ended a decade ago, and transistor sizes will approach atomic scales in the next decade. With no abatement in the ideas of how to use more computing in science, engineering and business applications, and new performance drivers coming from increased density, speed and ubiquity of data collection devices, how wil...
Article
Full-text available
Polyploid species have long been thought to be recalcitrant to whole-genome assembly. By combining high-throughput sequencing, recent developments in parallel computing, and genetic mapping, we derive, de novo, a sequence assembly representing 9.1 Gbp of the highly repetitive 16 Gbp genome of hexaploid wheat, Triticum aestivum, and assign 7.1 Gb of...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional particle simulation methods are used to calculate pair wise potentials, but some problems require 3-body potentials that calculate over triplets of particles. A direct calculation of 3-body interactions involves O(n3) interactions, but has significant redundant computations that occur in a nested loop formulation. In this paper we explo...
Article
De novo whole genome assembly reconstructs genomic sequence from short, overlapping, and potentially erroneous fragments called reads. We study optimized parallelization of the most time-consuming phases of Meraculous, a state of-the-art production assembler. First, we present a new parallel algorithm for k-mer analysis, characterized by intensive...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) languages and one-sided communication enable application developers to select the communication paradigm that balances the performance needs of applications with the productivity desires of programmers. In this paper, we evaluate three different one-sided communication paradigms in the context of geometric mu...
Conference Paper
Large-scale parallel machines are programmed mainly with the single program, multiple data (SPMD) model of parallelism. While this model has advantages of scalability and simplicity, it does not fit well with divide-and-conquer parallelism or hierarchical machines that mix shared and distributed memory. In this paper, we define the recursive single...
Article
Full-text available
Today's high performance systems are typically built from shared memory nodes connected by a high speed network. That architecture, combined with the trend towards less memory per core, encourages programmers to use a mixture of message passing and multithreaded programming. Unfortunately, the advantages of using threads for in-node programming are...
Conference Paper
Multidimensional arrays are an important data structure in many scientific applications. Unfortunately, built-in support for such arrays is inadequate in C++, particularly in the distributed setting where bulk communication operations are required for good performance. In this paper, we present a multidimensional library for partitioned global addr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Cray Gemini interconnect hardware provides multiple transfer mechanisms and out-of-order message delivery to improve communication throughput. In this paper we quantify the performance of one-sided and two-sided communication paradigms with respect to: 1) the optimal available hardware transfer mechanism, 2) message ordering constraints, 3) per...
Conference Paper
Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) languages are convenient for expressing algorithms with large, random-access data, and they have proven to provide high performance and scalability through lightweight one-sided communication and locality control. While very convenient for moving data around the system, PGAS languages have taken different vie...
Article
Full-text available
The movement of data (communication) between levels of a memory hierarchy, or between parallel processors on a network, can greatly dominate the cost of computation, so algorithms that minimize communication are of interest. Motivated by this, attainable lower bounds for the amount of communication required by algorithms were established by several...
Article
Full-text available
Communication, i.e., moving data, between levels of a memory hierarchy or between parallel processors on a network, can greatly dominate the cost of computation, so algorithms that minimize communication can run much faster (and use less energy) than algorithms that do not. Motivated by this, attainable communication lower bounds were established i...