Katherine Woo

Katherine Woo
James Cook University Brisbane · College of Arts Society and Education

Doctor of Philosophy

About

11
Publications
2,761
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52
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
46 Citations
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Introduction
Katherine Woo currently works as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage. Katherine does research in Australian archaeology, zooarchaeology, and submerged palaeolandscapes.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Sampling is a practice that affects all stages of archeological research, and is a method frequently employed to manage the potentially vast quantities of material recovered from excavations. Current sampling methods used in the analyses of shell middens are largely based on those developed by the California School, and can be characterized by the...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster presented as at the Australian Academy of the Humanities 46th Annual Symposium.
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports the discovery of the estuarine bivalve species Potamocorbula faba at the archaeological site Ngarradj Warde Djobkeng in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory. Although presently widespread and abundant in southeastern Asia, this species is not known to be living anywhere in northern Australia today, and neither is it known as...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic shell accumulations (shell middens), often of great size, occur in their tens of thousands around the world’s coastlines. They mostly date from the Mid-Holocene onwards and are frequently taken as symptomatic of a Postglacial ‘revolution’ involving world-wide population growth and intensification in exploitation of marine resources. H...
Article
Full-text available
Shell middens, sometimes in the form of mounds of great size, are a ubiquitous indicator of coastal settlement and exploitation of marine resources across the world. However, shell middens are relatively rare before the mid-Holocene because most palaeoshorelines before that time are now submerged by sea-level rise since the Last Glacial Maximum (LG...
Article
Full-text available
Regional-scale assessments have proven to be invaluable frameworks for research, public engagement and management of submerged archaeological landscapes. Regional-scale approaches have been implemented internationally through a variety of academic or strategic studies. Such studies represent a much-needed next step towards subregional and site-leve...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Middens are one of the most prevalent site types in coastal environments being found across the globe. They are also vital sources of information about past human behaviour, being records of, amongst many thing, human dietary practices and environmental change. In terrestrial contexts the identification of these sites is often a relatively straight...
Conference Paper
The East Alligator River Region (EARR) has undergone considerable environmental change throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene. Rising sea-levels, and changing climatic conditions drastically altered the environments and ecosystems of this region, forcing its inhabitants to adapt their economic strategies in order to successfully exploit these new...
Conference Paper
Madjedbebe contains a rich and well-preserved Holocene faunal assemblage, which dates between 1000 and 7000ka BP. This assemblage possesses of an array of vertebrate and invertebrate species including small and large mammal species, an assortment of reptiles (snakes, lizards, and turtles), fish, and mangrove and freshwater molluscs. The richness an...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
A research project was investigating a major submerged Erteølle site called "Hjarnø Sund" from 2010 to 2017. The site itself seems to have been inhabited throughout most of the Ertebølle culture. More than 45m2 have been excavated and shell middens and refuse/outcast layers with wooden objects such as leisters, axes, bows, paddles, dugout canoes, etc. have been demonstrated. Various research projects have been linked to the site to examine the shell and gyttja layers.
Project
Underwater investigations of a submerged Ertebølle settlement. Excavations have been undertaken in 2018, 2019, 2020 and are in preparation for 2021. The site has proved to contain at least one shell midden that is dated to c.5300 cal BC. Besides that most of the site consists of marine refuse/outcast layers and excellent preservation conditions in the outcast layers have allowed the preservation of organic artefacts and faunal remains.
Archived project
Nearly one-third of Australia’s landmass was drowned after the last ice age and generations of people were displaced by sea-level change. This pioneering, multi-disciplinary study of submerged landscape archaeology in Australia is designed to investigate the records of the now-submerged Pilbara coast (spanning 50,000 to 7000 years ago). Information from drowned contexts will help address critical debates in Australian archaeology relating to past sea-level rise, population resilience, mobility, and diet. The project integrates cultural and environmental studies and contributes a unique southern hemisphere insight into world prehistory. Further, an adaptation of method from the world’s only confirmed submarine middens, in the Baltic Sea of modern Denmark, will contribute to broader questions of site submergence and preservation as well as cultural response to rising sea levels and shifting shorelines. A suite of cutting edge marine and aerial survey techniques will be developed to investigate physical and cultural submerged landscapes. Follow on www.deephistoryofseacountry.org Twitter: @DeepSeaCountry