Katherine Wander

Katherine Wander
Binghamton University | SUNY Binghamton · Department of Anthropology

MPH, PhD

About

47
Publications
9,300
Reads
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694
Citations
Citations since 2016
35 Research Items
520 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
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Disability has too often been peripheral to efforts to widen the STEMM pipeline, hampering research quality and innovation. Inspired by change in education delivery and research collaborations during the pandemic, we offer a structure for efforts to recruit and retain disabled scientists and practitioners.
Article
Cooperative networks are essential features of human society. Evolutionary theory hypothesizes that networks are used differently by men and women, yet the bulk of evidence supporting this hypothesis is based on studies conducted in a limited range of contexts and on few domains of cooperation. In this paper, we compare individual-level cooperative...
Article
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Increased access to defensible material wealth is hypothesized to escalate inequality. Market integration, which creates novel opportunities in cash economies provides a means of testing this hypothesis. Using demographic data collected from 505 households among the matrilineal and patrilineal Mosuo in 2017, we test whether MI is associated with in...
Article
Background: Milk lactoferrin is a multi-functional, iron-binding glycoprotein with immunomodulatory effects, protecting infants against infectious diseases. Aims: This study explored how maternal inflammation/infection and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) might influence human milk lactoferrin. Lactoferrin might be elevated with maternal inflammatio...
Article
Folate is an essential nutrient fundamental to human growth and development. Human milk maintains high folate content across the maternal folate status range, suggesting buffering of milk folate with prioritized delivery to milk at the expense of maternal depletion. We investigated whether and how the extent of this buffering may diminish under pro...
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Background and objectives: The human immune system has evolved to balance protection against infection with control of immune-mediated damage and tolerance of commensal microbes. Such tradeoffs between protection and harm almost certainly extend to the immune system of milk. Methodology: Among breastfeeding mother-infant dyads in Kilimanjaro, Ta...
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A lack of comparative data across laboratories is often a barrier to the uptake and adoption of new technologies. Furthermore, data generated by different immunoassay methods may be incomparable due to a lack of harmonization. In this multicenter study, we describe validation experiments conducted in a single lab and cross-lab comparisons of assay...
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The goal of assessing psychosocial stress as a process and outcome in naturalistic (i.e., field) settings is applicable across the social, biological, and health sciences. Meaningful measurement of biology-in-context is, however, far from simple or straightforward. In this brief methods review, we introduce theoretical framings, methodological conv...
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Background Among Bangladeshi men, international labor migration has increased ten-fold since 1990 and rural to urban labor migration rates have steadily increased. Labor migration of husbands has increased household wealth and redefined women’s roles, which have both positively and negatively impacted the health of wives “left behind”. We examined...
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Although cooperative social networks are considered key to human evolution, emphasis has usually been placed on the functions of men’s cooperative networks. What do women’s networks look like? Do they differ from men’s networks and what does this suggest about evolutionarily inherited gender differences in reproductive and social strategies? In thi...
Preprint
Market integration (MI) is a complex process through which individuals transition from relatively subsistence-based to market-oriented activities. Changes associated with MI alter the landscapes of individual health and reproductive decision-making. While the consequences of MI are often easily detected, the specific pathways through which MI affec...
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Malnutrition among women of reproductive age is a significant public health concern in low- and middle-income countries. Of particular concern are undernutrition from underweight and iron deficiency, along with overweight and obesity, all of which have negative health consequences for mothers and children. Accumulating evidence suggests that risk f...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although cooperative social networks are considered key to human evolution, emphasis has usually been placed on the functions of men’s cooperative networks. What do women's networks look like? Do they resemble or differ from men's and what does this suggest about evolutionarily inherited gender differences in reproductive and social strategies? In...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The immune system of milk protects against infections and guides immune system development. A system-level understanding of milk immune activity is critical for research into infant infectious disease risk and lifelong health. Research aim: To describe a protocol to characterize immune activity in human milk via in vitro stimulation...
Preprint
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Although cooperative social networks are considered key to human evolution, emphasis has most often been placed on the functions of male cooperative networks. As a result, gender differences in social networks are under-studied and remain incompletely theorized. Variation in kinship systems may be leveraged to test and generate hypotheses that expl...
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Transitions to matriliny are said to be relatively rare. This evidence is sometimes used to support arguments that perceive matriliny as a problematic and unstable system of kinship. In this article, we use an evolutionary perspective to trace changes in kinship to and from matriliny among the Mosuo of Southwest China as potentially adaptive. The M...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Among Bangladeshi men, international labor migration has increased ten-fold since 1990 and rural to urban labor migration rates have steadily increased. Labor migration of husbands has increased household wealth and redefined women’s roles, which have both positively and negatively impacted the health of wives “left behind”. We examined...
Article
Significance Greater autonomy afforded to women in matrilineal societies has been hypothesized to benefit women’s health. Among the Mosuo, a society with both matrilineal and patrilineal subpopulations, we found that gender disparities in chronic disease are not only ameliorated but reversed in matriliny compared with patriliny. Gender disparities...
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Background Female genital cutting (FGC), which poses risks to the health of girls, has proved remarkably persistent in many communities in Africa, despite decades of efforts to discourage it. The social coordination norm model of FGC attributes this persistence to high social costs for uncut women, such as exclusion from marriage markets or social...
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Background Human populations native to high altitude exhibit numerous genetic adaptations to hypobaric hypoxia. Among Tibetan plateau peoples, these include increased vasodilation and uncoupling of erythropoiesis from hypoxia. Objective/Methods We tested the hypothesis that these high‐altitude adaptations reduce risk for hypertension and diabetes‐...
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Background The maternal buffering hypothesis posits that human lactation biology can buffer milk against the mild-to-moderate malnutrition that occurred routinely in evolutionary history through the mobilization of maternal body reserves. This perspective may provide insights for understanding human milk immune content variation, such as milk sIgA,...
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Background: The maternal buffering hypothesis posits that human lactation biology can buffer milk against the mild-to-moderate malnutrition that occurred routinely in evolutionary history through the mobilization of maternal body reserves. This perspective may provide insights for understanding human milk immune content variation, such as milk sIg...
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Social norms theory has become prominent framework for understanding the perpetuation of practices such as female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C), and has influenced the design of interventions aimed at stopping the practice. Theoretical advances draw attention to the fact that practices such as FGM/C is often upheld by multiple interconnected n...
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Background Maternal anemia has adverse consequences for the mother‐infant dyad. To evaluate whether and how milk nutrient content may change in ways that could “buffer” infants against the conditions underlying maternal anemia, this study assessed associations between milk macronutrients and maternal iron‐deficiency anemia (IDA), non‐iron‐deficienc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human populations native to high altitude regions (≥2500 m) exhibit numerous adaptations to hypoxic stress. On the Tibetan Plateau, these include modifications of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway to essentially uncouple erythropoiesis (red blood cell production) and blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration - which normally increase in response...
Article
Full-text available
Social norms theory has become prominent framework for understanding the perpetuation of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C), and has influenced the design of interventions aimed at stopping the practice. Theoretical advances draw attention to the fact that FGM/C is often upheld by multiple interconnected norms that may vary and shift over ti...
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Objective: The optimal iron hypothesis posits a trade-off in iron nutrition-iron deficiency restricts iron available to infectious agents, protecting against severe infection, but also compromises immune defense-such that mild-to-moderate iron deficiency may be more adaptive than either iron-replete or severe deficiency in environments with high i...
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Objective: We posited a trade-off in iron nutrition, with iron deficiency decreasing risk for infection by depriving infectious agents of iron while increasing risk for infection by compromising immune protection. We described associations between iron deficiency and prevalent and incident infectious disease episodes and cell-mediated immunity (CMI...
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Female genital cutting in five West African nations is frequency-dependent and is associated with higher reproductive success among ethnicities in which cutting predominates, a fitness advantage that may outweigh its costs to physical and psychological health.
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Objectives: To investigate the hygiene (or "old friends") hypothesis in a high-infectious disease (ID) environment, rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Methods: Among a cross-sectional sample of 2- to 7-year-old children, we collected physician-diagnosed hay fever, asthma, and eczema, history of hospitalization, family size, and household environment i...
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Breastfeeding has been associated with numerous health and well-being benefits for both children and their mothers, including prolonging the birth interval to the subsequent sibling. The clearest associations between breastfeeding and health outcomes, per se, reflect exclusive breastfeeding in the first months of postnatal life and are most evident...
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Although the international community has recently promoted legislation as an important reform strategy for ending female genital cutting (FGC), there exist divergent views on its potential effects. Supporters argue that legal prohibition of FGC has a general deterrent effect, while others argue legislation can be perceived as coercive, and derail l...
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Public health recommendations promote prolonged breastfeeding of all children; however, parental investment (PI) theory predicts that breastfeeding will be allocated among a mothers' offspring to maximize her reproductive success. We evaluated PI in terms of risk for weaning before age two among 283 children in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Results demons...
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We evaluated sex, age, nutritional status, and infectious disease (ID) as predictors of two biomarkers of cell-mediated immunity (CMI), delayed-type hypersensitivity to Candida albicans (DTH-Candida), and anti-Epstein-Barr virus antibody (EBV Ab), among 200 children in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. DTH-Candida, which decreases with compromised CMI, was po...
Article
Biomarkers of inflammation, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and α(1) -acid glycoprotein (AGP), have tremendous potential in anthropological, public health, and nutrition research as objective indicators of acute infection; however, their usage is limited by the lack of widely agreed upon, reliable cutpoints to define infection. We assessed the s...
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Multiple lines of evidence suggest that infections in early life prevent the development of pathological immune responses to allergens and autoantigens (the hygiene hypothesis). Early infections may also affect later immune responses to pathogen antigen. To evaluate an association between early infections and immune responses to pathogen antigen, d...
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Recent reviews of intervention efforts aimed at ending female genital cutting (FGC) have concluded that progress to date has been slow, and call for more efficient programs informed by theories on behavior change. Social convention theory, first proposed by Mackie (1996), posits that in the context of extreme resource inequality, FGC emerged as a m...
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An evolutionary perspective suggests that iron deficiency may have opposing effects on infectious disease risk, decreasing susceptibility by restricting iron availability to pathogens, and increasing susceptibility by compromising cellular immunocompetence. In some environments, the trade-off between these effects may result in optimal iron intake...
Article
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An evolutionary perspective suggests that iron deficiency may have opposing effects on infectious dis-ease risk, decreasing susceptibility by restricting iron availability to pathogens, and increasing susceptibility by com-promising cellular immunocompetence. In some environments, the trade-off between these effects may result in optimal iron intak...
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C-reactive protein (CRP) is a widely used, sensitive biomarker of inflammation. Studies conducted among users of exogenous hormones suggest that estrogen increases CRP, whereas progesterone decreases CRP. Examinations of CRP in normally cycling women suggest the opposite: CRP is negatively associated with endogenous estrogen and positively associat...

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