Katherine Szabo

Katherine Szabo
Pre-Construct Archaeology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

90
Publications
26,258
Reads
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1,368
Citations
Citations since 2016
39 Research Items
912 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Additional affiliations
May 2019 - present
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Affiliate Researcher

Publications

Publications (90)
Article
Full-text available
Three freshwater mussel shell tools recovered from the Lake Mungo lunette, in semi-arid south-eastern Australia with bracketing age estimates of 40–30 ka, and a possible fourth tool with bracketing age estimates of 50–40 ka, are described. An experimental approach, combined with detailed structural and taphonomic analysis of the shell establishes t...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and sea level rise are expected to exacerbate existing coastal hazards such as erosion and inundation. As a result many coastal heritage sites around the world are expected to be put at potential risk of damage or destruction. The likely susceptibility of Australia’s Indigenous coastal heritage sites to these hazards is widely recogn...
Article
Full-text available
Shell valuable exchange in the New Guinea Highlands has been a key interest in anthropology, providing insight into economics, aesthetics, and social stratification among banded communities. This article describes how shell exchange at ethnographic present reflects deeper historical processes. We trace the origins and subsequent changes in shell us...
Article
Pleistocene tools manufactured in shell are rarely identified. This may in part be due to the complexity of shell as a raw material and associated challenges in recognising and interpreting shell modification. A series of unusually-shaped Scutellastra flexuosa limpets from c. 30,000 year old deposits in Golo Cave, eastern Indonesia were identified...
Article
Archaeomalacological analysis is generally undertaken on recovered macro-remains to characterize the overall composition of faunal remains in a deposit. Given the susceptibility of shell middens to a variety of taphonomic processes, it is assumed that the prior presence of shell in deposits may therefore occasionally be missed. Deteriorated micro-r...
Article
Full-text available
Thermal influences on marine molluscs are poorly understood across all disciplines, including archaeology. This presents potential issues for further analysis including radiocarbon dating and stable isotope analysis, as well as hindering our understandings of processing and preparation methods for shell in the past. Different methods of burning or...
Chapter
Pre-Lapita and Lapita worked shell recovered from the excavation of Tanamu 1, Caution Bay, south coast of Papua New Guinea
Book
The Archaeology of Tanamu 1 presents the results from Tanamu 1, the first site to be published in detail in the Caution Bay Studies in Archaeology series. In 2008–2010, the Caution Bay Archaeological Project excavated 122 stratified sites 20km northwest of Port Moresby, south coast of Papua New Guinea. This remains the largest archaeological salvag...
Chapter
Full-text available
[Extract] The molluscan assemblage reported here is from Tanamu 1 at Caution Bay, an archaeological site dating from c.5,000 cal BP to c. 100 cal BP. Two 1m × 1m squares (A and B) were excavated in 2.1 ± 0.5cm excavation units (XUs) to 2.82m depth, with all excavated materials retained in 2.1mm mesh sieves undergoing systematic analysis in dedicate...
Chapter
The Archaeology of Tanamu 1 presents the results from Tanamu 1, the first site to be published in detail in the Caution Bay Studies in Archaeology series. In 2008–2010, the Caution Bay Archaeological Project excavated 122 stratified sites 20km northwest of Port Moresby, south coast of Papua New Guinea. This remains the largest archaeological salvag...
Chapter
The Archaeology of Tanamu 1 presents the results from Tanamu 1, the first site to be published in detail in the Caution Bay Studies in Archaeology series. In 2008–2010, the Caution Bay Archaeological Project excavated 122 stratified sites 20km northwest of Port Moresby, south coast of Papua New Guinea. This remains the largest archaeological salvag...
Conference Paper
Archaeomalacological analysis is generally undertaken on recovered macro-remains to characterize the overall composition of faunal remains in a deposit. Given the susceptibility of shell middens to a variety of taphonomic processes, it is assumed that the prior presence of shell in deposits may therefore occasionally be missed. Deteriorated micro-r...
Article
Southeastern Australia’s temperate East Gippsland region is a large and diverse landscape that spans from the Bass Strait coast to the Australian Alps. The region includes a number of national parks and reserves jointly managed by Aboriginal Traditional Owners, the Gunaikurnai Land and Waters Aboriginal Corporation (the ‘Gunaikurnai Corporation’),...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal occupation and foraging during the last glacial maximum and early Holocene at Waterfall Bluff, eastern Pondoland, South Africa – Erratum - Erich C. Fisher, Hayley C. Cawthra, Irene Esteban, Antonieta Jerardino, Frank H. Neumann, Annette Oertle, Justin Pargeter, Rosaria B. Saktura, Katherine Szabó, Stephan Winkler, Irit Zohar
Article
Waterfall Bluff is a rock shelter in eastern Pondoland, South Africa, adjacent to a narrow continental shelf that limited coastline movements across glacial/interglacial cycles. The archaeological deposits are characterized by well-preserved stratigra-phy, faunal, and botanical remains alongside abundant stone artifacts and other materials. A compr...
Article
Currently the earliest evidence for dog dispersal into the Greater Australian region and surrounds is found in Australia (Madura Cave 3210–3361 cal BP), New Ireland (Kamgot, c. 3000–3300 cal BP) and Timor-Leste (Matja Kuru 2, 2886–3068 cal BP). Previously, the earliest published dog remains for the large continental island of New Guinea was from Ed...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Caution Bay archaeological project on the south coast of mainland Papua New Guinea has excavated 122 sites over a 9 km2 area. Lapita ceramics appear at a number of sites at c. 2900 cal. BP. Here we present the results of excavations at Moiapu 3, a site that helps define the end of the dentate-stamped Lapita phase of this region. It is suggested...
Chapter
Full-text available
The practice of shellfishing is complex in nature with a huge range of shell species and a variety of gathering practices based on habitat, location, time of day and individual human behaviours. Additionally, cooking techniques and discard patterns can also vary from one site to another. Varying processing methods and discard patterns affect the pr...
Article
Full-text available
The six-hectare site of Vaito'otia-Fa'ahia on Huahine Island in the Leeward Societies is renowned for its wealth of material culture typifying early East Polynesian settlement, including items of wood and fibre preserved by waterlogging, through the research of Yosihiko Sinoto and colleagues in particular. However, the stratigraphy for much of the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Pacific presences-volume 2: Hundreds of thousands of works of art and artefacts from many parts of the Pacific are dispersed across European museums. They range from seemingly quotidian things such as fish-hooks and baskets to great sculptures of divinities, architectural forms and canoes. These collections constitute a remarkable resource for unde...
Chapter
Traditional ‘valuables’, and in particular ‘shell valuables’, have a particular resonance within both the archaeology and anthropology of the Pacific Islands. In the case of Fiji, one of the most recognisable high-status valuables discussed in historical and art-historical texts, and taking pride of place in museum collections, is the civavonovono,...
Chapter
‘Art’, in the context of the Pacific, is a multi-stranded and complex term, replete with much scholarly literature over a variety of disciplines. Combining the term ‘portable’ with ‘art’ construes another meaning entirely; this term has almost exclusively been used in the domain of discussions of the European Palaeolithic and, as such, has its own...
Conference Paper
The P5 Project is an international and interdisciplinary team of researchers studying hunter-gatherer adaptations in persistent coastal contexts in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Since 2015, excavations at the site of Waterfall Bluff (A2SE-1) have revealed stratified and well-preserved remains of coastal hunter-gatherer occupations dati...
Article
Full-text available
While spatial turnover in species composition is well documented (Whittaker 1975; Condit et al. 2002) much less investigation has been conducted over long‐time periods. Land snails provide a unique window to observe such patterns because their fossil shells not only allow for species‐level identifications and quantification of abundance (Schilthuiz...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a reassessment of the archaeological record at Leang Burung 2, a key early human occupation site in the Late Pleistocene of Southeast Asia. Excavated originally by Ian Glover in 1975, this limestone rock-shelter in the Maros karsts of Sulawesi, Indonesia, has long held significance in our understanding of early human dispersals...
Conference Paper
Tropical archaeological shell middens throughout Australasia provide valuable information about subsistence practices, environmental changes, and human occupation. One of the major anthropic processes that can occur in any midden site is burning or heating of the shell, either from cooking or heat-treating shell for working. Thermal influences on...
Article
Shanidar Cave contains one of the most important Palaeolithic archaeological sequences in West Asia. During renewed excavations of Baradostian (Upper Palaeolithic) layers in the cave, an incised land-snail shell fragment was recovered. A natural cause seems unlikely and it does not appear likely to reflect palaeoeconomic functions. It is suggested...
Article
Full-text available
Shanidar Cave contains one of the most important Palaeolithic archaeological sequences in West Asia. During renewed excavations of Baradostian (Upper Palaeolithic) layers in the cave, an incised land-snail shell fragment was recovered. A natural cause seems unlikely and it does not appear likely to reflect palaeoeconomic functions. It is suggested...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reports on the personnel, research structure and analytical methods employed in the Caution Bay project, constituting the sum of the various phases of field and laboratory research at Caution Bay. We stress that from the onset our approach has been to investigate through excavation the character of the archaeological record at a landsc...
Chapter
Full-text available
One of the more persistent gaps in our knowledge of prehistoric human adaptation to tropical environments is the lack of developed models of early forager mobility and site function in Southeast Asia. This situation has been perpetuated, partly by the practical constraints that working in the humid tropics places of identifying and excavating new a...
Article
Full-text available
Shell middens are particularly susceptible to post-depositional processes that can rework and redistribute material through a deposit. As archaeological material is moved from its original primary context, the assumption that a temporal connection exists with spatially associated material becomes tenuous. It therefore becomes critical to identify d...
Article
Full-text available
A small marine pearl was recovered at the Brremangurey rockshelter, on the Kimberley coast, from layers dating to approximately 2000 years ago. In an area famous for its pearls and history of cultured pearl production, public interest centred on whether the pearl was as old as the layer in which it was contained, or whether it was a recent cultured...
Book
Full-text available
This publication is the volume of the ICAZ Archaeomalacology Working group of the proceedings of the 11th International Conference of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), which was held in Paris (France) 23rd-28th August 2010. Twenty-three papers are published with evidences of human collection and modification of shells from all ov...
Article
Full-text available
We report on previously unknown early archaeological sites in the Bolivian lowlands, demonstrating for the first time early and middle Holocene human presence in western Amazonia. Multidisciplinary research in forest islands situated in seasonally-inundated savannahs has revealed stratified shell middens produced by human foragers as early as 10,00...
Data
Trivial names and IUPASC names of analysed steroids and external standards used. (DOCX)
Data
Faunal remains and burnt earth from SM1. (DOCX)
Data
Methods of soil steroid and benzene-polycarboxylic acids detection. (DOCX)
Data
Chromatograms of masses 129 and 215 of a shell midden sample taken at 75 cm depth. Soil matrix was dominated by shell debris. TLE is low at 0.06 mg g−1. (TIF)
Data
Location of the paleosol samples reported in table 1 and table 2. Numbers indicate the code of the cores. (TIF)
Data
Total lipid extract (TLE) and steroid composition in shell midden SM1 and in soil samples from the surrounding savannah. (DOCX)
Article
In the early 1900s thirteen engraved Conus shell valuables were dug from prehistoric midden mounds in Oro Province. Since the early 1970s nineteen undated surface finds have been found in the northern Massim of Milne Bay Province. When three artifacts became available for AMS radiocarbon dating, provided they were restored after sampling to their o...
Article
Hermit crabs are ever alert for more suitable shells to inhabit, but what this may mean for coastal shell middens has rarely been considered. Here, the impact of the most landward-based of hermit crab families, the tropical Coenobitidae, upon archaeological shell-bearing deposits is assessed using a case-study: the Neolithic Ugaga site from Fiji. A...
Article
Full-text available
In the early 1900s thirteen engraved Conus shell valuables were dug from prehistoric midden mounds in Oro Province. Since the early 1970s nineteen undated surface finds have been found in the northern Massim of Milne Bay Province. When three artifacts became available for AMS radiocarbon dating, provided they were restored after sampling to their o...
Article
Batadomba-lena, a rockshelter in the rainforest of southwestern Sri Lanka, has yielded some of the earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in South Asia. H. sapiens foragers were present at Batadomba-lena from ca. 36,000 cal BP to the terminal Pleistocene and Holocene. Human occupation was sporadic before the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Batadomba-...
Article
Full-text available
Over the course of the past two decades there has been growing research interest in the site formation processes of shell middens. This stands along-side and is being used to inform cultural, dietary and palaeo-environmental reconstructions. Just as midden site formation processes have turned out to be many and varied, however, the kinds of shell-b...
Article
The vast Asia-Pacific region, spanning from the islands of Indonesia and Borneo in the west through Melanesia, Micronesia, and West Polynesia in the east, is a panorama of water and islands. Encompassing the “coral triangle”, this region is the most speciose of the global marine biogeographic provinces with a mosaic of high-biomass habitats such as...