Katherine Isbister

Katherine Isbister
University of California, Santa Cruz | UCSC · Department of Computational Media

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62
Publications
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825
Citations

Publications

Publications (62)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There is an open call for technology to be more playful and for the design of tech to be more inclusive of people with disabilities. In the era of COVID19, it is often unsafe for the public in general and people with disabilities in particular to engage in in-person design exercises using traditional methods. This presents a missed opportunity as t...
Preprint
Despite the capacity of play to spontaneously emerge in our daily life, the scope of application of play design in HCI is generally narrower, specifically targeting areas of pure leisure, or wholly utilitarian and productive play. Here we focus on the value of play design to respond to and support our natural gravitation towards emergent play that...
Preprint
In this paper, we respond to recent calls for more playfulness in gastronomy by discussing Interaction Design inspired strategies to craft food experiences that are more social, emergent, and fun. First, we discuss the state of play in gastronomy, highlighting opportunities for an increasingly interactive approach to food design. Then, we present s...
Conference Paper
Game designers and developers have long been at the vanguard of creating technology-enhanced experiences to evoke and encourage connection among people. Consider for example the creation of home game consoles in the 1970s--a rich shared-screen engaging multi-person experience offered far earlier than business applications for computer-supported coo...
Chapter
In November 2010, Microsoft released the Kinect sensor as a new input device for the Xbox 360 gaming console, and more recently the “next generation” of Kinect was released in November 2013 as part of the Xbox One entertainment system. Kinect enables users to control and interact with on-screen elements by moving their bodies in space (e.g., move c...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
All the Feels is a tool developed to incorporate biometric data into online gameplay streams. The tool displays heart rate and GSR (galvanic skin response) information to stream spectators, taken from the player in real-time, through the use of a commercially available wearable device. The tool also provides emotion labeling information input from...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The immense proliferation of videogames over the course of recent decades has yielded a discoverability problem that has largely been unaddressed. Though this problem affects all videogame stakeholders, we limit our concerns herein to the particular context of game designers seeking prior work that could inform their own ideas or works in progress....
Article
In November 2010, Microsoft released the Kinect sensor as a new input device for the Xbox 360 gaming console, and more recently the “next generation” of Kinect was released in November 2013 as part of the Xbox One entertainment system. Kinect has the ability to detect multiple points of skeletal movement, differentiating among multiple simultaneous...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a design case study of Yamove!, a well-received dance battle game. The primary aim for the project was to design a mobile-based play experience that enhanced in-person social interaction and connection. The game emphasized the pleasures of mutual, improvised amateur movement choreography at the center of the experience, achieved...
Chapter
During the last decade, we have witnessed an increased interest in social play in digital games. With this comes an urge to understand better how to design and evaluate for this new form of play. In this chapter, we encapsulate best practices for game design and evaluation, grounded in other game researchers’ work, as well as our own research and p...
Article
Movement-based digital games are becoming increasingly popular, yet there is limited comprehensive guidance on how to design these games. In this article we discuss a set of guidelines for movement-based game design that were initially presented at CHI 2014 (Mueller & Isbister, 2014). These guidelines were developed through reflection upon our rese...
Article
We present an ongoing project exploring the use of costumes as game controllers. This collaboration between an artist and a researcher involves creating and evaluating a game for two players that uses costumes to drive core mechanics and interactions. We aim to give players a sense of transformation and connection, and to create an engaging spectac...
Article
Most technology-supported dance games result in gameplay that looks very different than what we know as social dancing. For that matter, most 'social' games can involve a lot of solo staring at screens. Our lab re-examined the role of technology in supporting the dance experience, working with indie game developers and dancers to understand how to...
Article
Demo Hour highlights new prototypes and projects that exemplify innovation and novel forms of interaction.Leah Maestri, EditorThe Art Explorations track at TEI 2012 featured interactive artworks that explore the intersections ...
Chapter
Character faces are becoming increasingly important as game graphics capabilities and processing power allow for more visibility of and subtlety in facial expression. What was not possible 20 years ago (when conveying a smile or frown in a sprite (a player character image on-screen during gameplay) was an achievement), is now limited only by the de...
Article
This article introduces a collaborative project between NTT's Open Lab, Kyoto University's Department of Social Informatics and Stanford University's Communication Department. We created an agent prototype that was designed to support human-human communication in virtual environments. The prototype mimics a party host, trying to find a safe common...
Article
This paper introduces a collaborative project between NTT's Open Lab, Kyoto University's Department of Social Informatics, and Stanford University's Communication Department. We created an agent prototype designed to support human-human communication in virtual environments. The prototype mimics a party host trying to find a safe common topic for g...

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