Katherine Hennessey

Katherine Hennessey
American University of Kuwait | AUK · Deans' Office/English Department

PhD, English/Irish Studies

About

20
Publications
1,213
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21
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
21 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810

Publications

Publications (20)
Chapter
The Arab world has a long, complex, and vibrant history of engagement with Shakespeare’s work, in translation, adaptation, and theatrical and cinematic performance. It thus is fitting that the Middle East’s most impressive celebration of Shakespeare’s legacy during the 2016 Year of Shakespeare took place in Egypt’s Bibliotheca Alexandrina (BA), the...
Article
This article opens with some brief observations on the phenomenon of Arab blackface—that is, of Arab actors “blacking up” to impersonate black Arab or African characters—from classic cinematic portrayals of the warrior-poet Antara Ibn Shaddad to more recent deployments of blackface in the Arab entertainment industry. It then explores the complex ne...
Chapter
This chapter explores William Shakespeare's relationship to world literature, first by examining the fascination his own work evinces with literatures and geographies beyond England's, and the cosmopolitanism and globalization of Elizabethan London. It then explores the paths by which, over the course of centuries, Shakespeare's works have traveled...
Chapter
Most performances of Shakespeare at universities in the Arabian Gulf take place in English rather than Arabic, and at private liberal arts universities or at US and European branch campuses or offshoots. Yet, as the author argues, in both directorial vision and audience reception, these performances are often intimately imbricated with contemporary...
Chapter
This chapter examines the ways in which Shakespeare is constructed as an object of study throughout the Peninsula—how his works are taught in university level classes, presented in seminars and public events, and celebrated at conferences and symposia, and what types of classroom and public discussions can spring up around them in the face of the G...
Chapter
This chapter examines Kuwaiti theatre’s complex and surprisingly vibrant relationship to Shakespeare. Its central focus is the Shakespearean drama of British-Kuwaiti playwright Sulayman Al Bassam and the plays performed by his theatre companies Zaoum and SABAB. These include The 60-Watt Macbeth, Hamlet in Kuwait and his Arab Shakespeare Trilogy (AS...
Chapter
This chapter provides a historical survey of performances of Shakespeare in Yemen and the Arabian Gulf in the twentieth century. Among the productions considered are Yemeni adaptations of Julius Caesar and Hamlet (the former performed in 1948 as a commentary on the British colonial occupation of Aden, the latter as a reflection upon the violence of...
Chapter
In this chapter, the author focuses upon Arabic-language Shakespearean performances on the Peninsula, including Omani playwright Ahmad al-Izki’s incorporation of Othello into his play The Dark Night; a Yemeni Merchant of Venice, directed by Amin Hazaber; German filmmaker Michael Roes’s cinematic adaptation of Macbeth, shot with a cast of Yemeni act...
Chapter
This chapter investigates independent, local performances of Shakespeare on the Arabian Peninsula—Shakespeare as performed by locally based theatre troupes, run by expatriates or by nationals, using English as a lingua franca. Such troupes’ efforts act as a counterbalance to forces that render Gulf communities segregated and transient by providing...
Book
Since the turn of the millennium, the Arabian Peninsula has produced a remarkable series of adaptations of Shakespeare. These include a 2007 production of Much Ado About Nothing, set in Kuwait in 1898; a 2011 performance in Sharjah of Macbeth, set in 9th-century Arabia; a 2013 Yemeni adaptation of The Merchant of Venice, in which the Shylock figure...
Chapter
This chapter analyses productions of Shakespeare imported to the Gulf from elsewhere—generally professional-quality shows that have won prior accolades at international performing arts venues, and for which the main rationale seems to be entertainment, profit and the creation of a (passive) culture of theatre-going. From the mega-stages of the Gulf...
Chapter
This chapter introduces the phenomenon of Shakespeare on the Arabian Peninsula. Vignettes of three recent performances—an adaptation of The Merchant of Venice performed in Sana’a, a community theatre production of The Tempest in Doha and Macbeth staged by a touring company in Kuwait—illustrate the diversity of languages, aims, adaptation strategies...
Chapter
The Conclusion examines Shakespeare-themed performances and events across the Arabian Peninsula in 2016, ‘The Year of Shakespeare’. War and humanitarian crisis in Yemen effectively precluded 2016 celebrations of Shakespeare there (and also prevented the Shakespeare’s Globe round-the-world tour of Hamlet from reaching Yemeni soil). In the Gulf, conv...
Article
A recent work of theatre from Oman, Ahmad al-Izkī's al-Layla al-Hālika (The Dark Night, 2010), weaves together themes and characters from Shakespeare's Othello and the pre-Islamic epic 'Antara Ibn Shaddād, imagining a series of encounters which ultimately allow the protagonists to escape the tragic ending of Shakespeare's play. This article argues...
Article
Full-text available
This article analyzes four plays performed in Yemen between 2009 and 2013, under challenging and at times perilous circumstances. Though differing widely in form, each of these productions stages the existential struggle of an individual who rebels against the forces of authority within his or her community. As such, these plays represent the quint...
Article
Armed tribesmen attacked the Cultural Center in the Yemeni capital of Sanaa, demanding that the activity in progress be stopped immediately. The tribesmen stopped the play, as they believed that the portrayal of the love story and family feud besmirched their collective reputation. The actual fact was the tribesmen were afraid of the power of theat...