Katherine M. Giljohann

Katherine M. Giljohann
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of BioSciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

21
Publications
5,301
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574
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2011 - present
University of Melbourne

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Surveys aimed at finding threatened and invasive species can be challenging due to individual rarity and low and variable individual detection rates. Detection rate in plant surveys typically varies due to differences among observers, among the individual plants being surveyed (targets), and across background environments. Interactions among these...
Article
Full-text available
Fire shapes ecosystems globally, including semi-arid ecosystems. In Australia, semi-arid ‘mallee’ ecosystems occur primarily across the southern part of the continent, forming an interface between the arid interior and temperate south. Mallee vegetation is characterized by short, multi-stemmed eucalypts that grow from a basal lignotuber. Fire shape...
Article
Fire has shaped Australia's diverse mammal fauna for millennia. However, ongoing changes to fire regimes threaten native mammal populations, and a significant conservation challenge is to understand and promote desirable forms of pyrodiversity (variation in fire regimes). A way forward is to quantify how different aspects of pyrodiversity influence...
Article
Biodiversity faces many threats and these can interact to produce outcomes that may not be predicted by considering their effects in isolation. Habitat loss and fragmentation (hereafter 'fragmentation') and altered fire regimes are important threats to biodiversity, but their interactions have not been systematically evaluated across the globe. In...
Article
Full-text available
Fire has been a source of global biodiversity for millions of years. However, interactions with anthropogenic drivers such as climate change, land use, and invasive species are changing the nature of fire activity and its impacts. We review how such changes are threatening species with extinction and transforming terrestrial ecosystems. Conservatio...
Article
Full-text available
Knowing where species occur is fundamental to many ecological and environmental applications. Species distribution models (SDMs) are typically based on correlations between species occurrence data and environmental predictors, with ecological processes captured only implicitly. However, there is a growing interest in approaches that explicitly mode...
Article
Full-text available
Conserving animals and plants in fire-prone landscapes requires evidence of how fires affect modified ecosystems. Despite progress on this front, fire ecology is restricted by a dissonance between two dominant paradigms: ‘fire mosaics’ and ‘functional types’. The fire mosaic paradigm focuses on animal responses to fire events and spatial variation,...
Article
Global change is threatening ecosystems and biodiversity worldwide, creating a pressing need to understand how climate and disturbance regimes interact and influence the persistence of species. We quantify how three ecosystem drivers – rainfall, fire and herbivory – influence vital rates in the perennial resprouting graminoid, Triodia scariosa, a f...
Article
Invasive populations are often irregularly distributed due to sporadic dispersal events and patchy distribution of suitable habitat, making it difficult to recognize the population boundary and effectively target management. We designed a survey prioritization that addresses these irregularities and tested it on an invasive King Devil Hawkweed (Hie...
Article
Preservation of biodiversity is a central goal of conservation management, yet the conditions that promote persistence may differ for the species in the community. For systems subject to stochastic disturbances such as fire, understanding which management practices promote persistence for all species in a community is complex. Before deciding on th...
Article
Full-text available
Human perception of plant leaf and flower colour can influence species management. Colour and colour contrast may influence the detectability of invasive or rare species during surveys. Quantitative, repeatable measures of plant colour are required for comparison across studies and generalisation across species. We present a standard method for mea...
Data
In-situ photographs of the nine yellow flowering species and models of the two invasive Hieracium species used in the experiment. (TIF)
Data
Photograph of a 1m2 quadrat showing the yellow flowering Craspediaaurantia - C. jamesii complex. (TIF)
Data
Leaves of the five species collected to compare camera reliability. (TIF)
Data
R code to extract CIE 1976 (L*a*b*) values from TIF file. (DOC)
Data
L*, a* and b* histograms of flowers used in the study. The recorded distribution is shown with black circles, and the modelled distribution (Gaussian using mean and sd) is shown as a grey line. (TIF)
Data
L*, a* and b* histograms of leaves used in the study. The recorded distribution is shown with black circles, and the modelled distribution (Gaussian using mean and sd) is shown as a grey line. (TIF)
Article
Plant and animal survey detection rates are important for ecological surveys, environmental impact assessment, inva-sive species monitoring, and modeling species distributions. Species can be difficult to detect when rare but, in general, how detection probabilities vary with abundance is unknown. We developed a new detectability model based on the...
Article
Full-text available
Two highly invasive hawkweeds, Hieracium aurantiacum and H. praealtum L., have established in the Australian Alps. Our experiments aimed to provide a better understanding of the seed ecology of these species, essential if successful eradication strategies are to be developed. Results indicated that viable seeds are produced in large numbers. Seeds...
Article
1. A key problem facing invasive species management is how best to allocate surveillance and control effort. Models of the establishment and spread of invasive species are widely used to predict species’ occurrence across space and inform resource prioritization. However, the way they should be used to direct control effort is less clear. Managers...

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