Katherine Bayly

Katherine Bayly
Monash University (Australia) · Department of Microbiology

Bachelor of Science (Honours)

About

6
Publications
912
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113
Citations

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Carbon monoxide (CO) gas is infamous for its acute toxicity. This toxicity predominantly stems from its tendency to form carbonyl complexes with transition metals, thus inhibiting the heme-prosthetic groups of proteins, including respiratory terminal oxidases. While CO has been proposed as an antibacterial agent, the evidence supporting its toxicit...
Article
Full-text available
Diverse aerobic bacteria persist by consuming atmospheric hydrogen (H2) using group 1h [NiFe]-hydrogenases. However, other hydrogenase classes are also distributed in aerobes, including the group 2a [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Based on studies focused on Cyanobacteria, the reported physiological role of the group 2a [NiFe]-hydrogenase is to recycle H2 prod...
Preprint
Full-text available
Diverse aerobic bacteria persist by consuming atmospheric hydrogen (H2) using group 1h [NiFe]-hydrogenases. However, other hydrogenase classes are also distributed in aerobes, including the group 2a [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Based on studies focused on Cyanobacteria, the reported physiological role of the group 2a [NiFe]-hydrogenase is to recycle H2 prod...
Preprint
Full-text available
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas infamous for its acute toxicity. The toxicity of CO predominantly stems from its tendency to form carbonyl complexes with transition metals, thus inhibiting the heme-prosthetic groups of proteins, including the terminal oxidases of the respiratory chain. While CO has been proposed as an antibacterial agent, the evidenc...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous atmospheric trace gas produced by natural and anthropogenic sources. Some aerobic bacteria can oxidize atmospheric CO and, collectively, they account for the net loss of ~250 teragrams of CO from the atmosphere each year. However, the physiological role, genetic basis, and ecological distribution of this process...
Preprint
Full-text available
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous atmospheric trace gas produced by natural and anthropogenic sources. Some aerobic bacteria can oxidize atmospheric CO and, collectively, they account for the net loss of ~250 teragrams of CO from the atmosphere each year. However, the physiological role, genetic basis, and ecological distribution of this process...

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