Katharine M Johnson

Katharine M Johnson
North Carolina State University | NCSU · North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies

9.9
 · 
PhD, Geography

About

13
Publications
1,604
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152
Citations
Introduction
I am a human-environment geographer and archaeologist. I use LiDAR and other forms of remote sensing to study how historic land use practices and settlement have influenced the modern landscape, and how these impacts can be quantified to contribute to a broader understanding of the Anthropocene. I am currently exploring these processes in the northeastern US. I am also interested in data visualization, geospatial technology, 3D modeling, and web development. I currently work as a web developer and GIS specialist on the technical support unit for the National Climate Assessment at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information.
Education
August 2012 - August 2016
University of Connecticut
Field of study
  • Geography
September 2010 - May 2011
University of Massachusetts Boston
Field of study
  • Geographic Information Technology
September 2006 - August 2009
University of Massachusetts Boston
Field of study
  • Historical Archaeology

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Recently, light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data has been made publicly available for the states of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island in New England, a geographic region in the northeastern United States. Despite the wide range of archaeological studies that have been undertaken with LiDAR on a global scale, few published studies exist...
Article
English-style agriculture in the northeastern United States spurred widespread deforestation beginning in the 17th century. Heavy plowing within a rocky, glacial till-mantled landscape resulted in soil erosion and deep frosts. For hundreds of years, stones exposed at the surface due to these processes were built into walls that have become an iconi...
Article
Relict charcoal hearths are round or elliptical earthen platforms up to 11 m in diameter and a widespread feature of historical industry that supplied charcoal used in the production of iron in furnaces or smelters. The iron industry dominated Litchfield County, Connecticut, and surrounding areas in the northeast United States throughout the 19th c...
Article
High resolution airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) has become a commonly used resource on a global scale to study landscapes and associated cultural features, especially in areas covered by dense forest. While LiDAR allows for unprecedented views of the terrain beneath the forest canopy, and of landscapes at broad scales generally, few st...
Article
Increasing availability and advancements of aerial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data have radically been shifting the way archaeological surveys are performed. Unlike optical remote sensing imagery, LiDAR pulses travel through small gaps in dense tree canopies enabling archaeologists to discover ‘hidden’ past settlements and anthropogenic la...
Conference Paper
Landscape evolution in post-industrial southern New England reflects an industrial past revealed on LiDAR imagery and by field studies in the now-wooded landscape. Construction of >20,000 earthen platforms for charcoal production (mounds) in an area of 2450 km2 affected hillslope processes and altered soil development in Litchfield County (northwes...
Conference Paper
This paper uses remote sensing and geospatial techniques to examine the distribution, morphology, and characteristics of charcoal production, landscape change and Anthropocene processes in southern New England. Southern New England’s landscape preserves a diverse array of historic human impacts whose legacy continues through today. One such impact...
Conference Paper
LiDAR has become a well-established resource used to enhance spatial knowledge of the archaeological landscape in Europe, Central America, Canada and limited locations in North America including the United States. Despite this, no published studies have been undertaken in southeastern New England. Recently, LiDAR data has been made publicly availab...
Article
Full-text available
Research on the Waite-Kirby-Potter house in Westport, Massachusetts, included mapping historical resources visible on the surface and excavating 25 test pits and units near the house foundations in the fall of 2009. Field investigations were complemented by extensive documentary research including a complete chain of title and genealogical research...

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