Katharina Stracke

Katharina Stracke
University of Bergen | UiB · Department of Biological Science

BSc MSc PhD AFHEA

About

4
Publications
661
Reads
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39
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2021 - present
University of Bergen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2020 - January 2021
The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research
Position
  • Research Assistant
July 2016 - December 2019
Gene Technology Access Centre
Gene Technology Access Centre
Position
  • Student Mentor
Education
April 2016 - December 2019
University of Melbourne
Field of study
  • Molecular Parasitology
April 2013 - March 2016
RWTH Aachen University
Field of study
  • Molecular and Cellular Biology
October 2009 - March 2013
University of Wuerzburg
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Soil-transmitted helminths, such as roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides), whipworms (Trichuris trichiura) and hookworms (Necator americanus and Ancylostoma spp.), are gastrointestinal parasites that occur predominantly in low- to middle-income countries worldwide and disproportionally impact children. Depending on the STH species, health status of the...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular studies of gastrointestinal infections or microbiotas require either rapid sample processing or effective interim preservation. This is difficult in remote settings in low-income countries, where the majority of the global infectious disease burden exists. Processing or freezing of samples immediately upon collection is often not feasible...
Article
Full-text available
Hookworm infections are classified as the most impactful of the human soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections, causing a disease burden of ∼4 million disability-adjusted life years, with a global prevalence of 406-480 million infections. Until a decade ago, epidemiological surveys largely assumed Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale as t...
Article
Full-text available
Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) are a major cause of morbidity in tropical developing countries with a global infection prevalence of more than one billion people and disease burden of around 3.4 million disability adjusted life years. Infection prevalence directly correlates to inadequate sanitation, impoverished conditions and limited access to...

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