Katharina Ruthsatz

Katharina Ruthsatz
Technische Universität Braunschweig · Biologie

Dr. rer. nat.

About

14
Publications
2,618
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
92
Citations

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Global changes in temperature, predator introductions, and pollution might challenge animals by altering food conditions. A fast-growing source of environmental pollution are microplastics. If ingested with the natural food source, microplastics act as artificial fibers that reduce food quality by decreasing nutrient and energy density with possibl...
Article
Full-text available
Temperature-induced developmental plasticity could allow amphibian larvae to complete metamorphosis successfully despite new thermal challenges and increased desiccation risk due to climate change. Here we investigated how the capacity for temperature-induced developmental plasticity varies with latitude and whether population-specific biogeographi...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity may allow ectotherms with complex life histories such as amphibians to cope with climate-driven changes in their environment. Plasticity in thermal tolerance (i.e., shifts of thermal limits via acclimation to higher temperatures) has been proposed as a mechanism to cope with warming and extreme thermal events. However, thermal...
Article
Full-text available
In Brazil’s Atlantic Forest (AF) biodiversity conservation is of key importance since the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has led to the rapid loss of amphibian populations here and worldwide. The impact of Bd on amphibians is determined by the host's immune system, of which the skin microbiome is a critical component. The richn...
Article
Full-text available
Effective conservation actions require knowledge on the sensitivity of species to pollution and other anthropogenic stressors. Many of these stressors are endocrine disruptors (EDs) that can impair the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis and thus alter thyroid hormone (TH) levels with physiological consequences to wildlife. Due to their specific ha...
Article
Analyses of stable isotope ratios are widely applied in studies on a large variety of aspects in trophic ecology. Most studies rely on a precise estimation of the relevant discrimination factor Δ (also called the fractionation factor), that reflects the fractionation or differences in isotope ratios of a certain element (mainly nitrogen N and carbo...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental stress induced by natural and anthropogenic processes including climate change may threaten the productivity of species and persistence of populations. Ectotherms can potentially cope with stressful conditions such as extremes in temperature by exhibiting physiological plasticity. Amphibian larvae experiencing stressful environments d...
Article
Full-text available
Food conditions are changing due to anthropogenic activities and natural sources and thus, many species are exposed to new challenges. Animals might cope with altered quantitative and qualitative composition [i.e. variable protein, nitrogen (N) and energy content] of food by exhibiting trophic and digestive plasticity. We examined experimentally wh...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental change exposes wildlife to a wide array of environmental stressors that arise from both anthropogenic and natural sources. Many environmental stressors with the ability to alter endocrine function are known as endocrine disruptors, which may impair the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis resulting in physiological consequences to wild...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental variation induced by natural and anthropogenic processes including climate change may threaten species by causing environmental stress. Anuran larvae experiencing environmental stress may display altered thyroid hormone (TH) status with potential implications for physiological traits. Therefore, any capacity to adapt to environmental...
Article
Chemical, physical and biological environmental stressors may affect the endocrine system, such as the thyroid hormone (TH) axis in larval amphibians with consequences for energy partitioning among development, growth and metabolism. We studied the effects of two TH level affecting compounds, exogenous l‐thyroxine (T4) and sodium perchlorate (SP),...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
We aim to demonstrate global (climate) change impacts on freshwater fish and amphibians. To do so, we use a meta-analytical approach. Furthermore, we investigate whether environmental stressors associated with global (climate) change affect the capacity to show phenotypic plasticity in both taxa.
Project
Alterations in abiotic and biotic environmental factors caused by drivers of global change expose wildlife to an array of additional chemical, physical, and biological stressors. Some environmental stressors have the ability to alter endocrine function and are thus, characterized as endocrine disruptors. Many endocrine disruptors impair the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis resulting in altered thyroid hormone (TH) levels, which is of special concern in larval amphibians since amphibian metamorphosis is the classical and unique example of thyroid hormone-regulated development. Larval amphibians have been shown to respond to stressful conditions in their larval habitat by exhibiting developmental and physiological plasticity which provides a means for increasing fitness in later life stages. Nevertheless, ongoing global change will result in multiple simultaneously occurring environmental stressors in larval habitats, but studies investigating interactive effects of those environmental stressors are still rare. Considering the current worldwide decline of amphibians it is of major interest to investigate whether and how anuran larvae adjust their metamorphic and physiological traits to new thermal challenges and to altered TH levels, which are caused by natural or anthropogenic stressors in their larval habitat. We investigate the capacity for developmental and physiological plasticity at the onset of metamorphosis in larvae of two anuran species, the common frog (Rana temporaria) and the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), which differ in their ecology and thermal adaptation. In particular, we analyse whether developmental temperature, altered TH levels, and the interactive effect of both affect survival to and age, size, body condition, thermal tolerance, and standard metabolic rate at the onset of metamorphosis. We further evaluated whether the endocrine-disrupting effect of environmental stressors modifies this capacity and influences energetic costs and energy allocation during the metamorphic climax. Beyond that, we examine possible carry-over effects on energetics and performance in later life stages caused by endocrine disruption experienced during the larval stage. This study provides a comprehensive investigation of several fitness related traits and the potential and limitations of adaptability to environmental stress during the larval stage in two ecologically different species.