Katharina Lefringhausen

Katharina Lefringhausen
Heriot-Watt University · School of Social Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

20
Publications
33,938
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
420
Citations
Introduction
I explore host country nationals globalisation-based proximal-acculturation, how to measure it, what it relates to and what are its antecedents. Thus, I ask which acculturation strategy do majority members follow? Which strategy relates to more well-being or less turnover intentions at a multicultural workplace? How can majority members' acculturation be enhanced through IC training? Lastly, I am also interested in how to assess culture (values, norms, beliefs, etc.).
Education
September 2010 - October 2011
Brunel University London
Field of study
  • Cross-Cultural Psychology

Publications

Publications (20)
Conference Paper
The Multicultural Ideology Scale (Berry, Kalin & Taylor, 1977) was developed to examine the views of Canadians toward the two basic principles in the Canadian multiculturalism policy (1971): the promotion of cultural diversity as a personal and public good; and the acceptance of social engagements among individual members of all cultural communitie...
Article
How do English majority members’ national culture maintenance and immigrant culture adoption (i.e., globalisation-based proximal-acculturation) predict their acculturation expectations (i.e., how they think immigrants should acculturate) and intergroup ideologies (i.e., how they think society should manage diversity)? Cross-sectional results ( N =...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
Acculturation is commonly defined as a process of “mutual accommodation”. Yet, existing research has largely focused on cultural and psychological changes among immigrants and people identifying as minority-group members rather than studying these changes among majority-group members. With the current special issue, we wish to initiate a new genera...
Preprint
Full-text available
How do English majority members’ national culture maintenance and immigrant culture adoption (i.e., globalisation-based proximal-acculturation) predict their acculturation expectations (i.e., how they think immigrants should acculturate) and intergroup ideologies (i.e., how they think society should manage diversity)? Cross-sectional results (N = 2...
Article
Full-text available
In many countries, individuals who have represented the majority group historically are decreasing in relative size and/or perceiving that they have diminished status and power compared with those self-identifying as immigrants or members of ethnic minority groups. These developments raise several salient and timely issues, including (a) how majori...
Article
Full-text available
Although the ways that immigrants relate to UK culture has been a hot topic since the EU-referendum, little attention has been given to how majority group members such as Host Country Nationals (HCNs) relate to immigrants' culture. Thus, we explored English HCNs' globalisation-based proximal-acculturation-the extent to which they prefer to adopt as...
Article
Full-text available
Acculturation is commonly conceptualized as a two-way process in which all groups involved in intercultural contact change. Yet, very little is known about the acculturation orientations of majority-group members and the factors that differentiate those who adopt aspects of minority groups’ culture from those who reject them. In the present researc...
Article
Full-text available
What motivates majority group members to adapt to or reject cultural diversity? Considering the relevance of personal values on our attitudes and behaviors, we inspected how self-protection and growth predict levels of discriminatory behavioral and cultural adaptation intentions towards migrants via intergroup contact and perceived intergroup threa...
Article
What motivates majority group members to adapt to or reject cultural diversity? Considering the relevance of personal values on our attitudes and behaviours, we inspected how self‐protection and growth predict levels of discriminatory behavioural and cultural adaptation intentions towards migrants via intergroup contact and perceived intergroup thr...
Article
Full-text available
Twitter is one of the world’s most popular social networking sites, yet gaps remain in our knowledge about the psychology of its users. The current studies sought to fill these gaps by examining whether the Big Five and Dark Triad personality traits predicted differences between Twitter users and Facebook-only users, motives for using Twitter, the...
Article
Full-text available
Across two studies, we tested whether members of host communities (i.e., locals) can themselves simultaneously maintain their national culture maintenance and adapt toward cultural diversity (i.e., multiculturalism) in their own home country, supporting a bidimensional model of acculturation, or whether these strategies are incompatible, supporting...
Article
This article reports the construction of a new survey—specifically, the Brunel Ethnic Behavior Inventory (BEBI)—designed to measure ethnic speech and ethnic action as separate, yet related, aspects of individuals’ ethnic behavior. Using Tajfel’s social identity theory as a conceptual frame of reference, this study sought an answer to the research q...
Article
This study sought to validate the Brunel Ethnic Behavior Inventory (BEBI) as a measure of two aspects of “doing” (i.e., ethnic speech and ethnic action) among the “ways of ethnicity” identified by Verkuyten. It also evaluates the construct validity of the BEBI alongside the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure-Revised (MEIM-R) and evaluates the BEBI...
Article
Full-text available
Can personality traits predict willingness to fight or even die for one's heritage culture group? This study examined insecure attachment dimensions – avoidance and anxiety – as predictors of perceived rejection from heritage culture members and, in turn, greater endorsement of extreme pro-group actions. Expressing extreme commitment for the herita...
Article
Full-text available
Status updates are one of the most popular features of Facebook, but few studies have examined the traits and motives that influence the topics that people choose to update about. In this study, 555 Facebook users completed measures of the Big Five, self-esteem, narcissism, motives for using Facebook, and frequency of updating about a range of topi...
Article
Full-text available
Many families worldwide have at least one member with a behavioral or mental disorder, and yet the majority of the public fails to correctly recognize symptoms of mental illness. Previous research has found that Mental Health Literacy (MHL)—the knowledge and positive beliefs about mental disorders—tends to be higher in European and North American c...

Questions

Questions (5)
Question
Intercultural communication is often defined as a skill. Yet, in order to be a successful in communicating - let's say across two cultures - doesn't one need to be culturally adapted to both contexts? Or in other words, instead of developing intercultural communication skilss, should trainers not address acculturation first?
Question
Multiculturalism – a phenomenon which has been praised and damned, declared dead and reborn, never existing or omnipresent in living memory. But how to define this abstruse process, ideology, or thing?
This is a fundamental question considering the fact that how we understand the world influences our actions. Although a vast body of literature across disciplines (e.g., philosophy, politics, sociology, psychology and psychoanalysis) provides numerous interpretations, the public discourse has a very narrow perspective on this matter. In fact, when skimming through the media, political and sociological literature, it seems to me that multiculturalism in the public discourse is mostly understood in a decriptive/empirical and/or normative sense.
The latter is heavily discussed by scholars like Kymlicka, Cantle, Vertovec, and Modood.
Would you agree with me that these two forms - descriptive and normative- are the most popular or common understandings (or maybe different across countries - I am from Germany, living in the UK)? Do you know other sholars then the above mentioned within sociology or political science who would be worthwhile to have a look at?
Question
I am doing a PhD in Cross-CUltural Psychology and try to collect data in China. Quite a challenge as I look for Chinese employees who experience intercultural contact at their work place in China- either face to face - or via email, skype, etc. on a daily basis.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Extent present findings on HCNs' acculturation towards immigrants' cultures (Haugen & Kunst, 2017; Lefringhausen & Marshall, 2016) with regard to its impact on their psychological and sociocultural adjustment outcomes as well as relation to immigrants' acculturation strategies.