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Katharina Gerstner

Katharina Gerstner
BE-terna

PhD

About

24
Publications
19,753
Reads
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1,908
Citations
Introduction
Several reasons led to my decison to end my scientific career. Having gained expertise in statistics and programming I didn't search for long and started a position as BI Architect/Data engineer at BE-terna. Here, I like the practice of problem solving and the appreciation of my work through my customers.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - September 2018
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2016 - August 2016
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2015 - February 2015
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Introduction to Meta-Analysis in Ecology
Education
October 2005 - December 2010
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Field of study
  • Mathematics with minor subject ecology

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Meta‐analyses often encounter studies with incompletely reported variance measures (e.g., standard deviation values) or sample sizes, both needed to conduct weighted meta‐analyses. Here, we first present a systematic literature survey on the frequency and treatment of missing data in published ecological meta‐analyses showing that the majority of m...
Article
Full-text available
Although habitat loss is the predominant factor leading to biodiversity loss in the Anthropocene1,2, exactly how this loss manifests—and at which scales—remains a central debate3,4,5,6. The ‘passive sampling’ hypothesis suggests that species are lost in proportion to their abundance and distribution in the natural habitat7,8, whereas the ‘ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Biodiversity and ecosystem productivity vary across the globe, and considerable effort has been made to describe their relationships. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning research has traditionally focused on how experimentally controlled species richness affects net primary productivity (S → NPP) at small spatial grains. In contrast, the inf...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim Biodiversity and ecosystem productivity vary across the globe and considerable effort has been made to describe their relationships. Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning research has traditionally focused on how experimentally controlled species richness affects net primary productivity (S→NPP) at small spatial grains. In contrast, the influence...
Article
Most current research on land‐use intensification addresses its potential to either threaten biodiversity or to boost agricultural production. However, little is known about the simultaneous effects of intensification on biodiversity and yield. To determine the responses of species richness and yield to conventional intensification, we conducted a...
Chapter
A growing human population coupled with increasing per capita consumption, changing diets, increasing food waste, and ineffective regulation, have led to rising demands on ecosystems for the services they supply [1].
Article
Estimating biodiversity and its change in space and time poses serious methodological challenges. First, there has been a long debate on how to quantify biodiversity, and second, measurements of biodiversity and its change are scale-dependent. Therefore, comparisons of biodiversity metrics between communities are ideally carried out across scales....
Article
In ecology, the true causal structure for a given problem is often not known, and several plausible models and thus model predictions exist. It has been claimed that using weighted averages of these models can reduce prediction error, as well as better reflect model selection uncertainty. These claims, however, are often demonstrated by isolated ex...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Estimating biodiversity and its changes in space and time poses serious methodological challenges. First, there has been a long debate on how to quantify biodiversity, and second, measurements of biodiversity change are scale-dependent. Therefore comparisons of biodiversity metrics between communities are ideally carried out across scales. Simul...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use change is considered a major threat to biodiversity. Species–area relationships (SARs), which are often used to assess biodiversity changes, assume that land use leads to the loss of natural habitats. Yet, in regions with long land-use histories, such as Europe, many species have persisted in, or even depend on, landscapes heavily influenc...
Article
Full-text available
Plant species richness is essential for ecosystem functioning, resilience and ecosystem services, yet is globally threatened by anthropogenic land use, including management and modification of the natural environment. At broad scales, land-use effects are often simply modelled by habitat loss, assuming that transformed land becomes completely inhos...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological and evolutionary research increasingly uses quantitative synthesis of primary research studies (meta-analysis) for answering fundamental questions, informing environmental policy and summarizing results for decision makers. Knowing how meta-analysis works is important for researchers so that their research can have broader impact. Meta-a...
Article
Full-text available
Forest products provide an important source of income and wellbeing for rural smallholder communities across the tropics. Although tropical forest products frequently become over-exploited, only few studies explicitly address the dynamics of degradation in response to socioeconomic drivers. Our study addresses this gap by analyzing the factors driv...
Article
Full-text available
Species-area relationships (SARs) provide an avenue to model patterns of species richness and have recently been shown to vary substantially across regions of different climate, vegetation, and land cover. Given that a large proportion of the globe has been converted to agriculture, and considering the large variety in agricultural management pract...
Thesis
Full-text available
Human dominance of the Earth’s ecosystems has resulted in a dramatic decline of global biodiversity and thereby caused unforeseen changes in ecosystem patterns, processes and functions. A major threat to global biodiversity is anthropogenic land use which includes management and modification of the natural environment. Vascular plants are highly li...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity conservation and agricultural production are often seen as mutually exclusive objectives. Strategies for reconciling them are intensely debated. We argue that harmonization between biodiversity conservation and crop production can be improved by increasing our understanding of the underlying relationships between them. We provide a gen...
Article
Plant diversity is globally threatened by anthropogenic land use including management and modification of the natural environment. At regional and local scales, numerous studies world‐wide have examined land use and its effects on plant diversity, but evidence for declining species diversity is mixed. This is because, first, land use comes in many...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental heterogeneity is regarded as one of the most important factors governing species richness gradients. An increase in available niche space, provision of refuges and opportunities for isolation and divergent adaptation are thought to enhance species coexistence, persistence and diversification. However, the extent and generality of posi...
Article
Global and regional economic and environmental changes are increasingly influencing local land-use, livelihoods, and ecosystems. At the same time, cumulative local land changes are driving global and regional changes in biodiversity and the environment. To understand the causes and consequences of these changes, land change science (LCS) draws on a...
Article
Full-text available
Global and regional economic and environ-mental changes are increasingly influencing local land-use, livelihoods, and ecosystems. At the same time, cumulative local land changes are driving global and regional changes in biodiversity and the environment. To understand the causes and consequences of these changes, land change science (LCS) draws on...
Article
AimThe species-area relationship (SAR) is a prominent concept for predicting species richness and biodiversity loss. A key step in defining SARs is to accurately estimate the slope of the relationship, but researchers typically apply only one global (canonical) slope. We hypothesized that this approach is overly simplistic and investigated how geog...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Integrating land-use effects in a countryside species-area model to assess the distribution of plant species richness at broad scales.