Kate Tsui

Kate Tsui
Toyota Research Institute of North America · UX

About

45
Publications
7,972
Reads
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1,120
Citations

Publications

Publications (45)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This abstract summarizes some recent research on trust in autonomous vehicles and our proposal to promote trust between autonomous vehicles and pedestrians. We aim to develop a trust framework based on expectations, behaviors and communication between the pedestrian and the autonomous vehicle. We describe a user study that is designed to determine...
Chapter
A new era of robotics research is being driven by pressing societal problems and creating a transformation in the way that we envision human-robot interactions. In this chapter, we discuss three application domains that best capture both the promise and the challenges that this transformation has generated: the effort to build robots that support c...
Article
A significant amount of research has been conducted regarding the technical aspects of haptic feedback. However, the design of effective haptic feedback behaviors for controlling ground-based mobile robots is not yet well understood from a human-robot interaction perspective. Past research of haptic feedback behaviors for mobile robots has sometime...
Article
Full-text available
The quality of life of people with special needs, such as residents of healthcare facilities, may be improved through operating social telepresence robots that provide the ability to participate in remote activities with friends or family. However, to date, such platforms do not exist for this population. Methodology: Our research utilized an itera...
Article
Purpose – The authors believe that people with cognitive and motor impairments may benefit from using of telepresence robots to engage in social activities. To date, these systems have not been designed for use by people with disabilities as the robot operators. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach – The authors cond...
Article
Our research focuses on how a telepresence robot operator, the people with the robot, and the robot itself collaborate so that the operator reaches his/her intended destination. Our research requires higher levels of autonomous navigation so that the robot can, for example, go to a specified destination and follow a person. However, commercial tele...
Article
In this chapter, we address issues related to using mobile telepresence robotics for social interaction between people in different locations. We examine this problem space from three perspectives: (a) designing for the robot user, who is in a remote location; (b) designing for people near the robot, who are interacting with the user; and (c) desig...
Article
People with cognitive and/or motor impairments may benefit from using telepresence robots to engage in social activities. To date, these robots, their user interfaces, and their navigation behaviors have not been designed for operation by people with disabilities. We conducted an experiment in which participants (n=12) used a telepresence robot in...
Conference Paper
Our research focuses on how a telepresence robot operator, the people with the robot, and the robot itself collaborate so that the operator reaches his/her intended destination. Our research requires higher levels of autonomous navigation so that the robot can, for example, go to a specified destination and follow a person. However, commercial tele...
Conference Paper
Personal video conferencing is now a common occurrence in long distance interpersonal relationships. Telepresence robots additionally provide mobility to video conferencing, and people can converse without being restricted to a single vantage point. The metrics to explicitly quantify person to person interaction through a telepresence robot do not...
Article
This year's human-robot interaction (HRI) conference focuses on "robots in the loop" and how robots are capable of enhancing the experiences of human users in everyday life and work. Telepresence robots allow operators the ability to participate in remote locations through their mobility and live bidirectional audio and video feeds. Using robotic t...
Conference Paper
Telepresence robots are mobile robot platforms capable of providing two way audio and video communication. Recently there has been a surge in companies designing telepresence robots. We conducted a series of user studies at Google in Mountain View with two different commercially available telepresence robots. Based on the data collected from these...
Article
Robot control typically requires many physical joysticks, buttons, and switches. Taking inspiration from video game controllers, we have created a Dynamically Resizing, Ergonomic, and Multi-touch (DREAM) controller to allow for the development of a software-based operator control unit (SoftOCU). The DREAM Controller is created wherever a person pla...
Conference Paper
Telepresence robots can be thought of as embodied video conferencing on wheels. Companies producing these robots imagine them being used in a wide variety of situations (e.g., ad-hoc conversations at the office, inspections and troubleshooting at factories, and patient rounds at medical facilities). In July and August 2010, we examined office-relat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Controlling the movements of mobile robots, including driving the robot through the world and panning the robot's cameras, typically requires many physical joysticks, buttons, and switches. Operators will often employ a technique called "chording" to cope with this situation. Much like a piano player, the operator will simultaneously actuate multip...
Article
Full-text available
Wheelchair-mounted robotic arms have been commercially available for a decade. In order to operate these robotic arms, a user must have a high level of cognitive function. Our research fo-cuses on replacing a manufacturer-provided, menu-based interface with a vision-based system while adding autonomy to reduce the cognitive load. Instead of manual...
Article
Studies using Nomura et al.'s "Negative Attitude toward Robots Scale" (NARS) [1] as an attitudinal measure have featured robots that were perceived to be autonomous, indepen-dent agents. State of the art telepresence robots require an explicit human-in-the-loop to drive the robot around. In this paper, we investigate if NARS can be used with telepr...
Article
Wheelchair-mounted robotic arms have been commercially available for a decade. In order to operate these robotic arms, a user must have a high level of cognitive function. Our research focuses on replacing a manufacturer-provided, menu-based interface with a vision-based system while adding autonomy to reduce the cognitive load. Instead of manual t...
Article
Nomura et al. designed and piloted the Negative Attitude toward Robots Scale (NARS) in 2003 [18]. NARS has been used by researchers to understand the attitudes of different people towards robots under different circumstances. To our knowledge, NARS has only been used with robots perceived to be autonomous. Our goal was to evaluate if NARS could be...
Conference Paper
The field of human-robot interaction is new but growing rapidly. While there are now several established researchers in the field, many of the current human-robot interaction practitioners are students or recently graduated. This workshop, to be held in conjunction with the HRI 2010 Conference, aims to bring together graduate students to present th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Based on the results of the head-to-head comparison of finding problems with Nielsen's versus our heuristics, we assert that our set of heuristics shows promise for evaluating assitive robotics applications. This paper presents a set of heuristics for assistive robotics. While heuristics have been previously developed to address human-robot interac...
Conference Paper
As robots become more pervasive in society, people will find themselves actively interacting with robots, and also rushing past them without any explicit interaction. People are able to maneuver in crowded situations by speeding up or slowing down to slip in between open pockets where people are not standing or walking. Our research focuses on this...
Article
People with mild to medium cognitive impairments may have difficulty with remembering when to perform an activity of daily living (ADL). For people with more severe cognitive impairments, it can be difficult to learn and/or recall the sequence of steps needed to complete a task. In this paper, we present a survey of devices that provide step-by-ste...
Article
Full-text available
Robots have been developed for several assistive technology domains, including intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders, eldercare, and post-stroke rehabilitation. Assistive robots have also been used to promote independent living through the use of devices such as intelligent wheelchairs, assistive robotic arms, and external limb prostheses. Wor...
Article
Full-text available
The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, was pleased to present the 2009 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, March 23–25, 2009 at Stanford University. The titles of the nine symposia were Agents that Learn from Human Teachers, Benchm...
Conference Paper
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We examine affective vocalizations provided by human teach- ers to robotic learners. In unscripted one-on-one interac- tions, participants provided vocal input to a robotic dinosaur as the robot selected toy buildings to knock down. We find that (1) people vary their vocal input depending on the learner's performance history, (2) people do not wait...
Conference Paper
Multi-touch technologies hold much promise for the command and control of mobile robot teams. To improve the ease of learning and usability of these interfaces, we conducted an experiment to determine the gestures that people would naturally use, rather than the gestures they would be instructed to use in a pre-designed system. A set of 26 tasks wi...
Article
Full-text available
Assistive robotics have been developed for several domains, including autism, eldercare, intelligent wheelchairs, assistive robotic arms, external limb prostheses, and stroke rehabil-itation. Work in assistive robotics can be divided into two larger research areas: technology development, where new devices, software, and interfaces are created; and...
Conference Paper
Accessibility is a challenge for people with disabilities. Dif- ferences in cognitive ability, sensory impairments, motor dexterity, behavioral skills, and social skills must be taken into account when designing interfaces for assistive devices. Flexible interfaces tuned for individuals, instead of custom- built solutions, may benet a larger number...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Our environment is replete with visual cues intended to guide human navigation. For example, there are building directories at entrances and room numbers next to doors. By developing a robot wheelchair system that can interpret these cues, we will create a more robust and more usable system. This paper describes the design and development of our ro...
Conference Paper
Wheelchair mounted robotic arms can assist people that have severe physical handicaps with activities of daily life. Manufacturer-provided direct input devices may not correlate well to the user's motor skills and may require a high level of cognitive awareness. Our goal is to provide methods for independent manipulation of objects in unstructured...
Article
The presence of robots in the medical and healthcare fields is increasing. Commercially available medical and healthcare robots are in use by hospitals and nursing homes. Many more assistive, rehabilitation, and surgical robots are being developed at research institutions. In this paper, we examine the awareness of medical and healthcare profession...
Article
The number of clinical trials using robots has increased over the last ten years. It is not practical for all experiments to be clinical trials through the development cycle of a rehabilitation or assistive robot. How can system developers incorporate aspects of the clinical trials to gain credibility among clinicians during development period eval...
Article
Full-text available
We developed a set of heuristics that was tailored to the Assistive Robotics domain using the Model-Human Processor as a framework augmented with principles gleaned from the literature. Specifically, we examined the literature of cognitive science, interaction design for people with disabilities, and social robotics. We validated the heuristics via...
Article
Experimental design for human subject research must con-sider many factors. Who is the end-user? Is this population accessible for user testing? How many conditions will be tested? How many participants are needed? What types of data can be collected? How should the data be analyzed? This paper surveys experiments conducted in human-robot interacti...
Article
Nomura et al. had a goal of creating a psychological scale to examine people's attitudes, anxiety, and assumptions about robots as a means to understand how people would react to robots in everyday situations [1]–[3]. After development and refinement, NARS ("Negative Attitudes toward Robots Scale") was created in 2003 [1]. In 2004, Nomura et al. co...
Article
With the recent emergence of several new telepres-ence robot platforms, companies are investigating these technolo-gies for ad-hoc conversations beyond the conference room. This technology has the potential to increase cohesion for people who work in a remote location away from their team. We hypothesize that seniors and people with disabilities ma...

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Project (1)
Project
My research in this area explores highly significant questions related to human interactions with autonomous vehicles. This research has the potential to promote safety, productivity and sustainability. As autonomous vehicles like many other robots become increasingly central to our society it seems timely and important to understand how to promote their interactions with humans.