Kate G McAlpine

Kate G McAlpine
New Zealand Department of Conservation

PhD

About

29
Publications
5,025
Reads
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295
Citations
Introduction
I am a weed ecologist at the New Zealand Department of Conservation. My current research focus is on the ecology and impact of woody weed invasions. See some of my work stories on Instagram: @katemcweedatwork.
Additional affiliations
August 2001 - present
New Zealand Department of Conservation
Position
  • Weed Ecologist

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Fruit-eating animals play a key role in spreading non-native environmental weeds, via seed ingestion and subsequent dispersal. We reviewed available information on dispersal of fleshy-fruited environmental weeds in New Zealand. We found almost a third (32.9%) of 295 environmental weed species in New Zealand have fleshy fruits adapted for internal d...
Article
Full-text available
Pinus contorta is a widespread and ecologically damaging invasive tree in the southern hemisphere. Land managers want control methods that limit reinvasion by P. contorta and promote the recovery of native plant communities and ecosystem functions. Recovery of native vegetation may be slow if native seed supply is limited and/or introduced mammals...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, lowland forests have been depleted, fragmented, and degraded by land clearance and conversion by humans. Many remnants are also invaded by non-native plants and mammals, which can exacerbate biodiversity loss and impede ecosystem recovery. We examined the effects of non-native ground cover weeds and mammals on the seedling recruitment of...
Article
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The use of herbicide to control weeds in natural areas can cause non-target damage to resident native plant communities and compromise native restoration goals. We tested 'full' and 'reduced' (half) rates of herbicide (rates based on previous glasshouse trials) on the ground cover weed species tradescantia (Tradescantia fluminensis), plectranthus (...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive exotic tree and shrub species (woody weeds) form dense, monospecific stands in many areas of New Zealand. At some sites, the weed dies out naturally and is replaced by native species as succession proceeds, but at others the weed persists indefinitely. The ability to distinguish between these different trajectories is critical to effective...
Article
Full-text available
The species composition of the understory can be a key indicator of successional trajectories in the absence of disturbance at forested sites. We surveyed species composition and percent cover in the understory of 132 closed-canopy stands of 41 woody weed species throughout New Zealand as a first step in understanding potential successional traject...
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Full-text available
Grey willow (Salix cinerea) is widely established in New Zealand’s remaining swamps and fens, and in many areas has replaced endemic kahikatea (Dacrycarpus dacrydioides) forest. Conservation managers need to know how to restore willow-invaded wetlands to a resilient natural state, but knowledge on how to achieve this goal is limited. We planted kah...
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Full-text available
Pinus contorta (lodgepole pine) is invasive in many southern hemisphere countries, having spread extensively from original plantings. It is widely controlled to limit its spread and negative impacts, and is generally assumed to have little value for native plant biodiversity. We surveyed vegetation in two stands of montane wilding P. contorta fores...
Article
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Ecological impacts of three weed species of similar life form, Asparagus scandens, Plectranthus ciliatus and Tradescantia fluminensis, were investigated in six lowland forest remnants in New Zealand. All three species form dense, ground-covering mats of vegetation, and are tolerant of a broad range of light environments. Relationships between canop...
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Bone-seed, Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. monilifera (L.), is an environmental weed of coastal vegetation communities scattered throughout New Zealand. To assess the long-term implications for native forest regeneration in sites where bone-seed is present, we selected four study sites around Wellington, New Zealand, where bone-seed was abundant....
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Ecosystem services are the benefits people obtain from ecosystems, such as clean air, fresh water, and the pollination of crops. The aim of this literature review was to find empirical data illustrating the ways in which conservation land and conservation management activities affect ecosystem services. The widely-held belief that natural ecosystem...
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Seedling recruitment is a multi-phased process involving seed production, dispersal, germination, seedling establishment and subsequent survival. Understanding the factors that determine success at each stage of this process is of particular interest to scientists and managers seeking to understand how invasive species spread and persist, and ident...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Invasive species have been hypothesized to out-compete natives though either a Jack-of-all-trades strategy, where they are able to utilize resources effectively in unfavourable environments, a master-of-some, where resource utilization is greater than its competitors in favourable environments, or a combination of the two (Jack-and-master)...
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Full-text available
Despite long-standing international interest in the impact of weeds on ecosystems and biodiversity, there continues to be a dearth of studies published on the subject. This may be largely due to the fact that it is inordinately difficult to identify and measure 'impact', and then attribute cause to that effect. In this study we ask a) what we know...
Article
Full-text available
Berberis darwinii (Berberidaceae) is a serious environmental weed in New Zealand, capable of invading a range of different light environments from grazed pasture to intact forest. According to optimal partitioning models, some plants optimise growth under different environmental conditions by shifting biomass allocation among tissue types (e.g. roo...
Article
Berberis darwinii is an invasive tree species that is considered a serious threat to indigenous ecosystems and biodiversity conservation throughout New Zealand. I examined the recruitment dynamics of this species in order to identify traits contributing to invasion success, and thus pinpoint critical stages for management. In order to do this, I me...
Article
Full-text available
Seed germination of woody species was studied in treefall gaps in New Zealand to assess how environmental heterogeneity affects regeneration from seed. Gaps were created in a relictual Pinus radiata plantation destined for restoration to native forest. Seeds of the native species Alectryon excelsus, Macropiper excelsum, and Fuchsia excorticata, and...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
To determine seed-bank longevity and seedling shade tolerance of major invasive tree and shrub species in New Zealand, including Taiwan cherry, Chinese privet, tree privet, sycamore, grey willow, Douglas fir, brush wattle, and pine species
Project
To quantify light levels in invasive tree populations to determine a) how light levels vary by canopy species, and b) potential impacts on understory regeneration
Project
To better understand which invasive tree populations are likely to persist and which are likely to be replaced by native plant succession