Katarzyna Nowak

Katarzyna Nowak
University of Warsaw | UW · Faculty of Biology

PhD

About

58
Publications
25,919
Reads
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1,143
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in the behavior of threatened species, and in how behavioral flexibility affects species' capacity for persistence in human-dominated landscapes. In Tanzania, I helped mitigate conflict between people and elephants and set national conservation priorities. From 2013 to 2016, I researched risk, fear, and cognition in samango monkeys at two Afromontane sites in South Africa. From 2016-2017, I was a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow in the Africa Branch of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. I then visited Warner College at Colorado State University before embarking on a new project focused on the phenology of winter coat molt in mountain goats in relation to a warming climate. I'm currently based between the Yukon, Canada, and the U.S. and Poland.
Additional affiliations
October 2013 - March 2016
Durham University
Position
  • Researcher
April 2013 - present
University of the Free State, Qwaqwa, South Africa
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • http://postgraduate.ufs.ac.za/content.aspx?uid=55
February 2011 - June 2012
Princeton University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Evolution and the Behavior of the Sexes Spring 2011 & Spring 2012

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Using camera traps and direct observations, we recorded interactions between three species of giant sengi (Rhynchocyon sp.) and two insectivorous bird species from six forests in Tanzania. In all instances, the birds closely followed the giant sengis who were moving and foraging in the leaf litter. Given that the two bird species are insectivorous...
Article
Full-text available
The lives lost and economic costs of viral zoonotic pandemics have steadily increased over the past century. Prominent policymakers have promoted plans that argue the best ways to address future pandemic catastrophes should entail, “detecting and containing emerging zoonotic threats.” In other words, we should take actions only after humans get sic...
Article
Globally, more than 32,000 kilometers of barriers have been built at borders of over 70 countries, to stop human migration. Governments focus on securing their borders, often forgetting the impacts of such installations on nature and biodiversity. Studies of the effects of fencing policies are scarce, but evidence very high effectiveness of border...
Article
Women continue to be underrepresented and less visible in the fields of science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM). 500 Women Scientists created and launched in January 2018 a global (>140 countries to date), online, open-access directory of women in STEMM fields. This directory—recently renamed gage—now also includes gende...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report is intended to introduce One Health and serve as a working document to be adapted as an environmental non-governmental organization (ENGO) or other entity develops their inclusion and practice of One Health. Yukon ENGOs work on wildlife, land use planning, mining and energy issues, and One Health—a holistic approach—is intended to impro...
Preprint
Full-text available
Participatory approaches, such as community photography, can engage the public in questions of societal and scientific interest while helping advance understanding of ecological patterns and processes. We combined data extracted from community‐sourced, spatially explicit photographs with research findings from 2018 fieldwork in the Yukon, Canada, t...
Article
Full-text available
Conservationists don’t always agree about the best ways to reinforce the protection of nature. Debates about it can become confrontational. But at the heart of the issue is how to include more people in conservation efforts. As a group of scientists, we believe it is important to steer the discussion towards a more diverse and inclusive blueprint...
Article
Full-text available
Research suggests that wild animals in urban areas exhibit heightened behavioral flexibility when they encounter novel human-made objects, but most such studies compared responses in urban populations with those from disjunct populations in less disturbed environments. We therefore know little about intrapopulation variation in cognitive or behavio...
Article
Full-text available
The USA is the largest consumer of legally, internationally-traded wildlife. A proportion of this trade consists of species listed in the Appendices of CITES, and recorded in the CITES Trade Database. Using this resource, we quantified wildlife entering the USA for 82 of the most frequently recorded wildlife products and a range of taxonomic groups...
Article
Full-text available
A global online register of women scientists, ready to share their science, was established by a cohort of volunteer women from the grassroots organization 500 Women Scientists on January 17th, 2018. In less than one year, the database “Request a Woman Scientist” comprised over 7,500 women from 174 scientific disciplines and 133 countries. The data...
Technical Report
Full-text available
https://www.docdroid.net/ebFZGRJ/mountaingoats-klondikehighway-report-for-wcs-canada-feb-19-2019.pdf
Technical Report
Full-text available
In April 2018, the Mountain Goat Molt Project was initiated through a series of collaborations across multiple institutions to examine the patterns and phenology of mountain goats’ winter coat molt in relation to warming. Amassing a sample of over 500 photographs – 72% of them crowd-sourced from citizen scientists (non-researchers) from across moun...
Article
Full-text available
Non-lethal mitigation of crop use by elephants Loxodonta africana is an increasingly important part of protected area management across Africa and Asia. Recently, beehive fences have been suggested as a potential mitigation strategy. We tested the effectiveness of this method in a farming community adjacent to Udzungwa Mountains National Park in so...
Article
Full-text available
The world's biodiversity is shared by countries that are increasingly recognizing the need for effective responses to human influence and climate change impacts through coordinated management and protection of nature beyond national borders. The case of elephants, a highly mobile and widely distributed mammal that plays crucial ecological and econo...
Article
Full-text available
Wild species use habitats that vary in risk across space and time. This risk can derive from natural predators and also from direct and indirect human pressures. A starving forager will often take risks that a less hungry forager would not. At a highly seasonal and human-modified site, we predicted that arboreal samango monkeys (Cercopithecus albog...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how threatened species adapt their behavior to landscapes shaped by humans is increasingly important to ensuring they persist in a changing world. Matrix habitats can be shared spaces where human and nonhuman primates coexist. We set out to determine how an endemic, threatened forest specialist, the frugivorous, arboreal samango monke...
Article
Full-text available
Crop losses from elephants are one of the primary obstacles to the coexistence of elephants and people and one of the contributing causes to elephant population decline. Understanding if some individuals in an elephant population are more likely to forage on crops, and the temporal patterns of elephant visits to farms, is key to mitigating the nega...
Chapter
A fundamental step in the management and conservation of wild species is advancing our understanding of how animals perceive and use their habitat. Spatial variation in risk either from natural predation or human disturbance generates a “landscape of fear” that can be measured and assessed using experimental patch approaches such as giving-up densi...
Article
Live-capture of animals is a widely used technique in ecological research, and previously trapped individuals often respond to traps with either attraction or avoidance. The effects of trapping on animals’ risk perception are not often studied, although nonlethal effects of risk can significantly influence animals’ behavior and distribution. We use...
Article
Dyadic social relations are known to exhibit homophily − attraction and bonding between similar individuals − and recent studies have detected homophily also on the social network level. Here, we investigate whether social media networks exhibit signs of homophily with regards to life stages. Using a large and global database (N = 111,863) of socia...
Article
https://theamericanscholar.org/south-africa-rhinos-under-the-gun/
Data
These giving-up density experiments were run between May and August 2013 (Lajuma) and May and July 2014 (Hogsback).
Chapter
Roads in East Africa present unique challenges to wildlife conservation because reserves are largely unfenced and biodiversity is high. Few roads in the region carry high-speed, high-volume traffic, but this is changing rapidly. This chapter reviews existing research on the impact of roads on East African wildlife, research needs and mitigation str...
Article
Full-text available
Humans and human infrastructure are known to alter the relationship between predators and prey, typically by directly or indirectly shielding one of the species from the other. In addition to these overt changes to animals’ behavior, observers may have more subtle impacts on animals’ foraging decisions. However, the anthropogenic alteration of risk...
Article
Full-text available
We censused two discrete subpopulations of the endangered Zanzibar red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) and sympatric Sykes's monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis albogularis) between February 2004 and September 2005 in two coastal forests in Zanzibar, including the northernmost (Kiwengwa-Pongwe Forest) and some of the southernmost (Uzi and Vundwe Islands) exte...
Article
Full-text available
Background Early and accurate diagnosis of febrile patients is essential to treat uncomplicated malaria cases properly, prevent severe malaria, and avert unnecessary anti-malarial treatments. Improper use of anti-malarials increases the risk of adverse drug reaction and the evolution of drug/parasite resistance. While microscopy is the most common...
Article
Full-text available
http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/1800368/elephants_are_not_diamonds.html
Article
Full-text available
Priority Primate Areas are identified in Tanzania, mainland Africa's most important country for conservation of primates, on the basis of occupancy by globally rare, Red-Listed and range-restricted primate species and subspecies. We provide a comprehensive list and regional assessment of Tanzania's primate taxa, using IUCN Red List criteria, as wel...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Executive Summary Ruvu South is one of the most important coastal forests in Tanzania. It is a large forest (320km2) relative to other coastal forest fragments in Tanzania (most of which measure less than 20km2). It lies 45km west of Dar es Salaam and is therefore under constant pressure from the illegal production of charcoal to supply the city’s...
Chapter
Full-text available
An increasing number of field studies on behavioral adaptations and learning suggest that a capacity for flexibility in local responses to disturbance could buffer some so-called specialists against that disturbance. We discuss how specialization, rather than an intrinsic species trait, appears to be moderated by flexible and learned behavior and m...
Chapter
The increasing size of the human ecological footprint will require a matching increase in conservation efforts if significant, viable communities of nonvoting species are to have any real chance of persisting in natural forms where they can evolve and provide vital services to the human economy, health, and wellbeing. Conservation biology, one of t...
Article
Full-text available
SHOULD CONSERVATION TARGETS, such as the proportion of a region to be placed in protected areas, be socially acceptable from the start? Or should they be based unapologetically on the best available science and expert opinion, then address issues of practicality later? Such questions strike to the philosophical core of conservation. Ambitious targe...
Article
Full-text available
Swamp forests may be important refuges for primates and felids where these taxa are threatened with habitat loss. Mangrove and peat swamp forests, impenetrable, wet habitats, inaccessible and uninhabitable for humans, may, in some regions, be the most significant remaining habitats for threatened species. They are nevertheless neglected in field st...
Article
Full-text available
Cycads and colobus monkeys occur together in many parts of tropical Africa; we present the first records of colobus feeding on these plants. On 22 occasions, the Endangered Zanzibar red colobus Procolobus kirkii fed on the leaves of Encephalartos hildebrandtii, a Near Threatened species, in the Kiwengwa-Pongwe Forest Reserve, north-eastern Unguja....
Article
Full-text available
More than half of the global population of the endangered Zanzibar red colobus (Procolobus kirkii) live outside the single major protected area on Zanzibar Island. We present data on the 2 largest, discrete subpopulations living in unprotected areas at extremes of the species’ range. We compare the size and structure of 11 groups, specifically 6 co...
Article
Full-text available
Walker and Stiles argue that elephant populations are not declining. The facts say otherwise. Loxodonta africana numbers have plummeted by more than 50% continent-wide in the past 40 years, a reduction now compounded by increases in range loss, conflict with humans, and resurgence in poaching ([ 1
Article
Full-text available
Tanzania and Zambia are petitioning the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to “downlist” the conservation status of their elephants to allow sale of stockpiled ivory. But just 2 years after CITES placed a 9-year moratorium on future ivory sales (1), elephant poaching is on the rise. The petitioning countries are major s...
Article
Full-text available
Savannah elephants make extensive use of montane forest in three Tanzanian massifs, including the highly biodiverse Udzungwa Mountains. We have begun the first study of the Udzungwa elephant population, which is perceived to be increasing and is compressed due to loss of connectivity with adjacent protected areas. Meanwhile, human-elephant conflict...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the role of geographical insularity in divergence and speciation of Procolobus kirkii by examining cranial morphology. The sample (n = 369) included museum specimens of Procolobus spp. and recently deceased individuals of P. kirkii from the main island of Zanzibar and 2 smaller islands in the archipelago. Geometric morphometrics evi...
Article
Full-text available
Isolated populations of Procolobus kirkii on Uzi Island, Zanzibar, use Rhizophora mucronata-dominated mangrove forest for refuge. Three groups, observed over 14 months, spent up to 85% of total observation time in mangroves with brief excursions to adjacent upland coral rag forest, habitat degraded by human cutting. A large proportion of monkeys' d...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Drawing on citizen science and a growing crowd-sourced photographic dataset, our team is examining the relationship between winter coat shedding in the iconic mountain goat, and the impact of climate change on temperature regimes across their range. Our objective is to understand if the timing of their winter coat molt is shifting to earlier in the year. We are also examining molt timing in relation to extrinsic variables including elevation, latitude, and vegetation green-up and intrinsic including goat sex and reproductive status. If mountain goats cannot keep pace with warming through earlier shedding, then we need to understand what behavioral options for adapting to increasing temperatures they might have to better provide for their needs.