Katarzyna Jankowiak

Katarzyna Jankowiak
Adam Mickiewicz University | UAM · Department of Psycholinguistic Studies

PhD in English Linguistics

About

22
Publications
3,780
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
101
Citations
Introduction
In my research, I investigate behavioral and psychophysiological (EEG and SC) correlates of bilingual language processing. In particular, I am interested in stereotype processing in the native and non-native language. I also aim to provide insights into brain correlates of creative meaning construction in L1 and L2. Additionally, my research is devoted to examining the interplay between language, emotions, and semantic processing in the bilingual context.
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - present
Adam Mickiewicz University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
June 2018 - present
Adam Mickiewicz University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
October 2014 - June 2018
Adam Mickiewicz University
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
October 2014 - June 2018
Adam Mickiewicz University
Field of study
  • English Linguistics
October 2012 - June 2014
Adam Mickiewicz University
Field of study
  • English Studies: Cognitive Applied Linguistics
October 2009 - June 2012
Adam Mickiewicz University
Field of study
  • English Studies

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
Though previous research has shown a decreased sensitivity to emotionally-laden linguistic stimuli presented in the non-native (L2) compared to the native language (L1), studies conducted thus far have not examined how different modalities influence bilingual emotional language processing. The present experiment was therefore aimed at investigating...
Article
Full-text available
Aims and objectives The study provides new insights into how bilingual speakers process semantically complex novel meanings in their native (L1) and non-native language (L2). Methodology The study employs an EEG method with a semantic decision task to novel nominal metaphors, novel similes, as well as literal and anomalous sentences presented in p...
Article
While novel and conventional metaphor comprehension has received much attention in the monolingual context, thus far little electrophysiological research has been conducted with a view to examining how bilingual speakers process metaphors in their non-native language (L2) as well as how L2 proficiency level might modulate such processes. The presen...
Article
Full-text available
Positive and negative moods tend to have differential effects on lexico-semantic processing in the native language (L1). Though accumulating evidence points to dampened sensitivity to affective stimuli in the non-native language (L2), little is known about the effects of positive and negative moods on L2 processing. Here, we show that lexico-semant...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, much psycholinguistic research has been devoted to examining cognitive mechanisms engaged in language processing in the bilingual context, as this might provide in-depth insights into how different languages interact with one another as well as how and to what extent language competence affects cognition. At the same time, along with such...
Poster
Full-text available
Previous electrophysiological (EEG) research has shown that positive and negative moods (i.e., affective background states of low intensity) may differently modulate semantic processes in the native language (L1) (Chwilla et al., 2011). Accumulating evidence from bilingual speakers, however, has only pointed to dampened sensitivity to affective sti...
Poster
Full-text available
Previous monolingual event-related potential (ERP) studies have often suggested that positive and negative moods differently modulate lexico-semantic processes. However, little is known about how mood influences creative meaning construction, as reflected in novel metaphoric meaning comprehension, and how this effect is modulated by the native (L1)...
Article
Full-text available
Aims and objectives: We aimed to explore the relationship between mood and emotional word processing in the bilingual context, as modulated by participants’ gender. Methodology: We presented mood-inducing film clips to 28 female and 28 male unbalanced Polish–English bilinguals to put them in positive and negative moods. Participants were asked to...
Article
Full-text available
Previous translation process research has pointed to an increased cognitive load when translating metaphoric compared to literal language. Yet, studies conducted thus far have not examined the role of translation direction (i.e., L1-L2 vs. L2-L1) in novel metaphor translation and have not tested whether and how this process might be modulated by th...
Article
This guide accompanies the following article: Jankowiak, K. Current trends in electrophysiological research on bilingual language processing. Language and Linguistics Compass. DOI: 10.1111/lnc3.12436. The teaching and learning guide, by presenting ideas on how to apply the electrophysiological insights into bilingualism in classroom contexts, exte...
Article
Full-text available
The main aim of the study is to investigate the process of interpreting emotionally-laden content in the two directions (i.e., L2>L1 vs. L1>L2). In line with previous research on bilingual-ism, there is a psychological distance when processing the non-native relative to the native tongue, reflecting a decreased sensitivity to affect-laden stimuli i...
Article
Full-text available
Prior irony research has primarily explored how people comprehend written irony in their first language (L1). Nowadays, however, people often communicate in their second (L2) language, and additionally, irony may be communicated multimodally, i.e., in the textual (reading), auditory (listening), or audiovisual (watching) modality. Hence, communicat...
Article
Full-text available
The two studies reported in the article provide normative measures for 120 novel nominal metaphors, 120 novel similes, 120 literal sentences, and 120 anomalous utterances in Polish (Study 1) and in English (Study 2). The presented set is ideally suited to addressing methodological requirements in research on metaphor processing. The critical (sente...
Book
This book is aimed to show how late proficient unbalanced Polish (L1) – English (L2) bilingual speakers process novel and conventional metaphors in their L1 and L2. To this end, behavioral and event-related potential data were collected from participants, who performed a binary semantic decision task for the presented utterances. Behavioral as well...
Chapter
In order to investigate how language is processed in the human mind, psycho-linguists usually employ quantitative research techniques, which provide empirical evidence to a phenomenon under investigation. Although there is a number of such research techniques, each of them has certain limitations. Therefore, mechanisms engaged in language processin...
Chapter
It is assumed that figurative language reflects the poetics of mind (Gibbs 1994a), and thus nonliteral utterances might be used as a tool to examine human creativity by showing how the brain constructs new meanings. This chapter is devoted to discussing mechanisms engaged in metaphor comprehension, as the experiment reported in this book aimed at e...
Chapter
Over the recent decades, bilingual language processing has become one of the most widely investigated issues in psycholinguistics. Much attention has been devoted to providing theoretical frameworks and computational models that explicate how bilingual speakers process and comprehend their native (L1) and non-native tongue (L2), and propose factors...
Article
Full-text available
Investigating human emotions empirically is still considered to be challenging, mostly due to the questionable validity of the results obtained when employing individual types of measures. Among the most frequently used methods to study emotional reactions are self-report, autonomic, neurophysiological, and behavioral measures. Importantly, previou...
Article
Full-text available
Event related potentials (ERPs) have frequently been employed to investigate language comprehension. One of the best researched language-related ERP components is the N400, which is sensitive to various linguistic factors (e.g. plausibility, word frequency, predictability, word-level associations), and is therefore commonly referred to as an index...
Article
Full-text available
Though metaphoric language comprehension has previously been investigated with event-related potentials, little attention has been devoted to extending this research from the monolingual to the bilingual context. In the current study, late proficient unbalanced Polish (L1)–English (L2) bilinguals performed a semantic decision task to novel metaphor...
Poster
Full-text available
poster presented at XIII International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, Braga, 2017

Projects

Projects (8)
Project
In this project, we aim to broaden the scientific knowledge about 1) the role of emotion in speech production, 2) the underlying brain mechanisms involved in emotional word and sentence production, and 3) the modulation of these processes by the first and second language. To achieve this, we investigate the physiology and brain dynamics of emotional speech production in the first and second language of Polish (L1) – English (L2) bilinguals. We also analyze how bilinguals physiologically prepare for producing emotional speech (emotional anticipation), and how it may be modulated by the emotional and linguistic context.
Project
The present research project will examine brain mechanisms engaged in stereotype processing, as modulated by language of operation (i.e., native vs. non-native language), level of linguistic processing (i.e., single word vs. sentence processing), and its automaticity (i.e., below vs. above the conscious perception threshold). As a result, we aim to show whether and to what extent Polish (L1) – English (L2) bilinguals are less sensitive to stereotypical language when operating in their L1 and L2. The use of the EEG method will allow us to provide valuable and direct insights into the neurophysiology of stereotype processing in bilingualism. This project is funded by the National Science Centre, Poland (OPUS, no. 2021/41/B/HS2/00249).
Project
The present research project aims to investigate neurophysiological correlates of novel metaphor (i.e., complex meaning) comprehension and positive and negative moods. In this electrophysiological (EEG) study, proficient unbalanced Polish–English bilinguals will judge the meaningfulness of novel metaphors and literal and anomalous sentence in-between watching mood-inducing either positive or negative film fragments while their brain activity will be measured. The results of the study are expected to provide insights into how bilinguals process complex meaning when experiencing strong mood states, which carries potential implications for bilingual therapy. The project has been funded under the Excellence Initiative – Research University project, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (017/02/SNJL/0001).