Katalin Szlávecz

Katalin Szlávecz
Johns Hopkins University | JHU · Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

PhD

About

147
Publications
64,393
Reads
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3,698
Citations
Citations since 2017
44 Research Items
2262 Citations
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Introduction
1) From Soil to Society. Led by WSU, the goal is to understand the role of environment, soil, cropping system, and economics on the nutritional content of crop species. 2) Earthworm assemblages in various ecosystems: how non-native species affect surface soil properties. 3) Urban vacant lots: how variability of soil properties might be related to demolition and green space establishment protocols. 4) Ecosystem services in urban greenspaces: comparison of parks in Lahti, Baltimore and Singapore.
Additional affiliations
November 2008 - present
Smithsonian Institution
Position
  • Research Associate
January 2008 - present
Johns Hopkins University
Position
  • Professor
January 2006 - present
Eötvös Loránd University

Publications

Publications (147)
Article
Earthworms are generally categorized into three ecological groups. This categorization and its two refined versions have been widely used in studies focusing on earthworm community structure and biological invasions, as well as the effects of earthworms on vegetation, soil properties, carbon and nitrogen cycling, and ecosystem functions. We revisit...
Article
Full-text available
Acute resource pulses can have dramatic legacies on organismal growth, but the legacy effects of resource pulses on broader aspects of community structure and ecosystem processes are less understood. Mass emergence of periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) provides an excellent opportunity to shed light on the influence of resource pulses on communit...
Article
Full-text available
The 11 th International Symposium on Terrestrial Isopod Biology and this special issue of ZooKeys is dedicated to the memory of our colleague, Dr. Jonathan C. Wright, who passed away on December 16, 2019. Jonathan was a scientist, educator, musician, public servant, husband and father.
Article
Full-text available
Cycling of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and sulfur (S) is an important ecosystem service that forest soils provide. Humans influence these biogeochemical processes through the deposition of atmospheric pollutants and site disturbances. One way to study these potential anthropogenic trajectories is through long-term monito...
Article
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The invasion of jumping worms, a small group of pheretimoid earthworm species from Asia, has increasingly become an ecological, environmental and conservation issue in forest ecosystems and urban-suburban landscapes around the world. Their presence is often noticed due to their high abundance, distinctive “jumping” behavior, and prominent granular...
Article
Wood decomposition is regulated by microbial community and soil conditions and plays an important role in global carbon cycling. Among many factors, local conditions, associated with forest age and the leaf litter adjacent to decaying wood may directly and indirectly influence microbial colonization and rate of decay. In this study, wood sticks wit...
Article
Full-text available
Macrodecomposers provide important ecosystem services even in human dominated habitats including urbanecosystems, but the effect of urban land conversion on their species diversity and abundance has not been ex-plored at global scale. Here, we present thefirst meta-analysis to quantify the general response of two major ar-thropod taxa, terrestrial...
Article
Full-text available
Litter decomposition is a key process for carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and is mainly controlled by environmental conditions, substrate quantity, and quality as well as microbial community abundance and composition. In particular, the effects of climate and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on litter decomposition and its...
Article
An increasingly urbanised world is one of the most prominent examples of global environmental change. Across the globe, urban parks are designed and managed in a similar way, resulting in visually pleasing expansions of lawn interspersed with individually-planted trees of varying appearances and functional traits. These large urban greenspaces have...
Article
Full-text available
Earthworms are an important soil taxon as ecosystem engineers, providing a variety of crucial ecosystem functions and services. Little is known about their diversity and distribution at large spatial scales, despite the availability of considerable amounts of local-scale data. Earthworm diversity data, obtained from the primary literature or provid...
Article
Full-text available
Earthworms are an important soil taxon as ecosystem engineers, providing a variety of crucial ecosystem functions and services. Little is known about their diversity and distribution at large spatial scales, despite the availability of considerable amounts of local-scale data. Earthworm diversity data, obtained from the primary literature or provid...
Preprint
Full-text available
We discuss the history and lessons learned from a series of deployments of environmental sensors measuring soil parameters and CO2 fluxes over the last fifteen years, in an outdoor environment. We present the hardware and software architecture of our current Gen-3 system, and then discuss how we are simplifying the user facing part of the software,...
Chapter
Full-text available
The global population is expected to exceed 11 billion before the end of the twenty-first century (United Nations 2015). Populations within urban areas are also increasing, with the number of mega-sized (ten million people or more) cities expected to increase from 10 in 1990 to 41 in 2030 (United Nations 2015). In the United States, the human popul...
Article
Full-text available
Peregrine pheretimoid earthworms, commonly known as jumping worms, are members of the family Megascolecidae that have become widely established outside of their native ranges. In many parts of the world this represents a second wave of earthworm invasions, following the introduction of peregrine European earthworms in the family Lumbricidae during...
Article
Urbanization fundamentally alters soil physiochemical properties, but little is known on how this human effect alters soil biota. Microarthropods are important bioindicators due to their sedentary life form and sensitivity to environmental changes. Taxonomic richness, abundance, diversity, distribution of microarthropod communities were investigate...
Article
Full-text available
The Earth's population will become more than 80% urban during this century. This threshold is often regarded as sufficient justification for pursuing urban ecology. However, pursuit has primarily focused on building empirical richness, and urban ecology theory is rarely discussed. The Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) has been grounded in theory sinc...
Article
Full-text available
During litter decomposition, three major fates of litter carbon (C) are possible: emission as carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere, leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and translocation and transformation into soil organic carbon (SOC). Soil moisture, one of the key drivers of litter decomposition, is predicted to change in the future d...
Article
Full-text available
In urban landscapes, humans are the most significant factor determining belowground diversity, including earthworms. Within the framework of the Global Urban Soil Ecology and Education Network (GLUSEEN), a multi-city comparison was carried out to assess the effects of soil disturbance on earthworms. In each of five cities (Baltimore, USA; Budapest,...
Article
The mechanisms underlying the bioaccumulation and detoxification of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) by terrestrial invertebrates are poorly understood. We used uniformly ring-14C-labelled TBBPA to investigate the bioaccumulation kinetics, metabolites distribution, and subsequent detoxification strategy of TBBPA in the geophagous earthworm Metaphire g...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization results in the systemic conversion of land-use, driving habitat and biodiversity loss. The “urban convergence hypothesis” posits that urbanization represents a merging of habitat characteristics, in turn driving physiological and functional responses within the biotic community. To test this hypothesis, we sampled five cities (Baltimor...
Article
A previous 5-year long field litter manipulation study at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in coastal Maryland demonstrated that forest age controls the chemical trajectory of litter decay and the extent and source of litter incorporation into soil physical fractions among young (60–74 yrs) and old (113–132 yrs) successional sta...
Article
Full-text available
In an increasingly urbanized world scientific research has shifted towards the understanding of cities as unique ecosystems. Urban land use change results in rapid and drastic changes in physical and biological properties, including that of biodiversity and community composition. Soil biodiversity research often lags behind the more charismatic gro...
Data
List of terrestrial isopod species records in urban areas
Article
Full-text available
In temperate deciduous forests of eastern USA, most earthworm communities are dominated by invasive species. Their structure and functional group composition have critical impacts on ecological properties and processes. However, the factors determining their community structure are still poorly understood, and little is known regarding their dynami...
Article
Full-text available
Through litter decomposition enormous amounts of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to understand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litt...
Article
Full-text available
Earthworm invasions are one of the most serious causes of ecological deterioration in the temperate deciduous forests of North America. Non-native earthworms impact understory vegetation, leaf litter layer, carbon dynamics, nutrient availability, and the associated food webs. Here we report a significant status change and confirm expansion of known...
Article
Full-text available
Forests are major sources of terrestrial CH4 and CO2 fluxes but not all surfaces within forests have been measured and accounted for. Stem respiration is a well-known source of CO2, but more recently tree stems have been shown to be sources of CH4 in wetlands and upland habitats. A study transect was established along a natural moisture gradient, w...
Article
Full-text available
Through litter decomposition enormous amount of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to understand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litte...
Article
Full-text available
Through litter decomposition enormous amounts of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to under-stand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litt...
Article
Earthworm species with different feeding, burrowing, and/or casting behaviors can lead to distinct microbial communities through complex direct and indirect processes. European earthworm invasion into temperate deciduous forests in North America has been shown to alter microbial biomass in the soil and reduce the fungi-to-bacteria ratios. It is unc...
Article
Full-text available
The family Lumbricidae is arguably the most well-known and well-studied earthworm group due to its dominance in the European earthworm fauna and its invasion in temperate regions worldwide. However, its North American members, especially the genus Bimastos Moore, 1893, are poorly understood. We revised the systematics of the genus Bimastos and test...
Data
Primers used in polymerase chain reactions (PCR). (DOCX)
Data
Species from Domínguez et al. (2015) and Pérez-Losada et al. (2015) used in this study and their GenBank accession numbers or voucher numbers. (DOCX)
Article
Urbanization alters the physicochemical environment, introduces non-native species and causes ecosystem characteristics to converge. It has been speculated that these alterations contribute to loss of regional and global biodiversity, but so far most urban studies have assessed macro-organisms and reported mixed evidence for biodiversity loss. We s...
Article
In an effort to study urban soil ecological systems, we have recently piloted the Global Urban Soil Ecology and Education Network (GLUSEEN). When fully implemented, GLUSEEN will be a distributed network that builds upon a worldwide set of decomposition experiments using nylon-mesh teabags sited in various urban soil habitat types.As an open and dis...
Article
Full-text available
The invasion of the pheretimoid earthworms in North America, especially the genera Amynthas and Metaphire, has raised increasing concerns among ecologists and land managers, in turn increasing the need for proper identification. However, the commonly used keys to this group are more than 30 years old with outdated taxonomic information and are base...
Article
Soil microarthropods as organic matter decomposers play an important role in soil functioning thus providing ecosystem services. However, ecosystem scale investigations on their abundance and dynamics are scarce because their high spatio-temporal heterogeneity requires huge sample size. Processing and identifying large number of individuals is extr...
Article
Soil respiration is frequently measured as a surrogate for biological activities and is important in soil carbon cycling. The heterotrophic component of soil respiration is primarily driven by microbial decomposition of leaf litter and soil organic matter, and is partially controlled by resource availability. In North American temperate deciduous f...
Article
The conversion of agriculture lands to forest has been occurring in parts of North America for decades. The legacy of management activity during this transition is reflected in soil physical and chemical properties years after abandonment. This study was conducted at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Maryland, USA, to determine land-us...
Article
A mounting body of research suggests that invasive non-native earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about: (1) the mechanisms behind earthw...
Article
Full-text available
Prof. Dr. András Zicsi, the renowned soil biologist and earthworm taxonomist passed away on 22 July, 2015 at the age of 87. To honour his enormous contribution in exploring earthworm biodiversity all over the world, we provide a brief, albeit subjective overview of the history of earthworm taxonomy in the last two century.
Article
A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthwor...
Article
As part of the Global Urban Soil Ecology and Education Network and to test the urban ecosystem convergence hypothesis, we report on soil pH, organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) measured in four soil habitat types (turfgrass, ruderal, remnant, and reference) in five metropolitan areas (Baltimore, Budapest, Hel...
Article
Substrates with a unique stable isotope signature provide researchers with the ability to trace nutrients through food webs. Plant material labeled with carbon (13C) can be produced by exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) with an isotopic composition that differs from ambient conditions during photosynthesis. Labeling can occur continuously or be repea...
Article
The factors regulating soil animal communities are poorly understood. Current theory favors niche complementarity and facilitation over competition as the primary forms of non- trophic interspecific interaction in soil fauna; however, competition has frequently been suggested as an important community- structuring factor in earthworms, ecosystem en...
Article
Full-text available
Introduced species dominate the terrestrial isopod fauna in most inland habitats of North America, including urban landscapes. These non-native species are often very abundant and thus potentially play a significant role in detritus processing. We monitored isopod assemblages in an urban forest for a year to examine the relationship between surface...
Article
Community assembly and the resulting community structure reflect both local and regional processes. The relative importance, however, of each of these scales in most restoration contexts is unknown. Urban stream restoration, which often involves complete remodeling and replanting of the riparian zone, presents an opportunity to investigate the infl...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this work was to analyze the vegetation dynamics of a xeric serpentine savanna located in the Mid-Atlantic, USA. We employed vegetation surveys of thirty-two, 10 x 15 m quadrats to obtain woody species composition, density, basal area, and developed a spatial physiochemical dataset of substrate geochemistry to independently summari...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial heterogeneity of soil conditions combined with intraspecific variation confer site-specific edaphic tolerance, resulting in local adaptation and speciation. To understand the geoecological processes controlling community assembly of woodland tree species on serpentine and mafic soils, we investigated resource gradients and provenance (geogr...
Article
Full-text available
Increased urban development, including an increase in impervious surfaces has the potential to alter the biogeochemistry of surface systems due to storm water runoff contaminated with potentially toxic trace metals (e.g. Zn, Cu and Pb). A major source for urban metals is dust that accumulates on roadways. This roadway dust is derived from vehicle w...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Most work on methane (CH4) emissions from natural ecosystems has focused on wetlands and wetland soils because they are predictable emitters and relatively simple to quantify. Less attention has been directed toward upland ecosystems that cover far larger areas, but are assumed to be too dry to emit CH4. There is abund...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Citizen science represents an exciting opportunity to reconnect people with the ecosystems they inhabit and to learn about the services ecosystems provide. In an effort to both engage citizen scientists and to study urban soil ecological systems, we have recently initiated a Global Urban Soil Ecological Education Netwo...