Kassandra L Ford

Kassandra L Ford
George Washington University | GW · Department of Biological Sciences

Environmental and Evolutionary Biology PhD

About

7
Publications
1,153
Reads
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21
Citations
Introduction
I am an NSF postdoctoral research fellow at George Washington University. My research analyzes morphological patterns of evolution in two independent groups of electric fishes: Apteronotidae (South America) and Mormyridae (Africa). I use open-source software to examine 3D models of craniofacial shape and geometric morphometrics to quantify differences between groups and among species.
Additional affiliations
September 2021 - May 2022
Universität Bern
Position
  • Early Postdoctoral Researcher
August 2016 - May 2021
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2015 - August 2016
Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2016 - May 2021
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Field of study
  • Environmental and Evolutionary Biology
September 2011 - May 2015
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Genetics

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
Apteronotidae and Mormyridae are species-rich clades of weakly electric fishes from Neotropical and Afrotropical freshwaters, respectively, known for their high morphological disparity and often regarded as a classic example of convergent evolution. Here we use CT-imaging and 3D geometric morphometrics to quantify disparity in craniofacial morpholo...
Article
Full-text available
Synopsis Evolutionary transitions across abiotic gradients can occur among habitats at multiple spatial scales, and among taxa and biotas through a range of ecological and evolutionary time frames. Two diverse groups of electric fishes, Neotropical Gymnotiformes, and Afrotropical Mormyroidea, offer interesting examples of potentially convergent evo...
Article
A new species of killifish, Epiplatys cashneri, is described from tributaries of the Geebo and Dugbe rivers, in southern Liberia. It differs from all other Epiplatys species in its distinctive coloration. Males have an orange body with red spots and reddish orange median fins with dark red spots and dark red margins. Females are yellow with red spo...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of sexually dimorphic traits is thought to have marked effects on underlying patterns of static allometry. These traits can negatively affect organismal survivability by creating trade-offs between trait size and performance. Here we use three-dimensional geometric morphometrics to study the static allometry of two species of sexually...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of sexually dimorphic traits is thought to have marked effects on underlying patterns of static allom-etry. These traits can negatively affect organismal survivability by creating trade-offs between trait size and performance. Here we use three-dimensional geometric morphometrics to study the static allometry of two species of sexuall...
Preprint
Full-text available
The evolution of sexual weaponry is thought to have marked effects on the underlying static allometry that builds them. These weapons can negatively affect organismal survivability by creating trade-offs between trait size and performance. Here we use three-dimensional geometric morphometrics to study the static allometry of two species of sexually...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Quantify morphological characteristics of two families of electric fishes (Apteronotidae and Mormyridae) to investigate adaptations and evolutionary trends.