Karri Neldner

Karri Neldner
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology | EVA

Doctor of Psychology
Postdoc @ Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

About

16
Publications
2,400
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132
Citations
Introduction
My research interests lie within the fields of developmental, cross-cultural and comparative psychology. I am interested in understanding how children learn to solve problems by using tools, innovating new solutions, and learning from others. I examine how problem solving strategies vary across diverse cultural settings, to identify the social mechanisms that shape our early cognitive development. I also examine children's early attitudes towards animals and other entities.

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, the metacognitive abilities of nonhuman primates and the developmental emergence of metacognition in children have become topics of increasing research interest. In the current study, the performance of three adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes; Experiment 1) and forty-four 3.5- and 5.5-year-old human children (Experiment 2) wa...
Article
Full-text available
Preferences for pink and blue were tested in children aged 4–11 years in three small‐scale societies: Shipibo villages in the Peruvian Amazon, kastom villages in the highlands of Tanna Island, Vanuatu, and BaYaka foragers in the northern Republic of Congo; and compared to children from an Australian global city (total N = 232). No sex differences w...
Article
Full-text available
Through the mechanisms of observation, imitation and teaching, young children readily pick up the tool using behaviours of their culture. However, little is known about the baseline abilities of children's tool use: what they might be capable of inventing on their own in the absence of socially provided information. It has been shown that children...
Article
Full-text available
Prior research suggests that human children lack an aptitude for tool innovation. However, children’s tool making must be explored across a broader range of tasks and across diverse cultural contexts before we can conclude that they are genuinely poor tool innovators. To this end, we investigated children’s ability to independently construct 3 new...
Article
Full-text available
Prominent theorists have made the argument that modern humans express moral concern for a greater number of entities than at any other time in our past. Moreover, adults show stable patterns in the degrees of concern they afford certain entities over others, yet it remains unknown when and how these patterns of moral decision-making manifest in dev...
Data
Comparison of all possible models including main effects only (post hoc binomial analysis). (DOCX)
Data
Age slopes for all twenty four entities. (DOCX)
Data
Supporting information. (DOCX)
Data
Comparison of all possible models including main effects only (cumulative logistic analysis). (DOCX)
Data
Comparison of previously selected model and new models including interactions (cumulative logistic analysis). (DOCX)
Data
Comparison of previously selected model and new models including interactions (post hoc binomial analysis). (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
This study examined future‐oriented behavior in children (3–6 years; N = 193) from three diverse societies—one industrialized Western city and two small, geographically isolated communities. Children had the opportunity to prepare for two alternative versions of an immediate future event over six trials. Some 3‐year‐olds from all cultures demonstra...
Article
Young children typically demonstrate low rates of tool innovation. However, previous studies have limited children’s performance by presenting tools with opaque affordances. In an attempt to scaffold children’s understanding of what constitutes an appropriate tool within an innovation task we compared tools in which the focal affordance was visible...
Poster
Full-text available
Conference poster for SRCD 2017 on children’s tool innovation across culture
Article
Full-text available
Through the mechanisms of observation, imitation and teaching, young children readily pick up the tool using behaviours of their culture. However, little is known about the baseline abilities of children's tool use: what they might be capable of inventing on their own in the absence of socially provided information. It has been shown that children...

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