Karleen D. Gribble

Karleen D. Gribble
Western Sydney University · School of Nursing and Midwifery

Doctor of Philosophy, Bachelor of Rural Science (Honours)

About

63
Publications
28,293
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1,162
Citations

Publications

Publications (63)
Article
Full-text available
Early initiation of breastfeeding, within 1 h of birth, is vital for the health of newborns and reduces morbidity and mortality. Secondary analysis of the 2016 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) showed that early initiation of breastfeeding significantly reduced the risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children under 2 years. Early i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Early initiation of breastfeeding, within one hour of birth, is vital for the health of newborns, and reduces morbidity and mortality. Secondary analysis of the 2016 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) showed that early initiation of breastfeeding significantly reduced the risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children under two years....
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Recommendations for the clinical management of new mothers with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 and their infants are required. Guidance must weigh the risk posed by transmission of SARS-CoV-2 against the protection that maternal proximity and breastfeeding provide infants. Our aim was to review international COVID-19 guidance for mate...
Article
Full-text available
Background: In an effort to prevent infants being infected with SARS-CoV-2, some governments, professional organisations, and health facilities are instituting policies that isolate newborns from their mothers and otherwise prevent or impede breastfeeding. Weighing of risks is necessary in policy development: Such policies are risky as was show...
Preprint
Full-text available
Concerns of mothers seeking breastfeeding support during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the experiences of Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA) volunteers who assisted them, were explored via an online survey. Surveys were completed 16th March to 18th of May 2020 and described the COVID-19 related concerns of 340 individuals. One hundred and thir...
Article
Full-text available
The World Health Organisation (WHO) has provided detailed guidance on the care of infants of women who are a person under investigation (PUI) or confirmed to have COVID‐19, which supports immediate postpartum mother‐infant contact and breastfeeding with appropriate respiratory precautions. Although many countries have followed WHO guidance, others...
Article
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Background: Australia experiences a high incidence of natural emergencies and Australian governments have committed significant investment into emergency preparedness and response. Amongst the population groups most vulnerable to emergencies are infants and young children with their vulnerability centering around their specific food and fluid need...
Article
Research about lactation and breastfeeding has exploded since the Journal of Human Lactation ( JHL) began publishing in 1985. To discuss the 3-decade-long role of the Journal in promoting, supporting, and disseminating lactation research, editors convened a multidisciplinary group of lactation researchers and providers which comprised three senior...
Article
If mothers are imprisoned, mother-baby units, where women keep their babies with them, should be routinely available, including to those on remand. Crucially, programs in mother-baby units should involve intensive parenting support, including for breastfeeding.
Article
Breastfeeding is critical for the healthy growth and development of infants. A diverse range of infant-feeding methods are used around the world today. Many methods involve feeding infants with expressed human milk obtained through human milk exchange. Human milk exchange includes human milk banking, human milk sharing, and markets in which human m...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Decisions about infant feeding are embedded and are continuously made within a woman's social and cultural context. Despite the benefits of breastfeeding to both women and infants, and government policies and laws to protect and promote breastfeeding, breastfeeding in public remains a controversial issue. The purpose of this paper is t...
Article
Infants and young children are vulnerable in emergencies. The Operational Guidance on Infant and Young Child Feeding in Emergencies (OG-IFE) provides direction to governments, aid organisations and individuals on how to support the wellbeing of this population. The importance of breastfeeding in promoting child survival in emergencies cannot be ove...
Article
Internet‐facilitated peer‐to‐peer milk sharing enables the giving and receiving of human milk between individuals previously unknown to one another. However, the process of milk sharing allows for milk sharing partners to develop relationships with one another. The development of relationships between 41 milk recipients and 97 milk donors in Intern...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The purpose of this review is to provide evidence that indicates the effectiveness of key strategies for an enduring Australian National Breastfeeding Strategy (ANBS-E). This is undertaken through a review of academic and grey literature during a period of 10 years (2007–2017). The global public health recommendation of the World Health Organizatio...
Chapter
In emergencies, women and children are among the most vulnerable to multiple forms of violence and exploitation as well as illness and death. Displacement during humanitarian crises has a profound impact on maternal and child health, particularly during the perinatal period, with significant consequences for maternal and infant health across the li...
Article
A cross-sectional examination of the accuracy of volume markers on infant feeding bottles available for sale in Australia between December 2013 and February 2014 was carried out. Ninety-one bottles representing 28 different brands were examined. Eighty-eight bottles were hard sided. Volumes in these bottles were marked in a combination of millilite...
Article
The use of health and nutrition content claims in infant formula advertising is restricted by many governments in response to WHO policies and WHA resolutions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether such prohibited claims could be observed in Australian websites that advertise infant formula products. A comprehensive internet search was...
Article
Full-text available
It is advantageous for children in foster care to have caregivers who are strongly attached to them. However, foster parents may have difficulty attaching to the children placed in their care because they fear the grief that they will feel if a child is removed. The parents of premature babies are another group who may face difficulty attaching to...
Article
Full-text available
Children who experience maltreatment in their families may be placed in out-of-home care. A large, and increasing, number of children are being raised in these settings in Australia. The history of maltreatment that children in out-of-home care have experienced results in a variety of educational challenges. It is generally believed that schools ar...
Article
The 2011 Christchurch New Zealand earthquake adversely affected large numbers of people and resulted in many mothers and infants evacuating the city. In the town of Timaru, an emergency day-stay breastfeeding service assisted evacuee women. The service was established after media messaging alerted mothers to the importance of breastfeeding and the...
Article
Full-text available
https://theconversation.com/profiles/julie-smith-145494/articles
Article
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Abstract The process by which women came to donate milk via online milk sharing networks was explored via a questionnaire administered to 97 peer milk donors. Seventy-one respondents stated that they were motivated to donate milk because they wanted to help someone. Many described milk donation as an empathic response to women with insufficient mil...
Article
Full-text available
Social workers have a responsibility to protect and uphold the human rights of their clients. For those individuals and organisations involved in child protection, the rights of children, as outlined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), provide essential guidance. The UNCRC supports the proposition that children have...
Article
Full-text available
The process by which women came to use internet-facilitated peer-to-peer shared milk was explored via a written questionnaire administered to 41 peer milk recipients from five countries. Respondents were universally unable to provide some or all of the milk their infants required. Twenty-nine dyads had a medical condition that could have affected t...
Article
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/132/5/e1227/reply#content-block In their study, "Microbial contamination of human milk purchased via the Internet," Keim and colleagues sought to "document the potential for human milk shared via the Internet to cause infectious disease." They measured bacterial contamination in breast milk purchased o...
Article
Full-text available
The perception and management of the risks of peer-to-peer milk sharing was explored via a written questionnaire administered to 97 peer milk donors and 41 peer milk recipients who were recruited via Facebook. All recipients’ respondents were aware that there were risks associated with using peer-shared milk and took action to mitigate these risks;...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To explore the intersection of peer-to-peer milk sharing and donor milk banks. Methods: A descriptive survey design containing closed and open-ended questions was used to examine women's perceptions of peer-to-peer milk sharing and milk banking. Closed-ended questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics and conventional qualita...
Article
Editor's note: One of the editorial goals for Clinical Lactation was to provide a forum where IBCLCs could respectfully discuss emerging, and sometimes controversial, issues that arise in our field. The issue of peer-to-peer milk sharing is one such issue. Social media has greatly facilitated this practice. Given the rise in milk-sharing behavior,...
Article
Full-text available
Infants and young children are vulnerable in emergencies. The media plays an important role in aid delivery and has a positive impact when reports are accurate. However, the media has been implicated in encouraging harmful aid in the form of donations of infant formula and other milk products. Internet-based media reports were collected after Cyclo...
Article
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The facilitation of peer-to-peer milk sharing via the Internet has proven challenging to many health professionals and organizations. Biomedical ethics can be used to explore medical dilemmas and find reasoned, consistent, and defensible solutions to moral problems. The principles of biomedical ethics – autonomy, veracity, beneficence, nonmaleficen...
Article
Full-text available
The advent of Internet forums that facilitate peer-to-peer human milk sharing has resulted in health authorities stating that sharing human milk is dangerous. There are risks associated with all forms of infant feeding, including breastfeeding and the use of manufactured infant formulas. However, health authorities do not warn against using formula...
Article
Full-text available
After only six months, a commerce-free internet-based milk-sharing model is operating in nearly 50 countries, connecting mothers who are able to donate breast milk with the caregivers of babies who need breast milk. Some public health authorities have condemned this initiative out of hand. Although women have always shared their milk, in many setti...
Article
Full-text available
Emergency management organisations recognise the vulnerability of infants in emergencies, even in developed countries. However, thus far, those who care for infants have not been provided with detailed information on what emergency preparedness entails. Emergency management authorities should provide those who care for infants with accurate and det...
Article
Full-text available
Women have the right to support that enables them to breastfeed. Supporting breastfeeding in emergencies is important because artificial feeding places mothers and children at risk. In emergencies, artificial feeding is dangerous to the infant, difficult and requires substantial resources. In contrast, breastfeeding guards infant health. It is also...
Article
Women have the right to support that enables them to breastfeed. Supporting breastfeeding in emergencies is important because artificial feeding places mothers and children at risk. In emergencies, artificial feeding is dangerous to the infant, difficult and requires substantial resources. In contrast, breastfeeding guards infant health. It is also...
Article
Full-text available
The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health) Initiative (BFHI) is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23%) have received accreditation...
Article
Full-text available
It is well known that exclusive breastfeeding provides protection against diarrhoeal infection, but the mechanisms behind this protection are poorly understood. In addition, it is well known that feeding a baby artificial baby milk dramatically increases the risk of diarrhoeal illness severe enough to require medical treatment, including hospitalis...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT: After only six months, a commerce-free internet-based milk-sharing model is operating in nearly 50 countries, connecting mothers who are able to donate breast milk with the caregivers of babies who need breast milk. Some public health authorities have condemned this initiative out of hand. Although women have always shared their milk, in...
Article
To explore the perceptions, understandings, and experiences of maternity service staff toward the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund (WHO/UNICEF) Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and its implementation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). An exploratory study using naturalistic methods of inquiry. Participants w...
Article
Full-text available
The breastfeeding experiences of 114 Australian children who were currently breastfeeding were explored via maternal observation and direct questioning of the children. Mothers commonly stated that their child breastfed for comfort and this opinion was validated by observations of when the children breastfed, which was often in the transition to sl...
Article
Full-text available
The experiences of 107 Australian women who were breastfeeding a child two years or older were gathered via a written questionnaire with open-ended questions. Eighty-seven percent of women had not originally intended to breastfeed long-term and many had initially felt disgust for breastfeeding beyond infancy. Mothers changed their opinion about lon...
Article
The recent release of new growth charts by the World Health Organization (WHO) heralds a fresh understanding of what constitutes normal infant growth and development. The Multicenter Growth Reference Study that underpins these new growth standards 'establish[es] breastfed infants as the normative model for growth and development'. This is in contra...
Article
Optimizing caregiving for newly adopted postinstitutionalized children. To consider a template of care for postinstitutionalized children based on experiences that physiological measures suggest are expected by infants postbirth. Published literature and clinical experience. Based on an understanding of physiologically expected care postbirth, spec...
Article
The recent release of new growth charts by the World Health Organization (WHO) heralds a fresh understanding of what constitutes normal infant growth and development.The Multicenter Growth Reference Study that underpins these new growth standards 'establish[es] breastfed infants as the normative model for growth and development'. This is in contras...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT : Breastfeeding an adopted child has previously been discussed as something that is nice to do but without potential for significant benefit. This paper reviews the evidence in physiological and behavioural research, that breastfeeding can play a significant role in developing the attachment relationship between child and mother. As illust...
Article
Full-text available
A case is presented in which a medically fragile baby was breastfed by her foster mother. As a result, the child's physical and emotional health were improved. The mechanisms whereby human milk improves health are well known. The act of breastfeeding may also have an analgesic and relaxant effect as a result of hormonal influences and skin-to-skin...
Article
Full-text available
Reports of 32 adopted children who sought breastfeeding from their mothers are presented. Children were 8 months to 12 years at placement and sought breastfeeding from the day of placement to several years after. Some children suckled only a few times whereas others breastfed frequently over a protracted period. Suckling was comforting to children...
Article
Full-text available
It is commonly believed that adoptive mothers in developing countries are more successful breastmilk producers than women in the west. A review of published research supports this assertion. However, an examination of the practice of adoptive breastfeeding in developing countries and in the west via the literature reveals differences that may expla...
Article
Submerged aquatic plants and plants in tissue culture both grow in an environment that does not allow transpirational pull to be exerted on plant organs. The tissue culture environment sometimes induces abnormal growth, a phenomenon known as vitrification or hyperhydricity. The hypothesis that a water-saturated environment induces vitrification by...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance of mineral nutrition for plantlet growth in vitro, there have been few studies on mineral uptake from growth media or on optimising the media used in tissue culture. As plants in vitro experience abnormal growth conditions and may not possess roots, they may use different mechanisms of mineral uptake than plants growing ex vi...
Article
Full-text available
Support is critical for breastfeeding success. Mother-to-mother support via groups such as La Leche League and the Australian Breastfeeding Association, formerly Nursing Mothers' Association of Australia, is helpful to mothers in average circumstances. However, for women who are in more unusual circumstances, this support may be inadequate on its o...
Article
A vitrification scoring system was devised that comprised a visual assessment of vitrification in vitro followed by transplanting of plantlets ex vitro and recording of plantlet survival rates. This proved to be a simple method of predicting survival of plantlets ex vitro and demonstrated that vitrification severity is more important than acclimiti...
Article
Full-text available
Vitrification of plants in vitro is a physiological abnormality of tissue-cultured plants which causes significant losses in the micropropagation industry. Vitrified plants are waterlogged but the position of water within plants has not been identified. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of normal tissue-cultured, vitrified tissue-cultured, a...
Article
Full-text available
Leaf surfaces of non-tissue-cultured, vitrified and non-vitrified plantlets of Gypsophila paniculata (Babies Breath) were examined using an environmental scanning electron microscope. Non-tissue-cultured plants had a complete epidermal surface, recessed stomata and wax present on the leaf surface. The surface of tissue-cultured plantlets appeared s...

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Projects (3)
Archived project
Project
This project is investigating foster/kinship carers experiences of infant feeding (<12 months). The aim of the project is to create an understanding of how decisions are made with regard to what (eg. formula, expressed breast milk, etc) and how (eg. breast fed, bottle fed, etc) the infants are fed in the Australian foster/kinship care context.