Karl P. Phillips

Karl P. Phillips
University College Cork | UCC · School of Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

28
Publications
4,661
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
312
Citations
Citations since 2017
21 Research Items
250 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Additional affiliations
February 2022 - present
University of New Brunswick
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2017 - February 2022
University College Cork
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2014 - May 2017
Adam Mickiewicz University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Background Rapidly spreading parasitic infections like amoebic gill disease (AGD) are increasingly problematic for Atlantic salmon reared in aquaculture facilities and potentially pose a risk to wild fish species in surrounding waters. Currently, it is not known whether susceptibility to AGD differs between wild and farmed salmon. Wild Atlantic sal...
Article
Full-text available
In general, males mate with multiple females to increase individual reproductive success. Whether or not, and under what circumstances, females benefit from multiple mating has been less clear. Our review of 154 studies covering 184 populations of amphibians and reptiles showed that polyandry was widespread and variable among and within taxonomic g...
Article
Full-text available
Although historical records of introductions that trigger successful biological invasions are common, subsequent patterns of dispersal and colonisation routes are unclear. We use microsatellites to examine genetic population structuring of established invasive brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations in Newfoundland, Canada, for evidence of “natural”...
Article
Full-text available
Domestication leads to changes in traits that are under directional selection in breeding programmes, though unintentional changes in non‐production traits can also arise. In offspring of escaping fish and any hybrid progeny, such unintentionally altered traits may reduce fitness in the wild. Atlantic salmon breeding programmes were established in...
Article
Full-text available
Natural host populations differ in their susceptibility to infection by parasites, and these intra‐population differences are still an incompletely understood component of host‐parasite dynamics. In this study, we used controlled infection experiments with wild‐caught guppies (Poecilia reticulata) and their ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli to in...
Article
Full-text available
A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41437-021-00407-y
Article
Full-text available
Animals often exhibit extensive flexibility in movement behaviours on a range of temporal and spatial scales in response to cues that reliably predict fitness outcomes. The annual timing of movements between distinct habitats can be crucial, particularly in seasonal environments with narrow ecological windows of opportunity. In polygamous species,...
Article
Selection pressure from parasites is thought to be a major force shaping the extreme polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, but the modes and consequences of selection remain unclear. Here, we analyse MHC class II and microsatellite diversity in 16 guppy (Poecilia reticulata) populations from two islands (Trinidad and Tob...
Article
Gyrodactylids are ubiquitous ectoparasites of teleost fish, but our understanding of the host immune response against them is fragmentary. Here, we used RNA‐Seq to investigate genes involved in the primary response to infection with Gyrodactylus bullatarudis on the skin of guppies, Poecilia reticulata, an important evolutionary model, but also one...
Article
Determining the molecular basis of parasite adaptation to its host is an important component in understanding host‐parasite coevolution and the epidemiology of parasitic infections. Here, we investigate short‐ and long‐term adaptive evolution in the eukaryotic parasite, Gyrodactylus bullatarudis, infecting Caribbean guppies (Poecilia reticulata), b...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The degree of natal philopatry relative to natal dispersal in animal populations has important demographic and genetic consequences and often varies substantially within species. In salmonid fishes, lakes have been shown to have a strong influence on dispersal and gene flow within catchments; for example, populations spawning in inflow str...
Article
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is crucial to the adaptive immune response of vertebrates and is among the most polymorphic gene families known. Its high diversity is usually attributed to selection imposed by fast-evolving pathogens. Pathogens are thought to evolve to escape recognition by common immune alleles, and, hence, novel MHC al...
Article
How individual genetic variability relates to fitness is important in understanding evolution and the processes affecting populations of conservation concern. Heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) have been widely used to study this link in wild populations, where key parameters that affect both variability and fitness, such as inbreeding, can...
Article
Balancing selection can maintain immunogenetic variation within host populations, but detecting its signal in a postbottlenecked population is challenging due to the potentially overriding effects of drift. Toll-like receptor genes (TLRs) play a fundamental role in vertebrate immune defence and are predicted to be under balancing selection. We prev...
Article
Hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata), which are distributed throughout the world's oceans, have undergone drastic declines across their range, largely due to anthropogenic factors. Assessing sizes, genetic variability and structure of their populations at global and regional levels is critical to the development of conservation manage- ment s...
Article
Understanding the spatial scale at which selection acts upon adaptive genetic variation in natural populations is fundamental to our understanding of evolutionary ecology, and has important ramifications for conservation. The environmental factors to which individuals of a population are exposed can vary at fine spatial scales, potentially generati...
Article
Full-text available
􀀷􀁋􀁈􀀃􀁉􀁕􀁈􀁖􀁋􀁚􀁄􀁗􀁈􀁕􀀃􀂿􀁖􀁋􀀃􀁒􀁉􀀃􀀷􀁒􀁅􀁄􀁊􀁒􀀃􀁚􀁈􀁕􀁈􀀃􀁕􀁈􀁓􀁒􀁕􀁗􀁈􀁇􀀃􀁅􀁜􀀃􀁄􀀃􀁑􀁘􀁐􀁅􀁈􀁕􀀃􀁒􀁉􀀃􀁕􀁈􀁖􀁈􀁄􀁕􀁆􀁋􀁈􀁕􀁖􀀃􀁅􀁈􀁗􀁚􀁈􀁈􀁑􀀃􀀔􀀜􀀔􀀓􀀃􀁄􀁑􀁇􀀃􀀔􀀜􀀜􀀛􀀏􀀃􀁚􀁌􀁗􀁋􀀃􀁇􀁌􀁉􀁉􀁈􀁕􀁌􀁑􀁊􀀃􀁖􀁓􀁈􀁆􀁌􀁈􀁖􀀃 􀁕􀁌􀁆􀁋􀁑􀁈􀁖􀁖􀀃􀁄􀁑􀁇􀀃􀁇􀁌􀁙􀁈􀁕􀁖􀁌􀁗􀁜􀀃􀁅􀁈􀁌􀁑􀁊􀀃􀁏􀁌􀁖􀁗􀁈􀁇􀀃􀁅􀁜􀀃􀁈􀁄􀁆􀁋􀀑􀀃􀀵􀁈􀁖􀁘􀁏􀁗􀁖􀀃􀁒􀁉􀀃􀁗􀁋􀁈􀀃􀁕􀁈􀁆􀁈􀁑􀁗􀀃􀁖􀁘􀁕􀁙􀁈􀁜􀀃􀁕􀁈􀁓􀁒􀁕􀁗􀁈􀁇􀀃􀁋􀁈􀁕􀁈􀀃􀁖􀁈􀁕􀁙􀁈􀀃􀁗􀁒􀀃􀁘􀁓􀁇􀁄􀁗􀁈􀀃􀁗􀁋􀁌􀁖􀀃􀁅􀁄􀁖􀁈􀁏􀁌􀁑􀁈􀀑􀀃 Surveys were conducted at 81 sites in Tobago over the time period 2004-2015, with observations being conducted bo...
Article
Full-text available
Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) code for receptors that are central to the adaptive immune response of vertebrates. These genes are therefore important genetic markers with which to study adaptive genetic variation in the wild. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has increasingly been used in the last decade to genotype the MHC. Ho...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of ‘effective population size’ (Ne), which quantifies how quickly a population will lose genetic variability, is one of the most important contributions of theoretical evolutionary biology to practical conservation management. Ne is often much lower than actual population size: how much so depends on key life history and demographic par...
Article
Postcopulatory sperm storage can serve a range of functions, including ensuring fertility, allowing delayed fertilization and facilitating sexual selection. Sperm storage is likely to be particularly important in wide-ranging animals with low population densities, but its prevalence and importance in such taxa, and its role in promoting sexual sele...

Network

Cited By