Karl D Bellve

Karl D Bellve
University of Massachusetts Medical School | UMMS · Program in Molecular Medicine

About

57
Publications
6,164
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,655
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 1996 - present
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Context: Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) optimizes the performance of cytology, but requires skilled handling, and smearing can make the material unavailable for some ancillary tests. There is a need to facilitate ROSE without sacrificing part of the sample. Objective: We evaluated the image quality of inexpensive deconvolution fluorescence micr...
Article
Full-text available
For quality, interpretation, reproducibility and sharing value, microscopy images should be accompanied by detailed descriptions of the conditions that were used to produce them. Micro-Meta App is an intuitive, highly interoperable, open-source software tool that was developed in the context of the 4D Nucleome (4DN) consortium and is designed to fa...
Article
Full-text available
Adenomyosis is a debilitating gynecological disease of the uterus with no medicinal cure. The tissue injury and repair hypothesis for adenomyosis suggests that uterine hyperperistalsis or dysperistalsis plays a pivotal role in establishing adenomyotic lesions. However, specific impairments in uterine peristalsis and the underlying cellular signals...
Article
Full-text available
For the information content of microscopy images to be appropriately interpreted, reproduced, and meet FAIR (Findable Accessible Interoperable and Reusable) principles, they should be accompanied by detailed descriptions of microscope hardware, image acquisition settings, image pixel and dimensional structure, and instrument performance. Nonetheles...
Preprint
Full-text available
For the information content of microscopy images to be appropriately interpreted, reproduced, and meet FAIR (Findable Accessible Interoperable and Reusable) principles, they should be accompanied by detailed descriptions of microscope hardware, image acquisition settings, image pixel, and dimensional structure, and instrument performance. Nonethele...
Article
Full-text available
Adipocytes deficient in fatty acid synthase (iAdFASNKO) emit signals that mimic cold exposure to enhance the appearance of thermogenic beige adipocytes in mouse inguinal white adipose tissues (iWATs). Both cold exposure and iAdFASNKO upregulate the sympathetic nerve fiber (SNF) modulator Neuregulin 4 (Nrg4), activate SNFs, and require adipocyte cyc...
Preprint
Full-text available
The browning of inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) through increased abundance of thermogenic beige/brite adipocytes is induced by cold exposure and many other perturbations in association with beneficial systemic metabolic effects. Adipose browning is reported to require activation of sympathetic nerve fibers (SNF), aided by alternately activate...
Article
Full-text available
Small-molecule fluorescent wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugates are routinely used to demarcate mammalian plasma membranes, because they bind to the cell's glycocalyx. Here, we describe the derivatization of WGA with a pH-sensitive rhodamine fluorophore (pHRho; pKa = 7) to detect proton channel fluxes and extracellular proton accumulation and dep...
Preprint
Full-text available
Small molecule fluorescent wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugates are routinely used to demarcate mammalian plasma membranes because they bind to the cell's glycocalyx. Here we describe the derivatization of WGA with a pH sensitive rhodamine fluorophore (pHRho: pKa = 7) to detect proton channel fluxes and extracellular proton accumulation and deple...
Article
Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity, with few prevention and treatment options. Uterine contraction is a central feature of PTB, so gaining new insights into the mechanisms of this contraction and consequently identifying novel targets for tocolytics are essential for more successful management of PTB. Here...
Article
Full-text available
Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) - an enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing lysosomal glycogen. Deficiency of GAA leads to systemic glycogen accumulation in the lysosomes of skeletal muscle, motor neurons and smooth muscle. Skeletal muscle and motor neuron pathology are known to co...
Article
Cells use plasma membrane proton fluxes to maintain cytoplasmic and extracellular pH and to mediate the co-transport of metabolites and ions. Because proton-coupled transport often involves movement of multiple substrates, traditional electrical measurements provide limited information about proton transport at the cell surface. Here we visualize v...
Article
Full-text available
siRNAs are a new class of therapeutic modalities with promising clinical efficacy that requires modification or formulation for delivery to the tissue and cell of interest. Conjugation of siRNAs to lipophilic groups supports efficient cellular uptake by a mechanism that is not well characterized. Here we study the mechanism of internalization of as...
Article
Full-text available
The assembly and maintenance of most cilia and flagella rely on intraflagellar transport (IFT). Recentin vitrostudies have suggested that the calponin-homology domain in the IFT81 N-terminus and the highly basic N-terminus of IFT74 together form a module for IFT of tubulin. UsingChlamydomonasmutants for IFT81 and IFT74, we have tested this hypothes...
Article
Full-text available
The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) facilitates high-affinity presynaptic DA reuptake that temporally and spatially constrains DA neurotransmission. Aberrant DAT function is implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder. DAT is a major psychostimulant target, and psychostimulant reward strictly requires binding...
Article
Full-text available
During pregnancy, adipose tissue (AT) must expand to support the growing fetus and the future nutritional needs of the offspring. Limited expandability of AT is associated with insulin resistance, attributed to ectopic lipid deposition. This study aimed to investigate human AT expandability during pregnancy and its role in the pathogenesis of gesta...
Article
Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps1...
Article
Full-text available
The protein nephrocystin-4 (NPHP4) is widespread in ciliated organisms, and defects in NPHP4 cause nephronophthisis and blindness in humans. To learn more about NPHP4's function, we have studied it in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. NPHP4 is stably incorporated into the distal part of the flagellar transition zone, close to the membrane and distal to CE...
Article
Adrenal chromaffin cells (ACCs), stimulated by the splanchnic nerve, generate action potentials (AP) at a frequency near 0.5 Hz in the resting physiological state, at times described as “rest and digest.” How such low frequency stimulation in turn elicits sufficient catecholamine exocytosis to set basal sympathetic tone is not readily explained by...
Article
Changes in adipose tissue mass must be accompanied by parallel changes in microcirculation. Investigating the mechanisms that regulate adipose tissue angiogenesis could lead to better understanding of adipose tissue function and reveal new potential therapeutic strategies. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new capillaries from existing mi...
Article
Focus stabilization is critical for many imaging modalities like TIRF, PALM and STORM. The focus stabilization device presented here, named pgFocus, is an open source and open hardware solution that can be integrated into microscopes with an existing objective positioner. pgFocus is a programmable and inexpensive circuit board consisting of a micro...
Article
Full-text available
Dopaminergic signaling profoundly impacts rewarding behaviors, movement, and executive function. The presynaptic dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) recaptures released DA, thereby limiting synaptic DA availability and maintaining dopaminergic tone. DAT constitutively internalizes and PKC activation rapidly accelerates DAT endocytosis, resulting in DAT...
Article
In addition to its role as a morphogen, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) has also been shown to function as a guidance factor that directly acts on the growth cones of various types of axons. However, the noncanonical signaling pathways that mediate the guidance effects of Shh protein remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that a novel signaling pathway cons...
Article
Full-text available
Cell surface receptors and other proteins internalize through diverse mechanisms at the plasma membrane and are sorted to different destinations. Different subpopulations of early endosomes have been described, raising the question of whether different internalization mechanisms deliver cargo into different subsets of early endosomes. To address th...
Article
Full-text available
The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is expressed widely in the brain, with high levels in the cerebellum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. We have shown that L-type Ca(2+) channels in terminals of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons are coupled to RyRs, as they are in skeletal muscle, allowing voltage-induced Ca(2+) release (VICaR) from internal Ca(2...
Article
Full-text available
Short-lived, localized Ca(2+) events mediate Ca(2+) signaling with high efficiency and great fidelity largely as a result of the close proximity between Ca(2+)-permeable ion channels and their molecular targets. However, in most cases, direct evidence of the spatial relationship between these two types of molecules is lacking, and, thus, mechanisti...
Article
Type 1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1) are the second most common isoform found in neurons after RyR2. We have provided evidence that in nerve terminals from neurohypophysis, L-type Ca2+ channels are coupled to RyR1 in the same way found in EC coupling in skeletal muscle. In these nerve terminals (J.Neuroscience 2006, 26 −7565) L-type channels are the s...
Article
Full-text available
A central concept in the physiology of neurosecretion is that a rise in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in the vicinity of plasmalemmal Ca(2+) channels due to Ca(2+) influx elicits exocytosis. Here, we examine the effect on spontaneous exocytosis of a rise in focal cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in the vicinity of ryanodine receptors (RYRs) due to release from internal sto...
Article
Full-text available
Macropinocytosis is a type of poorly characterized fluid-phase endocytosis that results in formation of relatively large vesicles. We report that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) protein induces macropinocytosis in the axons through activation of a noncanonical signaling pathway, including Rho GTPase and nonmuscle myosin II. Macropinocytosis induced by Shh is...
Article
Huntingtin (Htt) localizes to endosomes, but its role in the endocytic pathway is not established. Recently, we found that Htt is important for the activation of Rab11, a GTPase involved in endosomal recycling. Here we studied fibroblasts of healthy individuals and patients with Huntington's disease (HD), which is a movement disorder caused by poly...
Article
Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has being used to investigate membrane structures smaller than optical resolution. Thus, a fluorescence punctum in a TIRF image reflects one or more such fluorescently labeled entities. We have developed a theory linking the fluorescence puncta to their underlying randomly distributed sub-res...
Article
Recent progresses in overcoming the diffraction-limited optical resolution have mostly relied on spatial modulation of fluorophore's distribution between its bright and dark photophysical states. Such feat is often accomplished through complex and expensive experimental setups, and almost all the related super-resolution imaging techniques are host...
Article
Full-text available
The biological function of receptors is determined by their appropriate trafficking through the endosomal pathway. Following internalization, the transferrin (Tf) receptor quantitatively recycles to the plasma membrane, whereas the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor undergoes degradation. To determine how Tf and EGF engage these two different p...
Article
Full-text available
Ca(2+) sparks are highly localized, transient releases of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In smooth muscle, Ca(2+) sparks trigger spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) by opening nearby clusters of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and also gate Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (Cl((Ca))) channe...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce a multiphoton microscope for high-speed three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence imaging. The system combines parallel illumination by a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM) with parallel detection via a segmented high-sensitivity charge-couple device (CCD) camera. The instrument consists of a Ti-sapphire laser illuminating a microlens a...
Article
Full-text available
Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy reveals highly mobile structures containing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) within a zone about 100 nm beneath the plasma membrane of 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We developed a computer program (Fusion Assistant) that enables direct analysis of the docking/fusio...
Article
Full-text available
The FYVE domain binds with high specificity and avidity to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. It is present in ≈30 proteins in humans, some of which have been implicated in functions ranging from early endosome fusion to signal transduction through the TGF-β receptor. To develop a further understanding of the biological roles of this protein family,...
Article
Full-text available
Ca2+ stores were studied in a preparation of freshly dissociated terminals from hypothalamic magnocellular neurons. Depolarization from a holding level of -80 mV in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ elicited Ca2+ release from intraterminal stores, a ryanodine-sensitive process designated as voltage-induced Ca2+ release (VICaR). The release took one...
Article
Full-text available
Clathrin assembly at the plasma membrane is a fundamental process required for endocytosis. In cultured cells, most of the clathrin is localized to large patches that display little lateral mobility. The functional role of these regions is not clear, and it has been thought that they may represent artifacts of cell adhesion of cultured cells. Here...
Article
Caveolae are present in almost all cells and concentrate a wide variety of signaling molecules, receptors, transporters, and ion pumps. We have investigated the distribution of the ryanodine receptor, the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, the predominant Na(+) channel isoform rH1, and the L-type calcium channel, Ca(v)1.2, relative to the muscle-specific cave...
Article
1We recorded Ca2+ sparks and spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) simultaneously in smooth muscle cells using whole-cell patch recording and a unique, high-speed widefield digital imaging system to monitor fluo-3 fluorescence in both two and three dimensions (2D and 3D).2In 2D imaging, the correlation between the amplitude of a spark and...
Article
Full-text available
Localized, transient elevations in cytosolic Ca2+, known as Ca2+ sparks, caused by Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, are thought to trigger the opening of large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels in the plasma membrane resulting in spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) in smooth muscle cells. But the precise relationship...
Article
Full-text available
Localized, transient elevations in cytosolic Ca2+, known as Ca2+ sparks, caused by Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, are thought to trigger the opening of large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels in the plasma membrane resulting in spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) in smooth muscle cells. But the precise relationship...
Article
Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Maryland, 1996. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 177-193).

Network

Cited By